Elizabeth Weitzman

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For 2,246 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Lowest review score: 0 Dumbbells
Score distribution:
2246 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is not, frankly, a movie you'll remember long after you see it. But it has just enough moments of genuine intimacy to indicate that Masterson ought to give directing another try.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A popcorn movie has one goal, and that's to entertain. Immortals meets this criteria handily, and serves as a splendid spectacle besides.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Just as you need two hands to clap, explain frustrated young activists, the ­Dalai Lama requires a reasonable partner with whom to negotiate. And right now, it seems, the Tibetans may as well have their arms tied behind their backs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    DuVernay's feature debut is simple and almost proudly plain. But such a stripped-down approach allows its authenticity to shine.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Marie Féret struggles to hold the film's center throughout, but there's more than enough to distract us, from transcendent music to sumptuous costumes and sets.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If "Saw V" offers an example of how little filmmakers can get away with, Splinter proves how much a director can do with next to nothing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s not easy to play twins (in another language, no less), without relying on showy mannerisms to define them. But Mortensen pulls it off. Your move, Franco.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Better to stick with his slightly weird, ultra-focused nerds, who toil away on something strange and special, simply for the beauty of it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The result would make an excellent inspirational video for aspiring players, but it's not quite ready for the pros.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's big, bright, savvy, and so expansive you'll undoubtedly leave feeling you got your money's worth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As for Ginsberg himself: Should we be more impressed that Radcliffe so confidently portrays an actual icon, or that he banishes all memories of the fictional one he’s portrayed before? Both accomplishments suggest that he’s got real talent, and a future that’s already taking him well past Harry Potter.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A rousing period drama with all the familiar trimmings: gorgeous costumes, palatial settings and romantic intrigue.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While "Twilight" will make more money and get more attention, the darkly comic Cirque du Freak boasts the shaggy charm of the natural underdog.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Enthusiasm carries the day in this paint-by-numbers period tale, which is just charming enough to coast on its own clichés.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There have been so many movies about aspiring superheroes in recent years, they practically constitute their own genre. Though hardly ground-breaking, this whimsical Australian entry is just endearing enough to stand out from the pack.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you're the type who unwinds by watching "The Wire" or "Law & Order: SVU," you might appreciate this grim procedural drama from French actress Maïwenn. There's no denying its power: It took home the Jury Prize at Cannes last year. But for most, Polisse will be tough going.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Some of the shocks are way too broad, and the enclosed perspective suggests the material would better suit a play. But Crawford radiates charisma, and Pierce sells even the nuttiest moments.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are a select few artists who can take the same materials used by everyone else and create a masterpiece. Coco Chanel was one of them. Director Anne Fontaine is not.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For his directorial debut, Bateman returns to his bad-boy beginnings. And the results are predictably amusing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The real reason to see the movie -- and it's reason enough -- is the trove of archival footage, which shows a star of almost impossible magnetism.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script does boast a fair share of zingers, delivered with arch wit by a crack team of professionals.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    To be sure, there are many reasons to see the film. The cinematography is memorably vibrant, and the performances are solid, even if they pass by too swiftly. Most of all, of course, the subject matter remains fascinating.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A heartfelt, bittersweet and often amusing portrait of early middle-age.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Best of all is the well-used West Village setting, which feels like the perfect backdrop for a slightly offbeat love story.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Miserable individuals do tend to make for interesting subject matter, and this would be far more of a dry biography without its willfully eccentric lead. Plus, if the crankiness gets to you, tune it out and focus on the music. That's what Clapton did.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The heart of the film is the touching relationship between two lonely souls. The lovely, feisty chemistry between Rowlands and Jackson will keep even the most cynical viewers on their toes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While a delicate topic would seem to require a delicate touch, Wexler goes more for cheeky entertainment. To some degree, it works.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Hokey reenactments of the war years do the film no favors, but it’s worth sticking them out to witness a humanity that never could be faked.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fans can be forgiven for offering this predictable indie some excess generosity, simply because writer-director Marshall Lewy had the good sense to build a movie around such a versatile lead.