For 40 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 14.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Drew Hunt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 45
Highest review score: 75 This Ain't California
Lowest review score: 12 Reclaim
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 40
  2. Negative: 21 out of 40
40 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    Eleanor Burke and Ron Eyal's film is a tasteful, well-orchestrated drama that never reaches beyond its humble means.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    While the film is deeply romantic and nostalgic, possessing a genuine reverence for youth and rebellion, it's also something of a tragedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    Markus Imhoof's film reveals itself as a curious, audacious mix of personal essay film and nature documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    The film is made impetuously watchable and disarmingly emotional by the filmmakers' strong command of docudrama and nonfiction narrative style.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    Sinister, comical, aggravating, and audacious, Calvin Lee Reeder's film is nothing short of an affront.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    In its elliptical presentation of its characters' lives, brings to mind the latter-day films of Philippe Garrel, but Kees Van Oostrum's genre experimentation aligns him with Paul Verhoeven.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    The film benefits greatly from this bait-and-switch narrative design, as Hoss-Desmarais dials down or otherwise forgoes exposition, backstory, and character development in favor of an ambiguous, almost ethereal dramaturgical approach.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    More than just a thorough examination of hardcore pornography, Christina Voros's doc is also a sort of chronicle of the filmmaking process.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    Taylor Guterson's film offers thoughtful, if familiar, comments on friendship, self-doubt, and romantic angst.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    Perhaps the first important film about street hoops, even if the overall product struggles from a lack of focus.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    More than some run-of-the-mill social-awareness doc, the film pays as much attention to the personal and emotional strife of its subjects as it does to their activism.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    The filmmakers certainly exaggerate (i.e. exploit) their subject, but for a community that prides itself on shock value, there seems no sufficient alternative.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    Good, clean genre entertainment, the sort of harmless yet endearing brand of moviemaking seemingly unattainable in today's Hollywood system.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    The film is at its most fascinating when Jackie Stewart authoritatively and pedagogically discusses the nuances of his trade.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    The film exhibits strong character interplay and resides in an unconventional milieu, in effect turning rote material into something that feels decidedly eccentric.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    As Renny Harlin's career progresses, it seems more and more that his early gems were merely happy accidents.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    Sini Anderson's film may be another unimaginative fan letter, but at least Kathleen Hannah is worthy of such devotion.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    The film's various references to other stylistic touchstones, while thematically apt, rarely carry any sort of critical inquiry.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    Florian Habicht unwisely shifts his focus from Sheffield and its unique denizens to the band's personal history, effectively turning the film into an episode of Behind the Music.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    Its views on organized religion are so halfhearted and perfunctory as to make Kevin Smith's Dogma seem like a veritable master's class in theistic studies.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    Ryuhei Kitamura's latest genre bloodbath is par for the course, in spite of the occasionally flourish of interesting subtext.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    The overall product doesn't reveal anything about its subject that a Wikipedia page couldn't do just as well.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    Its blind reverence toward the Russian mythos is so grandiose that it becomes impossible to rescue it from self-importance, and as such President Putin would likely give it two big thumbs up.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    In the end, considering the numerous ways the film goes limp, it seems credibility still eludes the found-footage genre.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    It's easy to see how Daniel Simpson's desire to return the found-footage genre to its roots resulted in cheap imitation.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    The political dynamic that underpins The Rules of the Game is nonexistent in 1st Night, which is fixated entirely on the zany sexcapades of its characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Heaven Is for Real is by Christians, for Christians, and deliberately, if subtly, antagonistic toward everyone else.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    As far as derivative crime sagas go, Paul Borghese's film might represent the new gold standard of shameless barrel-scraping.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Themes of family ties, obsession, and morality, so dramatically realized in Conviction, are gracelessly and shapelessly strewn together here.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    BJ McDonnell, too hesitant to stray from the beaten path set by Green's previous films, lacks the looser, more whimsical hand that would have allowed Hatchet III to transcend its thoughtlessly imitative state.

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