Dorothy Rabinowitz
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For 174 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dorothy Rabinowitz's Scores

Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Prohibition: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Graceland: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 13 out of 174
174 tv reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Forget the preposterousness of the plot -- it's easy enough to do -- and enjoy the suspense, of which there's plenty.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Smarter and snappier than one might have expected from a familiar sitcom premise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This series... is, for all its noise, sharply plotted, visually rich, heavily informed by intrigues and intriguing characters
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Slick and entertaining.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This is suspense that goes well beyond that of most medical shows.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Mad Men is infinitely more concerned with entertainment, an effort at which it succeeds, thanks mostly to its first-rate cast, disarming humor and period detail.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Their new effort--about a band of young careerists--shows considerable signs of promise along these lines, its depressing heroine notwithstanding.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Its semi-psychic hero is intriguing enough and confident enough--not everybody can sneak a hypnosis-inducing trance into an exchange with a reluctant witness as deftly as he can--to bring viewers under his spell.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Clearly, the creators of Filth (Amanda Coe, writer, Andy De Emmony, director) had their problems settling down to a comfortable tone for this figure who was, after all, famous entirely for her career on behalf of censorship. Julie Walters, who portrays her with grand and ebullient sympathy, shows evidence of no similar problems.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There's more than enough absurd charm in the show, meanwhile, to make the wait worthwhile.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The show's astringent tone, its excursions into low comedy--scenes like the one where everybody trying to diaper the baby ends up throwing up on her, and similarly stomach-churning fun--all work to counter the sentimentality of themes like this one. They work only in part here, and in this case that's all to the good. The show is meant to be a comedy, and it is--a smart and witty one--but there's no missing, either, under all that grotesquerie, its hard-core sweetness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    What this comedy has is the charm of its brash comic energy. That it's an energy located mostly in a single character, and not the main one either--officially, anyway-makes little difference.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It's not likely the audience for The Kennedys will be spending much time pondering what it was about this potent, lavishly produced eight-hour miniseries airing on ReelzChannel beginning Sunday night that caused former JFK speechwriter Ted Sorensen, self-described political activists like the filmmaker Robert Greenwald, and concerned others to go to so much trouble to get the project quashed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    With the second and third episodes ever more predictable, and, not least, with Martha's character gone flat under the weight of a preening righteousness. If bad scriptwriting were a prosecutable offense, Ms. Peake might have a case here. Still, episode one of Silk is smartly written and highly entertaining--a treat, in short, and at two hours a sumptuous one.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The film draws effectively on the power of two seductive performances--those of Nico Evers-Swindell as William and of Camilla Luddington as Kate Middleton....It's a familiar story and an entertaining one.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The fine cast, both regulars and guest stars, elevates the proceedings considerably.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It promises to be a journey that should draw plenty of viewers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It's Mr. Sutherland's portrayal of the father--unyielding in his effort to break through to his mute child and grasp what he's trying to say with his numbers--that is the heart of this story, the power likely to sustain this promising enterprise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A film that so deepens the dimensions of the known-all thanks to a masterful performance by Rob Lowe--it has the force and mystery of a new story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    An intriguing look at Americans with their own ideas of the purpose-driven life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There's a lot going on in Bent. A lot of absurdity, a lot of characters, and that vital thing, a lot of talent.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Think "Legally Blonde" meets "Working Girl." Kyle MacLachlan plays Martina's perceptive boss in this series, promising for its deft plotting and, perhaps above all, its high spirits.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This is a different series, one whose good start has to do with its capacity to be affecting, which it is in its picture of loss and longing--a sense this young Carrie projects persuasively.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The new Killing appears to have taken a sharp turn from the kind of emotional life that enriched the last season, with its drama of a disappeared daughter. In its portrait of family grief, beautifully nuanced to the end, the series landed a dramatic punch more potent than that of the key question, "Who killed Rosie?" Itself a mystery of considerable power, and one that the latest chapter of The Killing will have to go some way to equal.