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    So what we're left with is a sort of contact high, drifting gently over to our seats in the back row.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There’s little doubt that the obvious parallels between this dark coming-of-age drama and “To Kill a Mockingbird” are deliberate. But while they are undeniably overreaching, director Rufus Norris has adapted Daniel Clay’s young adult novel with a sensitivity that will appeal to teens and adults alike.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Like 2003's "Lizzie McGuire" movie, "Hannah" breaks little new ground but makes the big screen shift with liveliness and sense of humor impressively intact.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Tusk is alternately amusing, appalling and frustrating. It’s also unique.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As full-length toy advertisements go, you really couldn’t ask for more.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie’s shallow amusements do make for an ideal guilty pleasure, especially since the actors seem to be having so much fun. Bates, marching around like an overstuffed pigeon, is a reliable scene-stealer, while the two leads make an entirely convincing couple.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The most interesting threads aren't political but personal, with a melodramatic romance providing some well-earned tears. Your final thoughts, however, are likely to concern Jennifer Tilly, who's so bizarrely miscast as a severe missionary that her presence becomes its own distraction.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Predictable as the adventure may be, the company — and the countryside — make it worthwhile.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Frontrunners is a lot rougher than Nanette Burstein's recent, similar documentary, "American Teen," and its comparable lack of gloss is both an asset and a flaw.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Its straightforward approach is notably lacking the divine inspiration of its subject. But Don McGlynn's gospel documentary delivers so many moments of artistic ecstasy, we can forgive the plain wrapping.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Anthologies are risky. For every high point, there's often a misstep to match. But this indie compilation has enough inventive chills to interest any horror fan.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This impassioned documentary is well-intentioned and admirable in its aims, but overreaching and therefore lacking impact.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a formula, all right, but a strong cast goes a long way toward carrying it off. We get one, for the most part, in Alfredo De Villa's cheerfully familiar dramedy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The scenery is stunning and the story compelling, but some viewers will find it easier to admire Tracks than to engage with this meditative tale of Robyn Davidson (played beautifully by Mia Wasikowska).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As is, the film is more likely to impress the choir than change many minds.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As its defiantly bland title suggests, Fighting is a bare-bones effort that tries just hard enough to keep us watching. By making good use of its New York setting, Montiel does bring a certain indie grit to the generic story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Melodrama, romance and action are cheerfully jumbled together, so as long as you're ready to embrace the excess of swoony sentimentality, you'll get more than your money's worth.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Perhaps every generation gets the movie stars it deserves. “Olympus” has quite a bit to say about the current state of our country. Intentions aside, not all of it is entirely flattering.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He definitely needs more experience, but writer/director Jake Goldberger displays an appealingly skewed sense of humor in his noir debut.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What’s crucially missing, however, is a hissable villain. Nor are there any memorable tunes, which is too bad given that Broadway star Menzel is playing Elsa.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If someone else had made "My Son," it would be just another crime thriller based on a true story. But with Werner Herzog behind the camera, it's a head-scratcher from start to finish.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Understatement is one of Mark Wahlberg’s greatest assets. But that admirable trait winds up working against him in The Gambler, Rupert Wyatt’s otherwise intriguing dramatic thriller.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite the overlong running time, the action moves smoothly and swiftly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's barely a frame that doesn't look stretched, smashed or otherwise harassed. Imagine "The Matrix" on speed, and you're halfway there.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Intermittent shots of actress Emmanuelle Seigner embodying the lyrics are surplus.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Perhaps it’s inevitable that the movie works best not while we’re watching fictional recreations, but when we see real footage or hear actual broadcasts.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the mumblecore esthetic is familiar and the movie's ultimate impact slight, the filmmakers do find a fresh and modestly amusing twist by tossing their hipster out of his natural habitat.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We never do find out what really went on behind the scenes of “Community.” But the delightful success of a charismatic loner like Crittenden could be considered one of Harmon’s greatest accomplishments.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Newcomers may be disappointed by such a slender effort, but fans of revered Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami will find plenty to appreciate in his observant followup to 2010’s acclaimed “Certified Copy.”
