David Sterritt

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For 1,985 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Sterritt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Lost in Translation
Lowest review score: 0 Vegas Vacation
Score distribution:
1985 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    A compulsively watchable movie that's also a provocative inquiry into the ability of the criminal-justice system to determine culpability and truth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    Payami's gentle comedy captures a subtle range of human feelings through a quietly inventive visual style that embodies the best life-affirming tendencies of modern Iranian film.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    One of the great Bertolucci's most acclaimed films...Trintignant gives a legendary performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    A skeptical view of George W. Bush's chief political strategist, Karl Rove, using argumentative strategies common to agenda-driven documentaries.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    Filmed to perfection by the great Christopher Doyle and others.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    In short, they don't make 'em like this one anymore. Viewing it is like taking a time machine to a movie age that was more naive than our own in some ways, more sophisticated and ambitious in others.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    The movie is flawed by implausible psychology and moments of weak acting. But it's more than redeemed by Lee's passionate ideas about America today.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    The visual style is at once deliberately archaic and slyly postmodernist, slinky and sensuous from first frame to last.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    Understated acting and brilliant use of wide-screen black-and-white cinematography.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    Tsai's cinematic style is unique: He unfolds his stories in long, static shots that let you discover their surprises and mysteries on your own. And that's great fun. What Time Is It There? is perky, entertaining, and one of a kind.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    Suspenseful, surprising, and psychologically rich.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    A plan for a perfect murder goes wildly wrong in this 1958 melodrama by one of France's great filmmakers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    In the Mirror of Maya Deren, creatively written and directed by Martina Kudlacek, is an eloquent memorial to her unique accomplishments -- and an excellent introduction for those who have yet to discover them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    Kidman, Moore, and Streep do some of their best work, backed by a first-rank supporting cast.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    The acting is superb, the filmmaking is imaginative, and the story never goes quite where you expect.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    You may become a cinemaniac yourself after sitting through this beauty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 David Sterritt
    A riveting re-creation of three world-changing collapses: those of the Nazi party, of militarized Germany as a whole, and of the F├╝hrer who guided them into self-destructive ruin.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 David Sterritt
    I find it the most adventurous and imaginative American film I've seen this year - and also the weirdest.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 David Sterritt
    Tim Robbins gives a strong performance in this first-class horror yarn, which has a surprisingly strong political edge.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 David Sterritt
    Back to the Future doesn't exactly leap out of the starting gate, and some scenes are strung out by gimmicky editing. But the story picks up steam as it goes along, and the last third is especially full of speedy surprises. [3 July 1985, p.23]
    • Christian Science Monitor
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    The story is slender, but the Brazilian settings are exquisite and lilting tunes by Antonio Carlos Jobim cast a spell over the entire enterprise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    Has a mixture of strengths and limitations often found in historical epics: lots of eye-filling action and spectacle, little in the way of psychology or human interest.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    Some will find the movie's sexual antics too explicit and unconventional for comfort.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    A thriller so tricky that figuring it out is half the fun.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    Most of the acting is as real and warm as the characters themselves. And the streets, shops, and living rooms of Brooklyn have never seemed more inviting. [29 Jan 1988]
    • Christian Science Monitor
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    As the uptight banker, Robbins does some of his subtlest acting to date. As his hardened but resilient friend, Freeman is simply miraculous, giving the role so much depth, dignity, and good humor that you feel that you've known this man forever. [27 Sept 1994]
    • Christian Science Monitor
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    Leaves out portions of John Irving's novel that would have given it more balance and perspective, but the acting by Maguire and Caine is first-rate by any standard.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    Bird isn't an easy film, and it doesn't always make an effort to be likable. But it's a dazzler - at least as good as "Round Midnight,'' and that's saying a lot.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    To say it right out, The Bostonians is the best movie I've seen all year.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 David Sterritt
    The film should captivate anyone with a taste for bold cinematics, unpredictable storytelling, and pitch-black humor aimed at the worthiest of targets: a self-involved and self-congratulatory, industry that often gives lip service to art while worshipping the bottom line. [10 Apr 1992]
    • Christian Science Monitor

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