For 47 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 71% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 16.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Drew Hunt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 43
Highest review score: 75 Kink
Lowest review score: 12 I Will Follow You Into the Dark
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 47
  2. Negative: 27 out of 47
47 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    Markus Imhoof's film reveals itself as a curious, audacious mix of personal essay film and nature documentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    More than just a thorough examination of hardcore pornography, Christina Voros's doc is also a sort of chronicle of the filmmaking process.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    Eleanor Burke and Ron Eyal's film is a tasteful, well-orchestrated drama that never reaches beyond its humble means.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    The film is made impetuously watchable and disarmingly emotional by the filmmakers' strong command of docudrama and nonfiction narrative style.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    While the film is deeply romantic and nostalgic, possessing a genuine reverence for youth and rebellion, it's also something of a tragedy.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    In its elliptical presentation of its characters' lives, brings to mind the latter-day films of Philippe Garrel, but Kees Van Oostrum's genre experimentation aligns him with Paul Verhoeven.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    Sinister, comical, aggravating, and audacious, Calvin Lee Reeder's film is nothing short of an affront.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    The film benefits greatly from this bait-and-switch narrative design, as Hoss-Desmarais dials down or otherwise forgoes exposition, backstory, and character development in favor of an ambiguous, almost ethereal dramaturgical approach.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Drew Hunt
    The cogent character study nestled inside all the bombast remains crafty for its rare commingling of artful storytelling and genre nonsensicality.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    The film exhibits strong character interplay and resides in an unconventional milieu, in effect turning rote material into something that feels decidedly eccentric.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    Good, clean genre entertainment, the sort of harmless yet endearing brand of moviemaking seemingly unattainable in today's Hollywood system.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    Taylor Guterson's film offers thoughtful, if familiar, comments on friendship, self-doubt, and romantic angst.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    More than some run-of-the-mill social-awareness doc, the film pays as much attention to the personal and emotional strife of its subjects as it does to their activism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    The film is at its most fascinating when Jackie Stewart authoritatively and pedagogically discusses the nuances of his trade.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    Perhaps the first important film about street hoops, even if the overall product struggles from a lack of focus.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Drew Hunt
    The filmmakers certainly exaggerate (i.e. exploit) their subject, but for a community that prides itself on shock value, there seems no sufficient alternative.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    Florian Habicht unwisely shifts his focus from Sheffield and its unique denizens to the band's personal history, effectively turning the film into an episode of Behind the Music.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    The film's various references to other stylistic touchstones, while thematically apt, rarely carry any sort of critical inquiry.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    As Renny Harlin's career progresses, it seems more and more that his early gems were merely happy accidents.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Drew Hunt
    Sini Anderson's film may be another unimaginative fan letter, but at least Kathleen Hannah is worthy of such devotion.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    This big, brash, occasionally clever, but mostly dumb comedy is so gallingly derivative that watching it feels like playing a game of basic-cable bingo.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    Its blind reverence toward the Russian mythos is so grandiose that it becomes impossible to rescue it from self-importance, and as such President Putin would likely give it two big thumbs up.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    Ryuhei Kitamura's latest genre bloodbath is par for the course, in spite of the occasionally flourish of interesting subtext.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    Its views on organized religion are so halfhearted and perfunctory as to make Kevin Smith's Dogma seem like a veritable master's class in theistic studies.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    It's easy to see how Daniel Simpson's desire to return the found-footage genre to its roots resulted in cheap imitation.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    The overall product doesn't reveal anything about its subject that a Wikipedia page couldn't do just as well.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Drew Hunt
    In the end, considering the numerous ways the film goes limp, it seems credibility still eludes the found-footage genre.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    BJ McDonnell, too hesitant to stray from the beaten path set by Green's previous films, lacks the looser, more whimsical hand that would have allowed Hatchet III to transcend its thoughtlessly imitative state.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    As far as derivative crime sagas go, Paul Borghese's film might represent the new gold standard of shameless barrel-scraping.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Commingling industry shoptalk with introspective insights and wrangling testimonials, the film casts an incredibly wide net, but doesn't reveal much of anything.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Aside from being another rote addition to the revenge-film canon, John Stockwell's In The Blood is also a supreme waste of Gina Carano's talent.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Ian Softley is far too interested in the minutia of the plot to bother with the Chabrolian elements of bourgeois excess or the Hitchcockian themes of mistaken identity.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Its thinly veiled message of social conservatism and religious affirmations as the pathway to an ideal life is delivered with all the predigested sentimentality of a Hallmark card.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Strands of Simon Pegg's amiable persona are found in the film's more tolerable bits, but even this seasoned vet's unique voice is lost amid the glut of references to other work.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    The filmmakers largely stand out of Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart's way, but they also refuse to modulate the story's racial humor with any sense of subversion.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    This third and supposedly final edition in the franchise is nothing more than an uncomfortably transparent contractual obligation.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Themes of family ties, obsession, and morality, so dramatically realized in Conviction, are gracelessly and shapelessly strewn together here.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Robin Williams once again proves he can insufferably crank the energy to 11 without batting an eye, only this time his frenzied comic demeanor is replaced with equally harried contempt.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    The film's dialogue is knowing and the action sequences are elaborate, but not only in ways that advance the shady story toward its hokey denouement.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    The characters shout themselves hoarse, but they don't really say anything, and it isn't long before we feel like hostages ourselves, bound by the filmmakers' strained moral outrage.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    The political dynamic that underpins The Rules of the Game is nonexistent in 1st Night, which is fixated entirely on the zany sexcapades of its characters.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    The filmmakers are content to idealize everyone's unchecked narcissism and idle privilege--an inquiry-free recipe for disaster in an age when the American wealth gap is wider and more detrimental than ever.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    Heaven Is for Real is by Christians, for Christians, and deliberately, if subtly, antagonistic toward everyone else.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Drew Hunt
    The film's tired sentimentality aside, its general lack of empathy is most damning.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 12 Drew Hunt
    A moralistic ending is telegraphed from the beginning and routinely fulfilled by the end, rendering the rest of this trite, visually unappealing mess virtually worthless.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 12 Drew Hunt
    Reclaim's highly mechanized plot ensures that the film is over before it even ends.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 12 Drew Hunt
    Because it actively defies and outright ridicules all notions of aesthetic intent, proper form, and moral propriety, this lazy Z-film pastiche is essentially impervious to standard critical evaluation.

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