For 109 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Costa's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Tomboy
Lowest review score: 0 The Moment
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 109
  2. Negative: 39 out of 109
109 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The documentary not only humanizes Ingmar Bergman as the absent lover-cum-father of everyday life, but works as a priceless oral history of cinema.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Gastón Solnicki's mapping out of his family's narrative from within never feels exploitative or self-absorbed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Driven by a no-nonsense ethos, the film avoids sentimentality the same way its main character avoids sentiment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Though it begins with the aesthetic and conceptual rigor of Blade Runner, it quickly veers toward the gratuitous outlandishness of a Bruce La Bruce film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    This is a film about the invisible things passed down from generation to generation, that nasty inheritance that cages us into patterns and puzzles we try to solve in someone else's name.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    For its general ludic obsession with all things generally thought of as disgusting, the German film Wetlands is stuck in the anal stage.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Queen of the Sun is honey pornography with an activist heart.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    The unconventional choice of extra-curricular activity for Luz sheds light onto the strange sport of powerlifting, in which teen girls are constantly weighed and sometimes told that they have 40 minutes to get three pounds off their bodies so they can compete.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    At the very least, The Pill could have been a pleasant exercise in screenwriting sharpness if Fred and Mindy's situation had been confined and (un-)resolved within the confines of its very promising first scene.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Director Casper Andreas does a good job conserving a simultaneous sense of disgust and attraction for the way big-city dreams end up stripping off wannabes from everything but their bodies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    The film works as a charming aesthetic exercise with its jerky camera and inadvertent cuts, as a contemplation on intergenerational female bonding.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    It's Jonathan Caouette's insistence in going back to his nightmarish old footage, or the old footage that he purposefully renders nightmarish, that seems more interesting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    An exposé of how the financial structures that make businesses possible in America seem to conspire against genuine good will and non-self-serving ambition.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    It's the moments when director Alan Brown stops worrying about clarifying plot and character motivation and lets the performances bring those into being that makes this an authentic project.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Mahdi Fleifel's usage of a domestic archive of home-video images inherited from his father lends the doc a simultaneous sense of historical gravitas and intimacy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Autoerotic's take on the me-me-me generation's inability for actual contact seems appropriate, but it lacks the nuance that makes "Denise Calls Up" so delicious to watch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The extreme largesse of Anselm Kiefer's project, his radical certainties and devotion, all call for a more intrusive probing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Cargo can feel like a "film about human trafficking" from beginning to end.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The tension between the amateurish interviewer and the star interviewees gives the documentary a layer of authenticity that its otherwise formulaic structure and storytelling fail to find.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye tries so hard to keep up with the quirkiness and theatricality of its subjects that it ends up canceling them out.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Sassy Pants has a slightly ludic atmosphere akin to another tale of teen alienation, Dear Lemon Lima, but it unfolds like a fable in which only Bethany doesn't feel like a canned caricature.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Without a consistent stylistic playfulness to match the histrionic scenarios, the action often feels just plain silly.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    It's as though the director, like his subjects, was too comfortable in the safe familiarity of the surface to find the place where it betrays us.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The film's moral lesson is too contradictory to be taken seriously.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    It would have been nice if the film had surrendered to its lunacy more blatantly, more carelessly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Instead of looking for depth or verisimilar romance, director Michael Mayer turns his characters into mere cogs in a pseudo-suspenseful thriller.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Juliette Binoche's face, as we know, can tell a million stories in a simple and brief rearrangement of her facial muscles.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    In Joe Swanberg's disaffected little film, the drama is never explicit, or even fully conscious.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Shana Betz's too-insistent refusal to commit to the melodramatic or to the suspenseful only makes the film seem like empty dramatization.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The film never explores the depths and nuances that could actually place Jobriath in conversation with figures who came after him, however reductively.