David Stratton
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For 93 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Stratton's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Lantana
Lowest review score: 20 Lies
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 70 out of 93
  2. Negative: 3 out of 93
93 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    The Piano confirms Campion as a major talent, an uncompromising filmmaker with a very personal and specific vision.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    Exquisitely made love story.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    Pacing is on the button, and the film moves inexorably, without any flat moments, toward the suspenseful, if morally indefensible, finale.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    The film is traditionally and effectively made; it also is superbly acted.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 David Stratton
    Looks and sounds wonderful, and while more information about these giants of African-Latin music might have been welcome, the music's the thing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 David Stratton
    A wonderfully acted, acutely observed psychological drama.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    An arthouse film par excellence, a consummately made study of loneliness and frustration.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 David Stratton
    A mellow, stately, contemplative study of a stoic, brave man, but it doesn't deliver in the action department.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    A throughly researched and extremely informative survey of the life and work of one of the great figures of world cinema, Richard Schickel's Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin is a must for lovers of cinema.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    It succeeds emotionally in the cause of what seems to be its primary aim, to advance an attitudinal change in Australians not normally sympathetic to the aboriginal cause.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    This well researched, detailed examination of the life and work of the legendary avant-garde filmmaker, writer and dancer, Maya Deren, should provoke renewed interest in her -- she emerges as a beautiful, willful, wayward talent with an exceptional vision and a great love for life and for the avant-garde world.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Though billed as a documentary, The Five Obstructions doesn't easily fall into any category. Perhaps it's best described as a game, in which a pair of Danish film directors from different generations spar with one another in a highly civilized, and surprisingly entertaining, fashion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Liv Ullmann, directing her second Bergman screenplay (after 1997’s “Private Confessions”), extracts every nuance from the tantalizing material.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    An entrancing ensemble piece, directed with calm assurance, acted by a fine ensemble, and structured and scripted with wit and precision.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Eye-grabbing performances from Emily Watson and Rachel Griffiths, who portray celebrated British cellist Jacqueline Du Pre and her older sister, Hilary, distinguish this ambitious but flawed biography.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Grounded by a vigorous, physical performance from Choi Min-Sik, who brings both earthiness and grandeur to the central role, the film vividly evokes the world of an obsessive natural talent.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    An intelligent and extremely well-made romantic drama that tells an intriguing story with economy and insight.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    Delicately handled and superbly textured, this fine adaptation of Graham Swift's Booker Prize-winning novel deals with all the really big subjects: love, friendship, death, life.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 David Stratton
    Isn't only an outstanding documentary -- it's also a powerful personal drama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    Despite the disappointing conclusion, it's hard not to be affected by the film, because of the director's frank approach to her subject and the sheer skill with which she tells her story.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    Watson is a major find as Bess. Graced with delicate, expressive features, she gives an extraordinary performance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Brimming with almost too many ideas for its 99-minute running time, Duncan's film boasts a strong cast of top actors who flesh out a group of bizarre yet recognizable characters involved in the political scene from the '50s to the present day.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Made with deft evenhandedness, Paul Devlin's accomplished film plays almost like a fictional drama, containing suspense, comedy and some colorful characters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    This poignant film about an Israeli family rendered dysfunctional by the sudden death of the husband and father is a strongly emotional experience despite its tendency toward cryptic dramatics.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Fluid camerawork, a resonant music score and tightly wound editing combine to produce a superior suspense film with a conclusion that is somewhat reminiscent of the final acts of Robert Altman's "McCabe and Mrs. Miller" and of Joseph Losey's "The Criminal."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    This intelligent, engaging indie sets out to find a few answers and in the process introduces a clutch of interesting, very human characters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Intriguing, provocative and very well acted.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    This depiction of the trials and tribulations of a working-class Catholic family during the Depression is a far more intimate viewing experience than the similarly themed "Angela's Ashes."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 David Stratton
    Develops into a powerfully emotional experience thanks to a career-best performance by Toni Collette.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Visually the film impresses, with Eduardo Serra's widescreen camerawork evocatively capturing the streets and interiors of London and a rain-swept Venice. Pacing is crisp, with little time wasted on inessentials. Dialogue is often caustically witty, and the relations clearly delineated.