David Stratton
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For 93 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Stratton's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Calle 54
Lowest review score: 20 Imagining Argentina
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 70 out of 93
  2. Negative: 3 out of 93
93 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    A tremendous, stellar cast is mostly confined to minor roles, but all shine under Allen's assured direction.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    An intelligent and extremely well-made romantic drama that tells an intriguing story with economy and insight.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    A cheerfully vulgar and bitchy, but essentially warmhearted, road movie with a difference, which boasts an amazing star turn by Terence Stamp as a transsexual, Stephan Elliott's second feature is a lot of fun.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Visually inventive and refreshingly witty, pic provides an insider's look at the contempo Sydney music scene and showcases a smart young cast.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Grounded by a vigorous, physical performance from Choi Min-Sik, who brings both earthiness and grandeur to the central role, the film vividly evokes the world of an obsessive natural talent.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Liv Ullmann, directing her second Bergman screenplay (after 1997’s “Private Confessions”), extracts every nuance from the tantalizing material.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Cheekily diverting, decidedly feel-good, tremendously sexy entertainment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    It certainly wraps the trilogy on a very powerful, emotionally draining note. It's refreshing to see the precision and audacity with which Belvaux and his excellent cast succeed in imbuing the increasingly familiar story with completely new angles, insights and nuances.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    An impressively staged, dark-toned revisiting of the life and times of Australia's boldest and most charismatic outlaw.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Eye-grabbing performances from Emily Watson and Rachel Griffiths, who portray celebrated British cellist Jacqueline Du Pre and her older sister, Hilary, distinguish this ambitious but flawed biography.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Within the confines of this tried-and-true formula, Luhrmann has concocted a feel-good entertainment, which is lively, original (in an old-fashioned sort of way) and charming.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Intriguing, provocative and very well acted.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Will connect with anyone who ever had a bad experience with a bank or finance company, and provides a satisfyingly loathsome character in Anthony LaPaglia's engaging protrayal of a corporate shark.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Brimming with almost too many ideas for its 99-minute running time, Duncan's film boasts a strong cast of top actors who flesh out a group of bizarre yet recognizable characters involved in the political scene from the '50s to the present day.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Though billed as a documentary, The Five Obstructions doesn't easily fall into any category. Perhaps it's best described as a game, in which a pair of Danish film directors from different generations spar with one another in a highly civilized, and surprisingly entertaining, fashion.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    This is unquestionably Cronenberg Lite, but there is plenty of fun to be had from the absurdities and convoluted plotting, and a solid cast lends stature to the far-fetched fantasies.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    Utterly fascinating, playfully probing mystery story.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 David Stratton
    This well researched, detailed examination of the life and work of the legendary avant-garde filmmaker, writer and dancer, Maya Deren, should provoke renewed interest in her -- she emerges as a beautiful, willful, wayward talent with an exceptional vision and a great love for life and for the avant-garde world.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    The younger casting brings a freshness to the material and, with Allen as the weird mentor, there are plenty of laughs, even if the pacing's slow and the running time over-extended.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    An exceedingly sleek and handsome thriller, this ambitious European co-production, like the novel on which it's quite faithfully based, starts intriguingly but fails to stay the distance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Too often goes off on a tangent with unessential anecdotes and then fails to deliver in more important areas.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Shot on location in subdued colors, Twist offers much less hope for its troubled characters than Dickens did. Its very downbeat vision may turn off auds, which is a pity because the film has a great many qualities, not least the admirable performances of Stahl, Close and Pelletier.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    A visually lush and very Westernized vision of life in a remote Chinese village in the early 1970s.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Technically, this is Jackson's best to date, with state of the art creature and gore effects by Richard Taylor and prosthetics design by Bob McCarron. There's any amount of dismemberment, disembowelling, beheading, and the like, all of it handled with bloody conviction.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Evil is not, as the title would suggest, a horror film, at least not a conventional one. Based on the autobiographical novel by Jan Guillou and set in the mid-1950s, the film relates the experiences of a troubled young man who's enrolled into a hidebound private school.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Despite fine performances and the care lavished on the production, Amen. is never as emotionally powerful as it should be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Visually the film impresses, with Eduardo Serra's widescreen camerawork evocatively capturing the streets and interiors of London and a rain-swept Venice. Pacing is crisp, with little time wasted on inessentials. Dialogue is often caustically witty, and the relations clearly delineated.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Not exactly a police corruption thriller, the film is more a study of innocence betrayed, though its insights into Argentine law enforcement are pretty scary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Although writer-director Khientse Norbu breaks no ground in unfolding two parallel stories about young men seeking fresh horizons, he creates believable characters -- and has the great benefit of living in a country that provides seldom-seen locations at the top of the world.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Stratton
    Haroun's film is both touching and, ultimately, almost perversely optimistic.

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