Deborah Young

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For 232 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Deborah Young's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Nostalgia for the Light
Lowest review score: 30 A Strange Course of Events
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 4 out of 232
232 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Though it takes some time to sort out the large cast, the leads, all fine actors, eventually come into focus. As the good and bad samurai, Yakusho and Ichimura have the gravitas to take their roles seriously and perform a decisive one-on-one sword fight straight.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    While the stories the film tells are lively and never uninteresting, they fail to ignite an emotional explosion. The reach is also too broad for a film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    A film whose very surreal, disturbing first hour dissolves in disappointing B-movie nonsense at the end. Still it’s hard to remember a film about S&M as funny as this one, or one as beautifully and weirdly imagined.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Though it begs for a little lightening up, a moment of irony, a wink at the audience, this dead-serious fairy tale about a mysterious young woman (and a phantom automaton straight out of Hugo) is worth watching for Geoffrey Rush’s sensitive, never pandering performance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The attention given to constructing each shot makes for a hypnotic visual experience, while lack of a progressive narrative telescopes film's running time into infinity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    It feels like every script-reader in the Italian-Swiss-German-Albanian-Kosovo coproduction cut out a line of dialogue in each scene, leaving behind an irritating silence and an enigmatic puzzle for the audience to second-guess.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The overwritten script has so many subplots it’s hard to keep the stories straight, especially when the ending throws a truly unexpected twist. But little matter; the exceptional tech work gives the film plenty of energy and excitement.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Only the bravura of the cast, first and foremost Park and Lee (both veterans of Unbowed), generates sufficient interest to see the film through to its surprising conclusion, recounted in a respectful coda many years later.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The film feels empty and intellectualized at the core, where it should feel powerfully emotional.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Despite a warmly interacting cast that includes Jennifer Ehle as Emily’s sister and Keith Carradine as her lion-maned, lionized father, and a valiant effort on the part of Nixon and Davies to externalize the poet’s inner demons in emotional, high-tension scenes, the film can’t escape an underlying static quality that extinguishes the flame before it can get burning.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    A low-structure, high-involvement Brazilian free-for-all destined to take its place among hellish prison films, Carandiru plants a fist in the viewer's stomach.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Director Vincent Sandoval (Senorita) seems most interested in is using the convent as a metaphor for Filipino society in the Seventies, which buried its head in the sand while president Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law and police tortured and murdered opposition protestors.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Where Guan excels is in straight dramatization.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Holding the film together are simple but strong B&W visuals of offbeat types sitting around a table smoking and drinking java while they talk.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Film's pared-down look has a stylish simplicity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Takes the viewer on a mysterious and sporadically fascinating trip into the darkness of the human heart and Thai legend.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Despite its careful control of tone and a raging central performance by Ciaran Hinds, which is actually sufficient reason to see the film, this story of a man who plunges into childhood memories in the aftermath of his wife’s death remains admirable but wingless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    There is a darkness in all these “average” characters, underlined by low-key acting and the film’s sinisterly calm, measured pace.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Pleasantly watchable.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Like an Iraq-war mirror image of "Life Is Beautiful," actor-director Roberto Benigni's The Tiger and the Snow re-runs the successful structure and comic persona of the 1998 Oscar-winning film in a trippy fantasia about a poet who follows his love to hell and, in this happier ending, back.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Has the comically grotesque appeal of a Fellini film and could reach out to auds in specialized release. It lacks the originality and invention to go much beyond that.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    All this is portrayed in such elementary terms it could be the libretto of a 19th century operetta, or maybe a children’s film, were it not so disturbing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    A lovely film that makes little emotional connection.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Mostly one wishes for a more concise edit that would pull this impressive avalanche of memories and faded photos together a lot sooner.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    If it wasn’t for the charming top-liners who can make literary dialogue sound sexy in their sleep, the war in Fred Schepisi’s Words and Pictures would have to be called off after the opening skirmish.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Intense and engaging performances from Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy bring the well-written screenplay to life.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Argento fans lusting for a classy slasher movie of the "Suspiria"/"Opera" variety are headed for a disappointing rendezvous with an old-fashioned police thriller, upgraded by serious actors in the main roles.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Though weak in the drama department, the story of a brother and sister who love each other but have different political ideas and personal agendas effectively captures the tension of the time.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The story-telling is a little too pat to deliver the surprise moments that reveal character or sweep audiences up emotionally. The film remains a creepy story with a lot of morbid fascination, set off by the captivating young Florencia Bado in her first screen role.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Writer and director Portman's film seems conflicted over whether it is about young Amos or his mother, whom she portrays as a beautiful, cultured woman with a head full of romantic fantasies.

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