For 56 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ed Gonzalez's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 In the Mood for Love
Lowest review score: 12 Nurse 3D
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 56
  2. Negative: 18 out of 56
56 movie reviews
    • 99 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Richard Linklater's film is an experiment in time, and one that's attentive to the audience's sense of empathy.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Steve McQueen's film practically treats Solomon Norhtup as passive observer to a litany of horrors that exist primarily for our own education.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ed Gonzalez
    Her
    A screwball surrealist comedy that asks us to laugh at an unconventional romance while also disarming us with the realization that its fantasy scenario isn't too far from our present reality.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Abdellatif Kechiche reveals through his sense of composition, and collaboration with his remarkable actresses, a sensitivity to emotional nuance that's striking.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The film exudes a sense of fleetingness; however static these lives may be, Tian's narrative perfectly evokes a changing season.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ed Gonzalez
    In the Mood For Love is ravishing beyond mortal words.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    The literalizing of Ivan Locke's hidden self and his inability to master it ultimately exposes the film as the squarest kind of theater: drama therapy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ed Gonzalez
    Throughout, what truly matters to director Jonathan Glazer is articulating through visual and aural enticement the unconscious power of our death drive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    With The Devil's Backbone, Del Toro pulls an AmenĂ¡bar by dishing out sophisticated war commentary with bone-chilling dread.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ed Gonzalez
    In its stripped-down realism and blistering fixation on its main character's grappling with life and mortality, the film is kin to Roberto Rossellini's collaborations with Ingrid Bergman.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Possibly year's most immaculate-looking drivel, a prismatically shot whodunit abundant in red herrings, but lacking in moral contemplation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    While Jim Mickle's compositions lose much of their verve in the film's later half, his regard for the analog does not--and at the expense of perspective into his characters' emotional torque.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Carlos Reygadas's latest, an almost impossibly intellectual film, keeps us at a remove that's as striking as that which separates its main character from the lower classes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Though The Conjuring claims to be based on a true story, in truth it's based on every horror film that's come before it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Una Noche tugged at my heartstrings, but the film's almost phantasmagoric fixation on sex can feel crass and dehumanizing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The result is an alternately gripping and dully meandering patchwork of these soldiers' stay in the Korengal that pointedly shuns big-picture philosophizing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Forlorn depictions of love and death may dignify Neil Jordan's film, but narrative withholding ultimately drives a stake into its unmistakable heart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Opting for inspiration over insight, Venus and Serena is a starry-eyed pop documentary that cannot transcend its scattershot, for-fans-only filmmaking.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Guillermo del Toro doesn't rise above the obligations of staging a film of this sort as a multi-level video game, a stylish but programmatic ride toward an inevitable final boss battle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The film is beholden to a strange internal logic that gives primacy not to its protagonist's suffering, but to its maker's thirst for fun.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Bobcat Goldthwait exposes the characteristic male pursuit of power to which females are often made subservient.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Eugenio Mira thrills in watching his main character attempt to worm his way out of a most unusual hostage situation, synching his indulgences of style to the pianist's wily physical maneuvering.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Through a mini-triumph of montage, what begins as run-of-the-mill backstory vomit is thrillingly repackaged as an almost-Lynchian duet between warring states of consciousness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Ed Gonzalez
    Throughout To the Wonder, the new and old are incessantly twinned, blurred into a package that suggests an experimental dance piece.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    One can never fully shake the feeling that the sense of unease the filmmakers rouse, every act of seduction, infiltration, and vengeance they orchestrate, is borrowed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    Charlie Paul isn't content to let his stock footage and interviewees lead for him, driven as he is to "make something out of a frame of mind," though to needlessly busy effect.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Ed Gonzalez
    Paddy Considine's benumbed ambiguity at least works against writer-director Shan Khan's reduction of honor killings to grist for the cheapest of pulpy thrills.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The titular signal refers to the Nomad hacker's taunts, though it may as well point to the film's nature as a self-styled calling card.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Gonzalez
    The constant foregrounding of so much well-executed incident only works to shortchange the heroes' yearnings and anxieties.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Gonzalez
    Passion is a serpentine, gorgeously orchestrated gathering of all of De Palma's pet themes and conceits, a symphony of giddy terror where people perpetually hide behind masks, both literal and figurative.