For 115 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Costa's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Stranger by the Lake
Lowest review score: 0 Day of the Falcon
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 54 out of 115
  2. Negative: 41 out of 115
115 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    It often seems more intent on spelling out its awareness of the politics involved than in lingering on the aching human engaged in the libidinal transactions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The documentary is committed not to some pseudo-factual documentary tradition, but to a more engaging realist poesis.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film provides welcome context for the semi-hysteria that recently took over the U.S. media in regard to Uganda's "Kill the Gays" bill.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Lee Isaac Chung's film exudes a wonderful sense of originality, a daring and organic playfulness rarely found in American indie cinema.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    It's to Carine Roitfeld's own credit and director Fabien Constant's funky and frenetic pacing that the doc feels neither like a corporate hagiography nor like mere fashionista masturbation material.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Filmmaker Juan Manuel Echavarría's hands-off approach hinders us from mocking the believers' naïveté.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The documentary not only humanizes Ingmar Bergman as the absent lover-cum-father of everyday life, but works as a priceless oral history of cinema.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Gastón Solnicki's mapping out of his family's narrative from within never feels exploitative or self-absorbed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Driven by a no-nonsense ethos, the film avoids sentimentality the same way its main character avoids sentiment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Though it begins with the aesthetic and conceptual rigor of Blade Runner, it quickly veers toward the gratuitous outlandishness of a Bruce La Bruce film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    This is a film about the invisible things passed down from generation to generation, that nasty inheritance that cages us into patterns and puzzles we try to solve in someone else's name.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    For its general ludic obsession with all things generally thought of as disgusting, the German film Wetlands is stuck in the anal stage.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film refuses to tease us with suspense, overwhelm us with sentimentality, or defy us with nuance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Desiree Akhavan's tale of queer post-breakup funk shows more nuance, and racial dimension, than its cinematic cousins.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    It suggests that a disease isn't a product of one single person's body, but the eruption of an entire family history of unarticulated desire.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Queen of the Sun is honey pornography with an activist heart.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    The unconventional choice of extra-curricular activity for Luz sheds light onto the strange sport of powerlifting, in which teen girls are constantly weighed and sometimes told that they have 40 minutes to get three pounds off their bodies so they can compete.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    At the very least, The Pill could have been a pleasant exercise in screenwriting sharpness if Fred and Mindy's situation had been confined and (un-)resolved within the confines of its very promising first scene.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Director Casper Andreas does a good job conserving a simultaneous sense of disgust and attraction for the way big-city dreams end up stripping off wannabes from everything but their bodies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    The film works as a charming aesthetic exercise with its jerky camera and inadvertent cuts, as a contemplation on intergenerational female bonding.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    It's Jonathan Caouette's insistence in going back to his nightmarish old footage, or the old footage that he purposefully renders nightmarish, that seems more interesting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    An exposé of how the financial structures that make businesses possible in America seem to conspire against genuine good will and non-self-serving ambition.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    It's the moments when director Alan Brown stops worrying about clarifying plot and character motivation and lets the performances bring those into being that makes this an authentic project.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Mahdi Fleifel's usage of a domestic archive of home-video images inherited from his father lends the doc a simultaneous sense of historical gravitas and intimacy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Autoerotic's take on the me-me-me generation's inability for actual contact seems appropriate, but it lacks the nuance that makes "Denise Calls Up" so delicious to watch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The extreme largesse of Anselm Kiefer's project, his radical certainties and devotion, all call for a more intrusive probing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The figure of the poor white girl whose sex work is justified by a really noble cause, set of circumstances or sheer charisma, is, of course, not a new cinematic premise.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Cargo can feel like a "film about human trafficking" from beginning to end.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    While The First Rasta never goes beyond the surfaces of conventional documentary making of the most average kind, its reticence becomes whimsical every time the elderly interviewees break into song soon after reminiscing.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The tension between the amateurish interviewer and the star interviewees gives the documentary a layer of authenticity that its otherwise formulaic structure and storytelling fail to find.

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