For 96 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 28% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ed Gonzalez's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 49
Highest review score: 100 Under the Skin
Lowest review score: 12 Nurse 3D
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 96
  2. Negative: 40 out of 96
96 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ed Gonzalez
    In the Mood For Love is ravishing beyond mortal words.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ed Gonzalez
    Her
    A screwball surrealist comedy that asks us to laugh at an unconventional romance while also disarming us with the realization that its fantasy scenario isn't too far from our present reality.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ed Gonzalez
    Throughout, what truly matters to director Jonathan Glazer is articulating through visual and aural enticement the unconscious power of our death drive.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ed Gonzalez
    It's in his generous, objective use of long shots and spare but startling close-ups that we see once again the influence of Robert Altman in Yang's aesthetic and the struggle of the Taiwanese people to accept their history. In essence, Yang uses his aesthetic to bring into the light that which is dark.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    In its stripped-down realism and blistering fixation on its main character's grappling with life and mortality, the film is kin to Roberto Rossellini's collaborations with Ingrid Bergman.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    With The Devil's Backbone, Del Toro pulls an Amenábar by dishing out sophisticated war commentary with bone-chilling dread.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    This lovely film is ultimately an articulation of something at once simple and universal: the discontent of traveling through life with sad resignation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    Benh Zeitlin's lived-in, almost abstract sense of social realism is partly what makes the film so refreshing and uniquely affecting.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    The Tree of Life's fetching images are like glowing shards of glass, and together they form a grandiose mirror that reflects Malick's impassioned philosophical outlook. It's unquestionably this great filmmaker's most personal work, a revelation of how he came to be, why he creates, and where he feels he's going.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    Though it's as schematic in construction as "Incendies," the film doesn't grind along to a ponderous plot; it's unnerving abstraction of its subject matter more daringly relays Villeneuve's view of the human cost of gender warfare.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    It thrills in seeing dumb people getting their due in hyper-stylized displays of violence, and yet it never feels contemptuous of them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Passion is a serpentine, gorgeously orchestrated gathering of all of De Palma's pet themes and conceits, a symphony of giddy terror where people perpetually hide behind masks, both literal and figurative.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    One doesn't have to look too closely at Carnage's final shot to marvel at the way Polanski refuses to haughtily indict his audience in the pettiness of his characters' behavior.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Richard Linklater's film is an experiment in time, and one that's attentive to the audience's sense of empathy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Abdellatif Kechiche reveals through his sense of composition, and collaboration with his remarkable actresses, a sensitivity to emotional nuance that's striking.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    To dismiss it as simply an act of hipster appropriation is to cop out, because appropriation is the film's thematic meat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Raimi's script is riotously deadpan, his compositions undeniably breathtaking and inventive. [6 March 2002]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    More than just a relationship drama of striking specificity, this is a naked confession about addiction.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Its audio-visual overload testifies to a group of filmmakers' belief that some films are made to be remade.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    David's perversity as a character is mostly disarming for how it illuminates the sadness with which a foe can so readily be confused for a savior.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Leap Year is a story of survival, and its poised aesthetic is remarkably keyed to its main character's shell-like behavior.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    The Dardennes believe in human value and social order being rooted in a sense of solidarity, a staggering consciousness of community that brims with a sensitivity to place, movement, and emotion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    The film, still only clearing its throat, hints at a wellspring of emotional riches to come.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    If the series really does end here, may this final installment be hailed as a triumph of poetic justice.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Though visionary, David Robert Mitchell's film abounds in undigested ideas and dubious sexual politics.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    I Killed My Mother is a film best heard than seen, as the earnest, nimble scrubbiness of Dolan's screenplay is ill-served by his conceited visuals, an aesthetic mode that feels insecurely borrowed from perfume commercials and the work of Jean-Luc Godard and Wong Kar-Wai.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    One of the minor triumphs of this Fright Night remake is Farrell's coolly assured performance, a cocksure spectacle of masculine virility far more intimidating to his character's victims, male and female alike, than the razor-sharp fangs Jerry uses to munch on human neck meat.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Its ostentatious sense of horror -- think later-day Argento -- is far from suggestive, though some of its queasier moments effectively tap into our fears of not-so-bygone forms of invasive physical therapy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Eugenio Mira thrills in watching his main character attempt to worm his way out of a most unusual hostage situation, synching his indulgences of style to the pianist's wily physical maneuvering.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Matthias Hoene allows the cockney swears to flow as deliriously as the truly convincing blood splatter, offering a few unexpected gut-busters along the way.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film busts a fierce move but never relishes the unique cultural essence that its gentrifying baddie threatens to snuff out.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film is dizzyingly creepy in its refracting of horrors through the cascading windows of computer programs we've come to understand more intimately than our own selves.