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For her part, Lotz carries the load with such briskly efficient confidence, it's no surprise to learn that she's already got several more movies on the way.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Not much happens in Sandra Nettelbeck’s intimate family drama, but its well-drawn connections between lonely souls make an impact nonetheless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite its definitive title, you won't actually learn much about Alfred Hitchcock from Sacha Gervasi's briskly superficial biopic. But you'll enjoy the experience anyway.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The performances are absurdly broad, and each story line is more outlandish than the last. But De Felitta’s approach is so easygoing, and the waterside setting so irresistibly charming, you’re bound to walk out in a great mood. How many movies can do that for you?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's Theron who owns this film, imbuing her deliciously depraved Queen with furious pain and deep-seated fear.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Pray unfolds the family's story with patience and skill, making it both a compliment and a complaint to say that he leaves us wanting to know much more.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The title's accurate; there are lots of minor but magical moments, like witnessing the accidental invention of tie-dye.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you embrace the overkill, you’ll enjoy it. But if extravagance isn’t your thing, move swiftly on to something lighter and more digestible.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though it remains a little too enigmatic, Marek Najbrt's Holocaust drama is atmospheric enough to keep us edgy on its heroine's behalf.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You'll need a taste for nostalgia to really appreciate Fright Night, which knowingly blends Eighties cheese with Nineties snark - a combination that works better than it sounds.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    How you respond to Pitch Perfect will depend primarily on how you feel about its obvious inspirations: "Glee," "Bring It On" and the food-poisoning scene from "Bridesmaids."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most impressive: the striking vibrancy of the animation. This is the rare movie that earns the extra cost of 3-D glasses.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's still a lot to like here, but ultimately the movie reflects its hapless hero a little too well. While we're constantly rooting for it to succeed, the finish line seems forever out of reach.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Vanessa Lapa constructed this straightforward biopic about SS leader Heinrich Himmler from a recently found trove of his personal letters and photographs. Her streamlined approach seems appropriate for the subject, which boils down to the banality of evil.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Kids, of course, are unlikely to get the religious allusions. All they'll see is a decent family adventure, perfectly suited to a cold Saturday morning -- and likely to be forgotten by Sunday.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Like his 2007 political drama, "Lions for Lambs," Robert Redford's fictionalized chronicle of Mary Surratt's 1865 trial is high-minded and slow-moving. Some may chafe at his unsubtle sermonizing, but strong central performances will reward the patient.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As with so many message movies, this one trades ­nuance for naked outrage. The filmmakers'heartfelt intent is admirable, but right now they’re competing with a more compellingly told reality.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The mystery is pretty low-key and the resolution somewhat disappointing. But Amalric is mesmerizing and the film’s taut, chilly tone leaves us unnerved.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the Tickells' unabashedly partial, first-person approach is a liability, they present so much damning evidence that their case is - one hopes - impossible to ignore.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The entire cast is solid, but most notable are Greer and Silverman, who make the most of unexpectedly serious roles.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Guaranteed to charm anyone who’s out of school and already bored.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The primary response he's (Kitano) seeking seems best expressed by one typically ill-fated player: "What the hell … ?"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Hoffman has a nice eye for detail, painting an empathetic portrait of lost souls that recalls 1955's still-powerful romance "Marty."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both in name and spirit, The A-Team drags the Eighties into the 21st century, and you might be surprised to find -- if only briefly -- that you've missed them just a little.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Bruce Hendricks makes little use of the 3D technology, though the gimmick does distract from the fact that we learn nothing new about the guys. It would have been interesting to hear something of their history, especially given their much-discussed Evangelical background.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Weitz takes a looser approach than the series’ last director, Catherine Hardwicke, did. He has a better sense of humor, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In Hollywood, all is forgiven if you can deliver the goods. On-screen, at least, there’s little difference between this Gibson and the one we remember from earlier films like “Ransom” and “Payback.”