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A marvelously complex atmosphere of wartime tension hovers over the peacetime lives of these characters--no small saving grace in a script that includes the hunt for yet another tiresome serial killer/rapist with strange sexual tastes, now a staple of British television mysteries.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Ms. Heche's Beth is just madly menacing enough to keep things interesting.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    By the end of a few episodes everything meshes nicely, and the prospect of watching more has become enticing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There's a strange sense of distance in the picture here of a decade not exactly in the remote past, but there's also something sweetly enticing about its portrayal of relative innocence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    By the time the three episodes available for review end, a plot is thickening suspensefully, Blackbeard is exhibiting still more interesting propensities, and nobody can possibly mind not being able to figure out which woman in the Commodore's court is doing what with whom.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It requires a certain patience to stay with "Thief."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    "Justice" chugs along nicely, its plots gratifyingly tense, its dialogue sharp and uncluttered.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It ought to be said that this strange slice of life about three male cavepersons making their way in the workaday world has its charms, even for those of us who would have preferred a sitcom peopled by that lizard.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Thomas Jane and Tanya Skagle's performances aside, Hung remains, despite all efforts to inform it with larger meaning, trapped in being all about just what that title says.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This series, about an underground British antiterror team that has joined forces with U.S. Special Forces veteran Damien Scott (Sullivan Stapleton), does succeed in wresting plenty of high-level suspense out of these low-aiming scripts--no small miracle.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Substantial, atmospheric, a lure to lovers of mystery novels, though one undermined in the end by its predictable plot contortions.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It's an unpretentiously low-down sitcom about a female odd couple--morally speaking, that is--with characters sufficiently odd, plots that unfold with sufficient zest, to lure a viewer in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It is, in short, a busy, fearlessly idealistic president (Martin Sheen) who struts through the neatly packaged, frequently deft and invariably predictable first episode of NBC's The West Wing, If the series continues at this level -- continues, that is, being handsomely produced, polished and thoroughly unexceptional in its content and aspirations, it should stand a very good chance of winning a bunch of Emmys. [22 Sept 1999, p.A32]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The writing could be sharper, the vision less soft-headed.... That aside, there's no mistaking the sense of life and vitality that comes bouncing out of this series, or its cause -- namely, its two stars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    For the time being it's a hard slog.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There are aspects of the series that are engaging--Daniel's intricately conceived sleuthing for the FBI, for instance--but, as the voices in your own head soon tell you, there's a lot more of it that's wearisome.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It's a far superior piece of filmmaking [than Encore's Hindenburg: The Last Flight], impressive in its special effects, its dramatic displays of technical know-how in the face of unthinkable catastrophe caused, you will not be surprised to learn, by an avaricious driller.... The cookie-cutter quality of the sermonizing in these films is hard to miss.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It has its strengths--most of them derived from the skilled cast--but none related to any capacity for originality.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A docudrama, the REELZ film finds its focus in ballistics talk, much of it intriguing, and ballistics tests. Better yet, it manages to maintain a certain suspense--that having to do with the wait for the inevitable other shoe to fall. The time that invariably arrives in films of this kind, when documentary moves on to derangement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The series, unevenly written, frequently given to strange tonal lapses, is nevertheless lively, its dramatization of events abetted by its setting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    When not trapped in the effort to wring excitement from Fleming's adventurous sex life, the series rolls on compellingly with his spying adventures, his role in creating a special operations unit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    As Bruce meanders through these segments, determinedly inoffensive, the "Seinfeld" team's immortal notion via George Costanza--"let's do a sitcom about nothing"--comes to mind
