For 108 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Costa's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Stranger by the Lake
Lowest review score: 0 Casa de mi Padre
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 108
  2. Negative: 38 out of 108
108 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Costa
    One of the most distinct pleasures of Beginners is the way it puts together fragments of someone's life-presumably the filmmaker's, although little does it matter-with humility, and without vying for some complete whole.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Costa
    Tomboy is one of those little big films whose simplicity and concision suggest the excess of meaning that language (cinematic or otherwise) could never account for.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Costa
    Alain Guiraudie's film portrays cruising as a danger-seeking and astoundingly repetitive affair, intimately linked to death itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    We experience the delay of the fantasy of the happy old couple in their country home in cinematic time as, for most of the film, the only body these lovers have is the spellbinding combination of visual fragments serving as apparitions to their voices.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Elite Squad: The Enemy Within is pure pedagogic bliss.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Filmmakers Laura Amelia Guzmán and Israel Cárdenas have crafted a beautiful tale of alienation, solitude, and existential anxiety.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Cristián Jiménez's film knows how entangled the will to know is with the will to make love.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    The film captures Vreeland's perhaps unwitting philosophical integrity just as much as it drowns us in the exuberance of her work.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    A raw, sophisticated, and stomach-turning look at what it means to be a young woman in Serbia, what it means to be a woman tout court.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    It ever so subtly zeros in on the extreme particularities of a remote place to find something universal, or at the very least easily comprehensible about despair.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Slavoj Žižek manages to explain some of Lacanian psychoanalysis's most inscrutable notions with disarming clarity and infectious urgency.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Cruising for Alain Guiraudie seems to be the way of nature, a drive that doesn't discriminate.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    Mitra Farahani rescues the doc from becoming a talking-head fest by embracing her creative self as a character and exposing the travails of her own authorship process.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Costa
    The pleasure in watching the film becomes a linguistic one as Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart masterfully sharpen their words and hurl them at each other like projectiles out of a blowpipe.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    An over-the-top Russian musical about hipsters set in 1950s Moscow, where getting a non-pastel-colored tie is a mafia-mediated operation and a saxophone is considered a concealed weapon? Yes, please.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Rampling is very much aware of the camera's every intention and possibility. Perhaps too aware, like the kind of over-educated narcissist for whom real spontaneity is too costly a risk.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    What's easy to appreciate in the documentary, however, is the way it reassembles the Dzi Croquettes' trajectory without polishing off its jagged edges. It's through their brilliance and their flaws that they become muses.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    W.E.'s is a kind of dynamic pleasure that allows for non-shameful identification with the feminine and a fantasy of becoming what we see.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Its lightheartedness and overtly traditional narrative structure become a smart strategy for crafting what is ultimately a very nuanced political critique of capital.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Hovering over the narrative is the fear of the domino effect that change can enact, the dread that one person's "queerness" may perhaps expose everyone else's.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    While We the Party can be insensitive, or blind, to the misogyny and homophobia of the general culture (the token gay teen is a finger-snapping, head-bobbing fashionista), it takes the issues of race and class quite seriously.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film is at its best when it lingers on intimacy and the characters' incompetency to manage it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The hilarity of the film creeps up slowly and from every angle, not through the facile immediacy of short-lived laughter.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Its most redeeming quality is that it isn't so quick to neuter its queer characters into a package-friendly "gay couple" aesthetic a la Modern Family.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film is at its finest as a catalogue of Yossi's unspoken ache, less so when it begins to flirt with the clichés of the love story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    It often seems more intent on spelling out its awareness of the politics involved than in lingering on the aching human engaged in the libidinal transactions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The documentary is committed not to some pseudo-factual documentary tradition, but to a more engaging realist poesis.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The film provides welcome context for the semi-hysteria that recently took over the U.S. media in regard to Uganda's "Kill the Gays" bill.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Lee Isaac Chung's film exudes a wonderful sense of originality, a daring and organic playfulness rarely found in American indie cinema.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    It's to Carine Roitfeld's own credit and director Fabien Constant's funky and frenetic pacing that the doc feels neither like a corporate hagiography nor like mere fashionista masturbation material.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    The documentary not only humanizes Ingmar Bergman as the absent lover-cum-father of everyday life, but works as a priceless oral history of cinema.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Gastón Solnicki's mapping out of his family's narrative from within never feels exploitative or self-absorbed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Driven by a no-nonsense ethos, the film avoids sentimentality the same way its main character avoids sentiment.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    Though it begins with the aesthetic and conceptual rigor of Blade Runner, it quickly veers toward the gratuitous outlandishness of a Bruce La Bruce film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    This is a film about the invisible things passed down from generation to generation, that nasty inheritance that cages us into patterns and puzzles we try to solve in someone else's name.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Costa