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Anyone with a fondness for the midcentury cartoons and films that inspired this scrappy comedy will appreciate the latest trip to the titular British boarding school.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Whether you call Anton Corbijn’s adaptation of John le Carré’s 2008 novel “deliberately paced” or “so slow I can feel my hair growing,” there’s no denying the power behind the central performance.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Wahlberg is surprisingly committed to the ridiculousness.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While softening Geisel's darker themes, they still meld a valuable message into catchy songs, bright images (nicely done in 3D) and funny characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The trailer for Like Crazy is one of the best of the year, and I couldn't wait to see the movie that inspired it. Turns out, the film itself plays like one long trailer, a collection of moments and montages that hint at, but never quite achieve, a fully realized whole.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A good-natured and highly enjoyable goof.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's an unexpected appeal to John Gray's modest drama, emanating from its center.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The parts are greater than the whole, but there’s a lot to like here, including the easy interplay between the leads.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite some early whispers of awards potential, The Debt is nothing more than a gritty thriller with a highbrow pedigree.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Boy
    Waititi retains his quirky style, but it feels meaningful here, a valid effort to explore the difficulties in coming of age during tough times.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Many witnesses offer emotional recollections of the ensuing riots, but equally powerful moments come courtesy of old footage, in which anti-gay "experts" expound with a confident ignorance that sounds chillingly familiar even today.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie can’t help feeling like a vanity affair — a shot of novocaine, instead of a letter bomb.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Since Alfred Hitchcock set the standard for strangers-on-a-train thrillers, Anderson has a lot to live up to. He falls short of creating a new classic, but he does manage to keep us on edge for most of the movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Who knew? Turns out, Jean-Claude Van Damme is a funny guy, and a pretty good actor, too. Fans may already be aware of this, but JCVD is likely to introduce a whole new Van Damme to everybody else.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    9
    Shane Acker's underwritten but beautifully animated debut is both an ode to technology and a warning against it. Perhaps unintentionally, the film itself echoes those themes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Directors Maiken Baird and Michelle Major may have begun this documentary with the intention of profiling two of the most successful siblings in sports. But any reality TV viewer knows that bad behavior is always more compelling than likability. So this movie’s title becomes, perhaps to the filmmakers’ own surprise, a little misleading.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Cruise's tightly controlled performance holds our attention all the way through to the tense finale. Still, McQuarrie's script never gets at the heart of a character who's already inspired such a passionate fan base.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A fun project that doesn't quite reach its potential, Josh Koury's doc is still worthwhile for anyone who can't wait until 2009 to see Harry Potter back on the big screen.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The parts are ultimately greater than the whole, but Adam Reid's offbeat debut suggests a talent worth watching.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Because (Vilanch) is such a character, the movie ends up being a lot of fun.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This version is never rough, nor rude, nor boisterous, but for first-timers, perhaps wisely and slow is the way to go. There will be time enough for them to discover cinema’s superior adaptations anon.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There is something infectious about the old-fashioned innocence of Mark Waters' comedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    "I hate this stinkin' war," Neil Young announces in this chronicle of CSNY's "Freedom of Speech Tour," and the rest of the movie is just as unapologetically blunt.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though it can't quite transcend its filmmaker's earnest intentions, this solemn history lesson offers several powerful moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For any adult feeling overwhelmed by bad news and dark times, your antidote is right here.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie ends with a setup for another sequel, which will undoubtedly be embraced by fans. Let’s just hope we don’t have to wait another 14 years to see it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Creating a hypnotically digressive travelogue, Herzog wanders from soul to soul, asking deceptively mild questions to potent effect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While the Tony-winning play based on the same book creates unexpected impact through strikingly inventive puppetry, Spielberg is at a disadvantage in employing such a literal approach. Not even animals as beautiful as these can substitute for human ingenuity and imagination.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are no villains here, no attempts to sway opinions or even stake out political ground. Some will find that a disappointment. But the truth is that this effort is both more evenhanded than most dramas with similar themes, and more open-hearted.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Cute, mostly well-mannered and just a bit off-center.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Rock of Ages is an experience that will alternately leave you embarrassed and amused.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The participants make a strong case, although the most emotionally powerful moments involve the workers themselves.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ted