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    This is a beautiful vision, but in telling too many flowery secrets, it's also one that unnecessarily keeps its queerness in the closet.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Una Noche tugged at my heartstrings, but the film's almost phantasmagoric fixation on sex can feel crass and dehumanizing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    While Jim Mickle's compositions lose much of their verve in the film's later half, his regard for the analog does not--and at the expense of perspective into his characters' emotional torque.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    DeMonaco may doubly, sometimes triply, underline the story's governing theme of social power and how it's exchanged, but the rage and lucidity of these ideas resonate.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The states get higher with every breadcrumb Luis Tosar's creep lays down, and the film derives sometimes remarkable corkscrew tension from watching him being backed into a corner.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    An anthology of found-footage horror shorts that exudes, sometimes extraordinarily, a neophyte's sense of courage and cluelessness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Throughout To the Wonder, the new and old are incessantly twinned, blurred into a package that suggests an experimental dance piece.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    It keeps us at a remove that becomes telling of the filmmaker's reticence to explore whatever feelings of isolation and yearning may inform his main character's grisly compulsion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The difference between Niels Arden Oplev's adaptation of Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and David Fincher's own is not, as some might have hoped, the difference between night and day, but between curdled milk and a warmed-over holiday second.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Despite its flaws, the film is at least a consistent vision, attesting through both its story and animation to the rabbi's right to be different while also striving for human solidarity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    This spirited enough yarn is sincere and heartening in its belief that our devotion to these youthful myths is healthy for our sense of wonderment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Through a mini-triumph of montage, what begins as run-of-the-mill backstory vomit is thrillingly repackaged as an almost-Lynchian duet between warring states of consciousness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Save for its loving, plaintive, and thorough tour of the seldom-filmed East L.A., A Better Life is, top to bottom, derivative-of Polanski in its direction and of "Bicycle Thieves" in its plot (even Alexandre Desplat's gussy score suggests Angelo Badalamenti playing Mariachi Night).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Guillermo del Toro doesn't rise above the obligations of staging a film of this sort as a multi-level video game, a stylish but programmatic ride toward an inevitable final boss battle.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The literalizing of Ivan Locke's hidden self and his inability to master it ultimately exposes the film as the squarest kind of theater: drama therapy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film exudes a sense of fleetingness; however static these lives may be, Tian's narrative perfectly evokes a changing season.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film struggles against the rigid formula that typifies the Marvel universe, but only does so up to a point.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    It's important to talk at length about Pariah's aesthetic because of how it distracts from the emotional truthfulness of the sometimes heartbreaking, by and large gorgeously performed story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Carlos Reygadas's latest, an almost impossibly intellectual film, keeps us at a remove that's as striking as that which separates its main character from the lower classes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    This is a Hollywood-delivered chronicle of the immigrant experience that earns its justification through good will and tact.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Like Magic Mike, Side Effects is enlivened by Soderbergh's jazzy style and laidback moralism, bringing to mind the work of another connoisseur of genre, Robert Altman.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Writer-director Charles Martin Smith's tin ear for dialogue and contrived symbolism is as unmistakable as his enormous heart.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Forlorn depictions of love and death may dignify Neil Jordan's film, but narrative withholding ultimately drives a stake into its unmistakable heart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Take This Waltz is full of chance encounters, some less likely than a lobby with nine hundred windows or a bed where the moon has been sweating.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Possibly year's most immaculate-looking drivel, a prismatically shot whodunit abundant in red herrings, but lacking in moral contemplation.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Léos Carax's maddening, self-satisfied, though never smug, game of spot-the-reference seems intended only for a particular type of cinephile.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Its ideas are paralleled, its themes twinned, sometimes breathlessly, sometimes fatuously, into what may be described as a 164-minute pop song of seemingly infinite verses, choruses, and bridges. Perhaps expectedly, it soars as often as it thuds.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Bobcat Goldthwait exposes the characteristic male pursuit of power to which females are often made subservient.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    If the stock concessions made to genre cliché by The Woman in Black can be charitably viewed as deliberate tips of the hat to the heyday of Hammer Films, then John Pogue's period-set exorcism yarn The Quiet Ones more interestingly upends those tropes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Less a sincerely kooky elegy to lost time than a slightly off-kilter acting out of familiar rom-com bona fides about commitment-phobes missing out on life.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    It conveys life experience to such a sentimentalized degree that the world comes to resemble only the sham of a Norman Rockwell painting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Opting for inspiration over insight, Venus and Serena is a starry-eyed pop documentary that cannot transcend its scattershot, for-fans-only filmmaking.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The filmmaker looks to American modes of visual and aural expression to give Happy, Happy its soul, but all her fetish accomplishes is depersonalizing her story, making a sitcom of her character's lives.