    For its general ludic obsession with all things generally thought of as disgusting, the German film Wetlands is stuck in the anal stage.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Queen of the Sun is honey pornography with an activist heart.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    The unconventional choice of extra-curricular activity for Luz sheds light onto the strange sport of powerlifting, in which teen girls are constantly weighed and sometimes told that they have 40 minutes to get three pounds off their bodies so they can compete.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    At the very least, The Pill could have been a pleasant exercise in screenwriting sharpness if Fred and Mindy's situation had been confined and (un-)resolved within the confines of its very promising first scene.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Director Casper Andreas does a good job conserving a simultaneous sense of disgust and attraction for the way big-city dreams end up stripping off wannabes from everything but their bodies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    The film works as a charming aesthetic exercise with its jerky camera and inadvertent cuts, as a contemplation on intergenerational female bonding.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    It's Jonathan Caouette's insistence in going back to his nightmarish old footage, or the old footage that he purposefully renders nightmarish, that seems more interesting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    An exposé of how the financial structures that make businesses possible in America seem to conspire against genuine good will and non-self-serving ambition.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    It's the moments when director Alan Brown stops worrying about clarifying plot and character motivation and lets the performances bring those into being that makes this an authentic project.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Costa
    Mahdi Fleifel's usage of a domestic archive of home-video images inherited from his father lends the doc a simultaneous sense of historical gravitas and intimacy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Autoerotic's take on the me-me-me generation's inability for actual contact seems appropriate, but it lacks the nuance that makes "Denise Calls Up" so delicious to watch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The extreme largesse of Anselm Kiefer's project, his radical certainties and devotion, all call for a more intrusive probing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Cargo can feel like a "film about human trafficking" from beginning to end.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The tension between the amateurish interviewer and the star interviewees gives the documentary a layer of authenticity that its otherwise formulaic structure and storytelling fail to find.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye tries so hard to keep up with the quirkiness and theatricality of its subjects that it ends up canceling them out.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Sassy Pants has a slightly ludic atmosphere akin to another tale of teen alienation, Dear Lemon Lima, but it unfolds like a fable in which only Bethany doesn't feel like a canned caricature.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Without a consistent stylistic playfulness to match the histrionic scenarios, the action often feels just plain silly.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    It's as though the director, like his subjects, was too comfortable in the safe familiarity of the surface to find the place where it betrays us.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The film's moral lesson is too contradictory to be taken seriously.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    It would have been nice if the film had surrendered to its lunacy more blatantly, more carelessly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Instead of looking for depth or verisimilar romance, director Michael Mayer turns his characters into mere cogs in a pseudo-suspenseful thriller.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Juliette Binoche's face, as we know, can tell a million stories in a simple and brief rearrangement of her facial muscles.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    In Joe Swanberg's disaffected little film, the drama is never explicit, or even fully conscious.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    Shana Betz's too-insistent refusal to commit to the melodramatic or to the suspenseful only makes the film seem like empty dramatization.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The film never explores the depths and nuances that could actually place Jobriath in conversation with figures who came after him, however reductively.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    The film's educational impetus is to announce to the world that even picture-perfect Norwegians continue to pay a heavy price for the horrors of WWII.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Costa
    It botches itself out of its own epic ambitions, an aesthetic slickness that seems to contradict, if not betray, its subject matter, and a maddeningly subdued critical spirit.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    Hood to Coast mostly suffers from an incessant soundtrack that stuffs the film with a peppiness that blocks the tragedy of its characters from view, as well as their overcoming it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    For a film so proud of its trail-blazing status ("the first 3D erotic movie"), 3d Sex and Zen is certainly driven by the same good old symptoms.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    In the documentary, the game is a make-believe war of pent-up frustrations linking race, nation, and manhood, one which teenage boys named Mohamed can actually win.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    Private Romeo feels more like a side project from the producers of Glee than some kind of novel queering of Shakespeare's text.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    Oh, the hilarious awkwardness of placing privileged white kids in a place where they don't belong.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    Though there's something refreshing, and disturbingly familiar, about Kevin Sheppard's spontaneity, he's certainly not the most interesting thing about the film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    A shallow film that leaves us knowing exactly what we're seeing, and able to predict what the characters will say to each other in the mostly uninspired and overtly familiar dialogue.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    Bruno Barreto's insistence that this pass for a product that Hollywood might have spawned smoothens a journey built on sharp edges.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    Sergio Castellitto's film quickly turns out to be more interested in reveling in the secrets of its storyline than in its sentiments.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Costa