    True chemistry is hard to find. And by some stroke of movie magic - or sheer skill - Wahlberg and the bear make a pretty great team.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    These are the best moments, when Stewart and a wisely understated Gugino are free to enact their own wistful, beautifully intuitive pas de deux.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s still compelling entertainment, as any biopic about Paul Raymond ought to be. Though nearly unknown in the U.S., Raymond was a famous figure in his native Britain, a flashy combination of Donald Trump and Hugh Hefner.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Salles has made an admirable effort, which - while no roman candle - can be appreciated for its honest ambitions.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film is best suited for dance buffs excited by an unexpected congregation of artistic pioneers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script is compelling, the direction confident, the production values professional. But it does not, in the end, feel real.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While the filmmakers never quite make the case that their chosen melody deserves its own full-length film, they do ensure that you’ll leave the theater happily humming it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Not all of the movie works - in fact, huge portions don't - but there are enough striking moments to make a lasting impact. How ironic: In this fairy-tale of arrested development, Korine has created his most mature movie yet.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie’s strong sense of empathy, enhanced by several noteworthy performances, ought to engage most viewers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Directed tastefully by Ralph Fiennes, The Invisible Woman is very lovely to look at. But it lives up to its own title too well.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Helstein doesn't have to work so hard to remind us of her subject's gravity; the stories chronicled are chilling enough without embellishment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    No one looks at the world quite like Kaurismäki, and his deadpan sentimentality is worth discovery. This is a good place to start.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Stonehearst Asylum, Brad Anderson’s adaptation of an Edgar Allan Poe story, is undeniably preposterous. But if you accept the grandly Gothic insanity here, there’s a lot of fun to be had.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie works best as a calling card for young Haney-Jardine, whom we can surely expect to see more of on the festival circuit.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The entire cast, in fact, seems to be having fun, with Affleck and Koechner cheerfully stealing each one of their scenes. And the jokes come often enough to leave us consistently amused and occasionally delighted.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Kat Coiro - who co-wrote with Ritter - spices up the formula just enough to keep us watching, while Bosworth adds versatile edge to the BFF banter.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Some of this wallowing goes on too long, risking our alienation from characters who are difficult to like. What saves the film is the fact that they are always easy to recognize, both as self-centered teenagers and tentatively maturing young adults.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A sassy script and good-natured voice work from Benedict Cumberbatch and John Malkovich should keep kids and grownups entertained over the holidays.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing exceptional about Jane Campion's historical biography, but it's a sufficiently lovely tale to suit romantics with a taste for intimate period dramas.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Hampered by both an unimaginative script and ordinary direction, but it’s a serious Oscar contender. Why? Because Julianne Moore is in the lead.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film is spectacularly constructed, from intimate closeups to dizzying chase scenes. But as is often the case with this format, the motion-capture animation feels weirdly lifeless.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Rafferty keeps the structure so blandly standard, the title is nearly the most intriguing element of the whole film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Surprisingly conventional by director Richard Linklater's standards, this pleasant, low-key dramedy is most memorable for the discovery of co-star Christian McKay.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Grubin is an experienced documentarian, and he plays to his strengths here. He certainly makes the most of the Manhattan setting, whether his characters are practicing at Juilliard or playing for cash in the Times Square subway station.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Woven amid the glib one-liners and contrived scenarios is an unexpected, and undeniably touching, sense of heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The real romance here is between the filmmakers and the cultural moment they hope to document. From that perspective, it's a welcome - if not quite award-worthy - valentine.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are enough droll moments to spark cult status, and McBride's commitment is impressive.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If "Up" is the animated equivalent of an ice cream sundae, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs is the Popsicle: Neither as rich nor as memorable, but more than welcome on a long, hot summer day.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ultimately, though, director Morten Tyldum’s conventional approach doesn’t do full justice to his tragically unconventional hero.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Overlong and dramatically thin.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    "Night" never quite coalesces into the forceful drama it hopes to be.