    • 23 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    "10.5: Apocalypse," is visually dazzling, relentlessly hysterical and also a sequel, which means that most viewers sitting down to watch it know what they're getting into. That should damp down any untoward expectations -- the appearance of a believable character, for instance, or piece of dialogue, neither of which, be assured, is to be found here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    "Shark" suffers from a variety of flaws too numerous to detail here, not least its sentimentality, its wooden characters, its tin-eared dialogue.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Nagy's showy ventures in stylization, the raucous jokiness substituted for story are heavy encumbrances for this tale.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It has one thing going for it--the essential thing. That is, deft writing that yields the kind of suspense that causes people to want to know what comes next. That's no small achievement for a series whose characters are so entirely devoid of, yes, character--or anything resembling an interesting thought.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Less successful in the spinoff is what comes in between--the texture and character parts, the scripts heavy with pronouncements of the obvious and with horror plots whose strained premises are so elaborate they undercut the impact of all the gore and terror.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    From its looks so far, the new Leno show is the old Leno show. Even so, much remains to be seen of this enterprise, described as the hour that may change the nature of television.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The only bright light in this grimness is Mr. Piven's Ari--ever his electric self even in the middle of heartbreak (he's separated from his wife). Long may he shine.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    She's not funny, the aide is told--a line that elicited in this viewer a stream of unstoppable thoughts about what was not funny about this show, which is a lot, all of which ended up pointing, inexorably, to its writers. What saves the show is Ms. Louis-Dreyfus's Selina.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There didn't seem to be anything like [a plot] for the first two episodes, though there has been no lack of good looks, with Taylor Kinney and Jesse Spencer around and filling out their firemen togs nicely. Still there's hope. In episode three, to be exact, where we find a hint that the writers have caught on to the uses of a story line, this about a corrupt police detective.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A situation brimming with the potential for suspense, and irony. Those may yet emerge, if only someone produces a script to make it possible. For the moment, all that is brimming here is the evidence of an ill-advised faith in the drawing power of depressive police dramas.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There is no edge to Dancing on Edge, a drama sunk by its pretensions--one, to be sure, that does come clanking to life somewhat in a madly melodramatic final episode. A long wait, for little.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The real deficiency, the one that matters, that's evident in all of them is in the writing of comedy, the capacity to imagine characters--a lack impossible to overcome, and this case is no exception.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    House of Lies about the thievery of management consultants, manages to turn a theme with reasonable comedic potential into a vehicle for 16-year-old males, though dressed up as satire for sophisticates.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It's clear that Mr. Sorkin's main interest in The Newsroom runs to concerns other than characters and storytelling.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The problem is--as is ever the case in sitcoms with no future, and this is one of them--vapid writing and characters drawn according to formula.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The greatest problem for Ms. Gummer, and everyone else in the cast, has to do with the script, a terminal case of the well-known vacant mind disorder, to which large quarters of the TV writing world are, it would seem, particularly susceptible.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Lots of hearts are likely to harden in resistance to the calculated grimness, the nightmarish images. Not to mention the preening incoherence that pervades this script based on a novel by Tom Perrotta, a work whose measured tone bears no resemblance whatever to the goings on here.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 20 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The main deadly force in Eli Stone is its scripts, which are ever so spritely in tone, ever so dumb in essence.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The creators can be held responsible for enlarging the quantity of execrably written works on this theme [gay-themed sitcoms].
    • 19 Metascore
    • 10 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    To sit through these four hours is to deserve compensation.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 10 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The only suspects of interest in this crime series are the producers and writers who threw this hapless business together and called it "Prime Suspect."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 10 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Government agents loll around the beach, exchanging the kind of banter for which television writers would, in a just world, be sent to some quiet place to reflect on their idiocy. All this, amid the plotting of incoherent designs to trap drug dealers, and plenty of sand and dazzling blue skies--elements that have on occasion succeeded in mitigating the flaws of some deadly TV series. This deadly series isn't one of them.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 10 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The question is, who's laughing? Worth asking along with the aforementioned curiosity about what the programmers were thinking, not only about this mother but all the rest of this unutterably mirthless enterprise--the dim-witted father (Beau Bridges), too stupid to use a telephone properly, included.