For 103 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Costa's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Beginners
Lowest review score: 0 Day of the Falcon
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 47 out of 103
  2. Negative: 36 out of 103
103 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Costa
    One of the most distinct pleasures of Beginners is the way it puts together fragments of someone's life-presumably the filmmaker's, although little does it matter-with humility, and without vying for some complete whole.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Costa
    Tomboy is one of those little big films whose simplicity and concision suggest the excess of meaning that language (cinematic or otherwise) could never account for.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Costa
    Alain Guiraudie's film portrays cruising as a danger-seeking and astoundingly repetitive affair, intimately linked to death itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    We experience the delay of the fantasy of the happy old couple in their country home in cinematic time as, for most of the film, the only body these lovers have is the spellbinding combination of visual fragments serving as apparitions to their voices.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Elite Squad: The Enemy Within is pure pedagogic bliss.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    The film captures Vreeland's perhaps unwitting philosophical integrity just as much as it drowns us in the exuberance of her work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Filmmakers Laura Amelia Guzmán and Israel Cárdenas have crafted a beautiful tale of alienation, solitude, and existential anxiety.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Cristián Jiménez's film knows how entangled the will to know is with the will to make love.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    A raw, sophisticated, and stomach-turning look at what it means to be a young woman in Serbia, what it means to be a woman tout court.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    It ever so subtly zeros in on the extreme particularities of a remote place to find something universal, or at the very least easily comprehensible about despair.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Slavoj Žižek manages to explain some of Lacanian psychoanalysis's most inscrutable notions with disarming clarity and infectious urgency.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Cruising for Alain Guiraudie seems to be the way of nature, a drive that doesn't discriminate.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    W.E.'s is a kind of dynamic pleasure that allows for non-shameful identification with the feminine and a fantasy of becoming what we see.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    An over-the-top Russian musical about hipsters set in 1950s Moscow, where getting a non-pastel-colored tie is a mafia-mediated operation and a saxophone is considered a concealed weapon? Yes, please.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Rampling is very much aware of the camera's every intention and possibility. Perhaps too aware, like the kind of over-educated narcissist for whom real spontaneity is too costly a risk.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    What's easy to appreciate in the documentary, however, is the way it reassembles the Dzi Croquettes' trajectory without polishing off its jagged edges. It's through their brilliance and their flaws that they become muses.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Its lightheartedness and overtly traditional narrative structure become a smart strategy for crafting what is ultimately a very nuanced political critique of capital.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    While We the Party can be insensitive, or blind, to the misogyny and homophobia of the general culture (the token gay teen is a finger-snapping, head-bobbing fashionista), it takes the issues of race and class quite seriously.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Hovering over the narrative is the fear of the domino effect that change can enact, the dread that one person's "queerness" may perhaps expose everyone else's.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film is at its best when it lingers on intimacy and the characters' incompetency to manage it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The hilarity of the film creeps up slowly and from every angle, not through the facile immediacy of short-lived laughter.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Its most redeeming quality is that it isn't so quick to neuter its queer characters into a package-friendly "gay couple" aesthetic a la Modern Family.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film is at its finest as a catalogue of Yossi's unspoken ache, less so when it begins to flirt with the clichés of the love story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    It often seems more intent on spelling out its awareness of the politics involved than in lingering on the aching human engaged in the libidinal transactions.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The documentary is committed not to some pseudo-factual documentary tradition, but to a more engaging realist poesis.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film provides welcome context for the semi-hysteria that recently took over the U.S. media in regard to Uganda's "Kill the Gays" bill.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    It's to Carine Roitfeld's own credit and director Fabien Constant's funky and frenetic pacing that the doc feels neither like a corporate hagiography nor like mere fashionista masturbation material.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Lee Isaac Chung's film exudes a wonderful sense of originality, a daring and organic playfulness rarely found in American indie cinema.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The documentary not only humanizes Ingmar Bergman as the absent lover-cum-father of everyday life, but works as a priceless oral history of cinema.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Gastón Solnicki's mapping out of his family's narrative from within never feels exploitative or self-absorbed.