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It doesn't dip much below the surface, but Tamra Davis' biography of her friend Jean-Michel Basquiat, who died in 1988, offers an informative introduction to one of contemporary art's most complex figures.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Cera is adorable, Yi’s faux ­naiveté is overplayed and her philosophical musings are underwhelming. But you won’t soon forget the real-life couples she interviews.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    García Bernal's irrepressible charm provides a burst of welcome energy with each brief appearance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The screenplay, adapted from Glendon Swarthout’s 1988 novel, lacks its heroine’s rigid spine. The story buckles in the latter half. As a result, we wind up watching two very different movies. The first forges ahead with Cuddy’s fiery righteousness. The second takes a much safer route, in which her pioneering spirit is sorely missed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are no surprises among the characters — depressed mom (Amy Jo Johnson), controlling aunt (Cynthia Stevenson), new boyfriend (Tatanka Means) — but the cast is strong enough to build on familiar elements.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While plenty of talking heads turn up to offer breathless praise, it's no surprise that the preeminent words of wisdom are, thanks to copious archival footage, Vreeland's own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite the packed plot adapted by Polanski and Robert Harris from Harris' novel -- the pacing feels oddly slack.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script unfurls too many obvious setups, but director Eric Valette is smart enough to rely on his most authentic effect — Dupontel’s natural intensity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The wisecracking Chan and the stoic Li play off their on-screen images with good humor, and if they don't have the agility they once did, it's still a joy to watch them make the most of Yuen Woo-ping's impressive choreography.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The cast, including Orlando Bloom and Evangeline Lilly as warrior elves, is also excellent (though we don’t get even a glimpse of Andy Serkis’ Gollum). And individually, each escapade does hold its own thrills.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Mohan should have made a little more effort for us. Another pass at the screenplay probably would have done it. But one gets the sense he's already moved on to the next thing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though "Woman" never rises above its status as a traditional genre thriller, that's perfectly fine. It was made with intelligence and commitment, and it achieves its goal: to keep us looking over our shoulders long after we've left.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Provides just enough smart, silly fun for families desperately seeking an easy (and air-conditioned) escape from hazy August humidity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The notable lack of chemistry between Cruz and Homar is a crucial absence in a film about all-consuming romance. And though each part is great fun to watch, the whole feels unfinished.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Weisz's meticulously crafted turn is certainly touching, but it lacks the immediacy of, say, Celia Johnson's in 1945's "Brief Encounter."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie's intensity is given crucial depth via Moura's somber and unshowy performance.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He's (Clooney) got the makings of a great movie here: one that represents our politically surreal times with keen insight and appropriate cynicism. It's only when he veers off the path, suddenly worried he'll lose our attention, that he falters.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Lisa Albright has less success balancing the tones of two eras: the movie is more successful when replicating matter-of-fact '70s grit than the independent miserabilism of the '90s.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The story is never less than gripping, but the most important questions disappear into that unbearably bleak abyss.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Such a unique personality really deserves a more interesting tribute, but it's so nice to see this one-of-a-kind nonagenarian still going strong.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The cumulative power of so many great minds envisioning our potential self-destruction is undeniable. You may start planning your move off the grid before the movie even ends.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The subject matter calls for ruthless observation, but his candy-colored pop vision has more in common with “Glee” than, say, “Heathers.” He’s aiming for a stinging WTF, but winds up with a fairly mild LOL.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Few of the parts harmonize ­properly, leaving us with provocative fragments rather than an electrifying whole.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s Ross, however, who really makes a lasting impact. Someone should snap her up for a series — and soon.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's disappointing when a big-screen romance can't match up to the one in your imagination, at any age.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Peake provides the solid center for a movie that would otherwise melt into indie formula. The quirky supporting characters, slow pacing and predictable plotting intermittently threaten to overwhelm such a modest story. But then Ted secretly turns his camera back toward Vanetia and, like him, we’re smitten again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Soderbergh does his best with limited time, but his biggest success may be in pushing viewers home, to watch Gray's films in full.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is, in its way, a horror movie -- not least because it will burrow into your own brain, as a reminder of all the ways the modern world is making you crazy, too.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In this visually and emotionally severe landscape, Reichardt has created the sort of film that will inspire grad students to write passionate thesis papers - and casual moviegoers to feel as lost as her would-be settlers.