Diego Semerene

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For 168 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Semerene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Elle
Lowest review score: 0 Day of the Falcon
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 82 out of 168
  2. Negative: 63 out of 168
168 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Rampling is very much aware of the camera's every intention and possibility. Perhaps too aware, like the kind of over-educated narcissist for whom real spontaneity is too costly a risk.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film's denouement is at once shocking and organic because it echoes a well-paced but nasty children's fable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The documentary not only humanizes Ingmar Bergman as the absent lover-cum-father of everyday life, but works as a priceless oral history of cinema.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    It's to Carine Roitfeld's own credit and director Fabien Constant's funky and frenetic pacing that the doc feels neither like a corporate hagiography nor like mere fashionista masturbation material.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Agnieszka Smoczynska's film is most poignant when it simply stares at its own strangeness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The documentary is committed not to some pseudo-factual documentary tradition, but to a more engaging realist poesis.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Going back to the scene of trauma is a familiar Latin American strategy for dealing with its wars and dictatorships through art, but The Tiniest Place takes a disturbingly literal approach to such wound-scratching homecoming.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    It exploits the military aesthetics that lend themselves so well to breathtaking sounds and visuals without fetishizing them.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    W.E.'s is a kind of dynamic pleasure that allows for non-shameful identification with the feminine and a fantasy of becoming what we see.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Filmmaker Juan Manuel Echavarría's hands-off approach hinders us from mocking the believers' naïveté.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    While this uncataloguable and entrancing film gazes back in nostalgia to a time of performance-art priapism when everyone seems to have known Warhol, it also leaves room for a particularly hopeful diagnosis of the present.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Driven by a no-nonsense ethos, the film avoids sentimentality the same way its main character avoids sentiment.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film's structure, however stifling, is filled with gorgeous imagery and nuanced symbolism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Hovering over the narrative is the fear of the domino effect that change can enact, the dread that one person's "queerness" may perhaps expose everyone else's.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    A lighthearted critique on the fetishized notion of the "non-actor," the ethics (or lack thereof) of the "docudrama," and the packaging of national despair for exportation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Gastón Solnicki's mapping out of his family's narrative from within never feels exploitative or self-absorbed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Though it begins with the aesthetic and conceptual rigor of Blade Runner, it quickly veers toward the gratuitous outlandishness of a Bruce La Bruce film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Desiree Akhavan's tale of queer post-breakup funk shows more nuance, and racial dimension, than its cinematic cousins.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    An over-the-top Russian musical about hipsters set in 1950s Moscow, where getting a non-pastel-colored tie is a mafia-mediated operation and a saxophone is considered a concealed weapon? Yes, please.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The hilarity of the film creeps up slowly and from every angle, not through the facile immediacy of short-lived laughter.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The juxtaposition between the gorgeous natural beauty of a remote beach with the stubborn human need to escape somewhere, no matter what cost, is what really enthralls in the film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film provides welcome context for the semi-hysteria that recently took over the U.S. media in regard to Uganda's "Kill the Gays" bill.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    For its general ludic obsession with all things generally thought of as disgusting, the German film Wetlands is stuck in the anal stage.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    This is a film about the invisible things passed down from generation to generation, that nasty inheritance that cages us into patterns and puzzles we try to solve in someone else's name.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    It often seems more intent on spelling out its awareness of the politics involved than in lingering on the aching human engaged in the libidinal transactions.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Its lightheartedness and overtly traditional narrative structure become a smart strategy for crafting what is ultimately a very nuanced political critique of capital.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The drag in the film rejects the U.S.-centric obsession with "realness" and the acrobatics that come with it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film refuses to tease us with suspense, overwhelm us with sentimentality, or defy us with nuance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Writer-director Alanté Kavaité's film is a string of softly weaved pictorial metaphors steeped in reverie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    It suggests that a disease isn't a product of one single person's body, but the eruption of an entire family history of unarticulated desire.

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