For 122 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 23% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ed Gonzalez's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 100 Under the Skin
Lowest review score: 12 Strange Magic
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 37 out of 122
  2. Negative: 55 out of 122
122 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Cary Joji Fukunaga’s artistry registers less as psychological imprint than as a measure of his professional bona fides.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The tacky and loose means by which the platitudinous screenplay dances around what ails the story's football players is just one cog in a whirligig of pat representations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Shame articulates a shallow, even mundane, understanding of an uninteresting man's sex addiction-in a vibrant city rendered dull and anonymous.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The film straddles a very awkward line between creature feature, conspiracy thriller, and domestic drama, all without novelty or suspense.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    In the wake of Bobcat Goldthwait's Wolf Creek, Exists's metaphorical ambitions are as under-realized as its story-circumscribing use of found footage.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    At the center of the film is a conservative lesson that asks us to unquestioningly abide by society's capitalistic impulses.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Mac Carter repeatedly compromises his intuitive, and often elegantly framed, glances at his main characters' teenage blues by too busily going through amateur-night gesticulations of spooking his audience.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The film's relentless turning of its characters' experience into platitudes and homilies is served for our too-easy consumption.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    One wishes it had spared us the remedial theorizing on media culture and artistic representation and license and less apologetically acted the part of a straight-up horror film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    In so clearly viewing Lili through the lens of 21st-century political correctness, the film only blunts the resolve of her struggle.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    A jump scare isn't just a jump scare in the films of Scott Derrickson, which isn't to say this wannabe master of horror has entirely perfected the art of sudden dread.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The film's sense of conviction and psychological nuance never rises above that of the "I Learned It from Watching You" anti-drug PSA.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Whatever scant insight the prior films offered into Spain's waning Catholic belief has now been entirely replaced by fascist, cartoonish shows of wish-fulfillment prevarication.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Fraulein almost entirely shuns backstory, coloring around the lives of its characters with ostentatious style (in this case, fuzzy-wuzzy visual vibes and music tailored to each character’s generation) and hoping audiences won’t mind filling in the blanks.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The collection of clever quips on parade here are both tiresome and predictable.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The film's corporate blandness is almost as dispiriting as its disinterest in exploiting the inherent saliency of the material.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    One can never fully shake the feeling that the sense of unease the filmmakers rouse, every act of seduction, infiltration, and vengeance they orchestrate, is borrowed.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    In Xavier Gens's The Divide, the revolution will not be televised, only the degradation of human civility--and in a mire of clichés more toxic to the mind than the radioactive dust that causes everyone's hair to fall out in the wake of a nuclear explosion.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    At least the irony with which this transparently written and dispassionately aestheticized film so demagogically argues for the value of words and pictures is brutally convincing.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The cacophony of visions, broken mirrors, and mutilations only points to the ghost in the machine respecting The Craft as its spirit animal.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The story, more a tangle of violent, symbolic gestures, regards economic exploitation with fetishistic, impossibly overdetermined abandon.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    God bless Robert Duvall. An American cinematic institution, our greatest living actor makes the fortune-cookie bromides of Matthew Dean Russell's Seven Days in Utopia sound like Yates.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The film squanders the promise of its scrutiny into how people recalibrate their sense of morality in times of crisis.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Does Katie Holmes's hubby get script-doctoring rights even on her own film projects? That would explain why Troy Nixey's inane Don't Be Afraid of the Dark, co-written and produced by Guillermo del Toro, at times suggests an anti-Rx PSA.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    A rote home-invasion thriller afraid to be seen as just another rote home-invasion thriller, the film turgidly grasps for profundity by framing bloodlust as patriotic duty.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Like the show, this boring, lazy, clumsily staged, overly lit, unnecessarily 3D-ed contraption even culminates with some half-hearted moral hectoring-in this case, the togetherness of the Smurfs works to validate heteronormative values.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Unlike David Lynch, Ivan Kavanagh isn't interested in catching ideas like fish, of linking the degradation of film to the degradation of consciousness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Julianne Moore and Kristen Stewart's artful consideration of familial friction acerbated by disease, and vice versa, nearly saves Still Alice from the banality of its Lifetime-movie execution.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    The purpose of Lynne Ramsay's hodgepodge approach is to distract us from the flimsiness of a story that suggests a snide art-house take on "The Omen."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    A few jolting scares are deployed throughout, but more difficult to shake is how the story's overacting lambs walk a rather programmatic path toward slaughter--or at least anal probing.

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