    Whatever predictable plot the film tries to unfold never lives up to the excitement of its conceptual gimmick.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    Judging from The Sleeping Beauty, and the previous "Bluebeard," the provocations stop with the choice of the material, as the tone and style of these films are jarringly well-behaved.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    This time-tested project of tracing gayness back to when its shame was so explicitly enforced feels not only passé, and naïve, but mostly unproductive in a post-Judith Butler world in which drag queens are on TV teaching biological women how to better perform womanhood.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    The actors are left to go through the motions of a sterile script that director Dennis Lee tries to bring to life not through, for example, Watson's brilliant capacity for facial nuance, but through canned artifice.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    Taking the pedestrian and decidedly unsexy American male to Paris so he can become a sexual human being attuned to life's small pleasures is a tired device that perhaps only Woody Allen could possibly resurrect from the stinky pile of cinematic clichés.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    Having the far from goody-goody Kathleen Turner play a holier-than-thou mother bent on winning a devout church title is an inherently hilarious premise.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    The Samaritan treads a fine line between film-noir moodiness and crime-thriller triteness, mostly settling for the latter.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    While it lends itself to some interesting insight on the politics of non-exclusive, fuck-buddy dynamics, its characters are ultimately too one-dimensional and their dialogue too theatrical to sustain an involving cinematic experience.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    As hard as he tries, we never truly believe there's a lot at stake for Garner, who seems to cruise through America like a gringo taking a favela tour in Rio.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    Doug Langway's film is often too cheesy to, well, bear.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    There's no pointing toward something other than the work itself, no poetic digression, no suggestion of a conceptual dimensionality to the work being produced.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    A Man's Story does a major disservice to an artiste of fashion with a pretty amazing and prolific oeuvre by reducing him to a Bravo-like personality - a personality whose pettiness Boateng's work, though perhaps not his ego, clearly exceeds.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    In Our Nature's visual style seems plastered on or allocated, not developed with any sort of authorial singularity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    It produces a collection of one-dimensional facts strung together with an utmost respect for chronology and documentary-making's most stale conventions.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Costa
    If the film defies conventional form, it does so without the gravitas that conceptual cohesion brings, quickly rendering its experimentation into gratuitous aesthetic masturbation.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Costa
    One of the film's main problems is the fact that Shlain is so invested in connecting her father's scientific findings... with an astonishingly linear history of the world that she fails to see the more private connections that flicker in and out of her verbose voiceover.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Costa
    L!fe Happens wants us to believe its message is one of female independence and empowerment.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Costa
    The film has, at its source, a pool of affectations that so often constitute, or plague, American indie films--and, perhaps, American culture more generally.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Costa
    The film decides very early on, as part of its premise, to reduce Louisa Krause's King Kelly to a one-dimensional narcissist.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Costa
    Tammy Caplan and Joe Tyler Gold's film gives off the alienating feel of an inside joke that you miss in the off chance you're not part of the professional magic business.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Costa
    This is didactic self-help drivel of the worst kind, as filmmaker Rupam Sarmah creates a return-to-the-origin narrative contaminated by what Kathryn Bond Stockton would surely call "kid Orientalism."
    • 39 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Costa
    I'm not sure what part of Snowmen doesn't scream completely inappropriate, sentimental Manichean drivel.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Costa
    A Warrior's Heart is so inept at developing itself as a film that it hands in all of its devices to the soundtrack itself and becomes a music video.
    • Slant Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Costa
    You know a film isn't going to be considered high art when the guy to your left at the press screening is a reporter from Extra and the guy to your right lets out a loud "That's awesome, man" after each scene.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Costa
    There's an enormous amount of perverse pleasure to be had here for those who get off on the annihilation of nuance.
    • 1 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Costa
    For a film so bent on naturalizing the presumably hilarious incongruity of "the sexes," it sure features lots and lots of that site of horror: a naked male body. And for comedic purposes, of course.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Costa
    The film is a hybrid of a Lifetime movie focused on a "strong woman," a run-of-the-mill murder mystery, and a yogurt commercial from hell.