For 348 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diane Werts' Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Gilmore Girls: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Partners (2012): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 52 out of 348
348 tv reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The Assets isn't flashy, but boy, is it effective. It just grinds away, laying down intriguing details of "asset" care and feeding, made vivid through determined performances and intense crescendos.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The show's core relationship is appealingly relaxed. It dares to suggest successful coupledom lies less in heated passion than in being able to dress down and screw up and know you're still loved.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Browncoats Unite keeps the focus on the work itself. And that's what keeps "Firefly" afloat.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Their [John Brownlow and co-writer Don Macpherson's] saga is so vividly shaded, even minor characters resonate.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Finding Carter isn't some teen show. It's a stellar drama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    With two shopping trips in each half-hour, TLC's latest hit is so fast-paced--and such giddy consumerism--that it's fairly irresistible. Also educational.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Fascinating documentary--and extremely effective commercial.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The Millers shows what a thing of glory hear-the-laughs sitcomedy can be in the hands of masters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Complaining about the show's pre-fab structure is like shootin' fish in a barrel--no point to ask what's-the-point, no fair to ponder whether it's fair, because you end up with dinner anyhow, and folks gonna gobble it. Duck Dynasty is tasty enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Garcia's single-camera editing amplifies the comedy inherent, rather than being a crutch to create it. And the casting here is as good as "Earl," which is saying something--even if Leachman goes a bit off the rails as wacked-out "mamaw."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    [Bill Lawrence] scores again here, with an instantly appealing ensemble, from Astin's "soulless upstairs tool" to Rory Scovel as the downstairs dude from "a very competitive community college.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Black Box creates compelling people while smartly pondering identity, relationships, connection--it doesn't need the amped-up atmosphere.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The complex impact of the crime--and of its investigation, news coverage and town reaction--is the real story here, laid out in the decidedly ordinary faces and raw silent spaces that British drama delivers so well.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Strong personalities evoke the hold of the old, the tug of the new, and that intersection's human fireworks.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    With [Mike O'Malley's] fluid scripts, these sharp actors hit not just three-pointers but also free throws.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    [A] strongly acted thriller, which seems to add another intense dimension weekly.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    [These women make] instant impact, of course, with their stories but also through sheer personality.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    There's humor, there's heart, you'll laugh when you don't expect to.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Producer Beers' team is the gold standard in male-aimed reality, and these guys have grit to burn.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    We ultimately get to spend time with Henson's judges hashing it out. That brings insight into what makes things work, into creature logic, proportions, movement, performance facilitation, and letting the creation "emote through its environment." We don't just watch art being made, we come to understand the process.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The soul of the show, though, is its conflicted "heroes," truly tortured, in palpable ways, recalling the best, early days of NBC's ill-fated Monday comic book. There's no cartoonery here. Just adult adventure and angst.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    The show's crisp, witty dialogue is mostly egalitarian among the ages, and everyone's great at working the words.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    This evocative hour doesn't lionize Steinem, but simply lays out what happened.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    Lizzie Borden takes an ax to many assumptions--including the one that Lifetime movies aren't worth watching.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Diane Werts
    It all adds up to one solid nail-biter, with a profusion of clever clues that seems to cast suspicion on everyone.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    This playful hour gets under your skin with its quirky personality humor, at the same time it's spinning a pretty fair murder yarn. [12 July 2002, p.B51]
    • Newsday
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    This eccentric assemblage truly captures the distinct feel of Vegas-the night, the gallows humor of grisly work and the people who thrive on it. Sure, it's seedy, surreal and supremely specific. That's why we're hooked. [6 Oct 2000, p.B51]
    • Newsday
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    This stuff is good. No, superb.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    There's a vibrancy here, and a clarity, that we haven't seen in network sitcoms in ages. The way ABC's "Lost" reconfigured dramatic storytelling, Showtime's Barbershop so invigorates the humor format that we hate to call it a sitcom. It's entirely its own animal. And that's evolution of a kind everyone can get behind. [12 Aug 2005, p.]
    • Newsday
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Diane Werts
    Sly as "The Larry Sanders Show," keener than "Fat Actress," more sympathetic than "Curb Your Enthusiasm," this new half-hour comedy hits the bull's-eye in every direction. It's funny, sad, smart and immensely appealing. [5 June 2005, p.11]
    • Newsday

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