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The result is an alternately gripping and dully meandering patchwork of these soldiers' stay in the Korengal that pointedly shuns big-picture philosophizing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Since Bart's bloodlust is never matched in tenor by his righteousness, the story remains rife with unfulfilled moral inquiry.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Every shot is painstakingly thought out, but less emphasis is placed on the human face than on the surfaces that reflect it and the objects that obscure it, and the overall effect is close to that of fetish art.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    That it half succeeds, in spite of its cloying self-seriousness, means that it's at best a convincing copycat of a definitive expression of ego and influence in art.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Even the logos for the companies involved in its making (Sherwood Films and Affirm Films) and distribution (TriStar Pictures) scream that this will be a message from on high.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Benjamín Ávila structures the film as a series of precious moments, remembrances of a difficult year when the politics of patria and family got in the way of his puppy love.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The lusterless camerawork keys itself almost empathetically to the drab reality of the film's spaces, settled and unsettled alike, but it can't enliven the hackneyed plot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The poetic, referential succession of near-still images that opens the film so immaculately distills Melancholia's moody narrative and themes that it makes the two-hours-plus that follow seem impossibly redundant.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    A shallow romanticization of Batista-era Cuba -- when the nation was a tropical paradise for the delectation of American jetsetters -- and what the revolution left in its wake.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The constant foregrounding of so much well-executed incident only works to shortchange the heroes' yearnings and anxieties.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Given the liberties the film takes, it's surprising that it refuses to penetrate Alan Turing's carnality and allow Benedict Cumberbatch to truly wrestle with the torment of the man's sexuality.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Martin Campbell, though a capable director of action (Hal's training session with the Michael Clarke Duncan-voiced Kilowog is proof of that), doesn't have a poet's instincts.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Its stance toward every dipshit slasher and creature-horror flick that's come before it never feels less than casually hostile.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Like the film that constrains him, a prequel to Planet of the Apes, perhaps James Franco understands his performance as something that will one day evolve into something far greater.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The film is beholden to a strange internal logic that gives primacy not to its protagonist's suffering, but to its maker's thirst for fun.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Though The Conjuring claims to be based on a true story, in truth it's based on every horror film that's come before it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The titular signal refers to the Nomad hacker's taunts, though it may as well point to the film's nature as a self-styled calling card.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    For a spell, the film gets by on its unpretentious flair for atmosphere, even its disconcerting nonsensicality.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The film ends up cheapening its sense of empathy in its final mad rush to subject audiences to every incarnation of the jump scare imaginable.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Steve McQueen's film practically treats Solomon Norhtup as passive observer to a litany of horrors that exist primarily for our own education.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    In the end, more than just the machine remains an enigma.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Irony is a popular pose struck throughout these shorts, which are less revealing of the existentialist despair that death often rouses than they are of their makers' prejudices.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Charlie Paul isn't content to let his stock footage and interviewees lead for him, driven as he is to "make something out of a frame of mind," though to needlessly busy effect.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    For a story so unconventional, it's executed without director Alexandre Aja's typical commitment to anarchic awe.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The film predictably alternates in scaring its characters by tapping into their deepest fears and having them rub shoulders with the relics of a past that insists on being undisturbed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Meticulous in its adherence to conventional narrative inducement, this biopic only offers a sanded-down and embossed vision of Stephen Hawking and Jane Wilde's 30-year marriage.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Though the film is light on anthropomorphization, its aesthetic is nothing if not infantile.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Marc Forster regards the real-life Childers's evolution from heroin-addicted, wife-beating (implied), gun-toting oblivion to born-again do-gooderism with motorized aloofness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Haneke's admonishments are disturbing only in the sense that they're never self-critical, and while watching one of his films, there's always a sense that he thinks he's above his characters, his audience, and scrutiny.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Xan Cassavetes cops to nothing more significant than being more keen on Vampyros Lesbos than anyone else from her clan of famous cinephiles.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    There's a comic streak to the film that suggests David Fincher may understand the material as trash, but it's the kind of affectation that only reinforces, rather than dulls, its insults.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The film's weird mix of dollhouse dread and fashion-magazine chic can be fetching, but it's nothing if not vacuous, a series of disjointed, improvisatory riffs that recall the brazen aesthetic overload of Amer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    As feminist fantasy, the film is non-committal, and as a reimagining of the fairy tale, it's at best expensive-looking without seeming wantonly so.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Shame articulates a shallow, even mundane, understanding of an uninteresting man's sex addiction-in a vibrant city rendered dull and anonymous.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The film straddles a very awkward line between creature feature, conspiracy thriller, and domestic drama, all without novelty or suspense.

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