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Redbelt will fascinate those who share David Mamet's interest in mixed martial arts. But its hold may be weaker on those who don't.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Lerman is suited to the title role in that he plays Charlie as wide-eyed and rather unmemorable. Watson doesn't seem entirely relaxed as an American teen, though she does serve as a lovely first crush. Among the adults making brief but notable appearances is Paul Rudd, as a sympathetic English teacher.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The unavoidable obstacle is that the perpetually elegant Knightley does not belong. Not at a prom, not furtively partying in a parent’s basement and not, alas, in this movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You don't even have to be familiar with the first book in Rick Riordan's popular fantasy series to enjoy Chris Columbus' energetic adaptation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The flaws are more than balanced out by the risks the earnest Kelly encourages his excellent cast to take.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Somehow, though, director Huck Botko and writer Jeff Tetreault have turned their dopey tribute to testosterone into a surprisingly amusing rom-com.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In a small theater, it’s easy to feel like you’re a part of the romance unfolding before you. But in the grander scheme of an impersonal cineplex, it’s an uphill climb.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There is plenty of evidence that Webber has something significant to say, and the gifts with which to express himself. Once he’s ready to commit fully to his own vision, there’s no end to what he might accomplish.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Narrator Morgan Freeman manages to be both soothing and somber, so it's not until the credits roll that we realize how much more we want to know.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie is not up to the company’s highest standards, but it’s certainly better than most other kid flicks you’ll see this year.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There’s a lot of heart in his creativity. But this particular effort, delightful as it often is, lacks some essential soul.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The only thing that's missing, in fact, is a soul. On the other hand, there's a good chance you'll get so caught up in what they're doing, you won't even notice how stiff and inhuman the actors appear.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Danhier backs all the memories with a collection of great clips, and it's extra fun to spot familiar faces (hi, Steve Buscemi!).
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Provocatively intentioned, The Reader is a movie worth seeing - the kind of film you'll think about for days afterward. But when all is said and done, you're likely to wonder why the impact wasn't greater still.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Far surpasses original.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This full, sweet comedy, adapted by star Aasif Mandvi from an Off-Broadway play, has a city flavor and a wry take on familial obligations.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Salim Akil has found actors skillful enough to enhance Elizabeth Hunter and Arlene Gibbs' conventional screenplay.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The plotlines are clichéd and the score overbearing, but uniformly strong turns go a long way towards shaping the lush, nostalgic atmosphere. Don't forget to bring tissues.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing about Josh Crook's cop saga that will strike you as new, but he and his talented lead do build an epic feel into this gritty tale of corruption.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The kids here do come across as genuine people, struggling with issues everyone can understand.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Niels Arden Oplev keeps the action relatively tight. But he revels in the story’s sadism to an uncomfortable degree, especially in a needlessly vile rape scene. Two more sequels are coming. Here’s hoping there’s just a little less hate in each.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Passionate and ambitious, John Walter's chronicle of a Public Theater production is too scattered for broad appeal. But those who connect with his themes will find themselves quickly drawn in.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie plays things relatively straight, acknowledging clichés without the winking irony in which modern homages usually indulge. As such, it's giddy fun - a well-made genre picture that sends up its influences even as it clearly reveres them.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The one person who does appreciate Emilia is Portman - which is what saves The Other Woman from the easy judgment toward which it so often appears to be edging.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Schwartzman and Pryce are compelling in their self-regard. But it’s no coincidence that the lovely, empathetic Moss is who we root for.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While "FWK" never challenges us, it does remain consistently engaging.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    OK, haters: Here’s the movie meant to silence your complaints about Kristen Stewart’s acting range. And it might, if you can sit through all of it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most of the performances are as unpolished as they are heartfelt, which is both endearing and distracting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Feels more respectful than real.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The actors - including Aidan Quinn as Lena's lover - work hard to balance a mood that fluctuates between stillness and stagnancy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The biggest flaw is the casting: only Shannyn Sossamon delivers a performance of even modest depth.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's as if the TV character Dawson directed "Heathers," or another one, Parker Lewis, remade "Scream." Who'd have guessed that would be a can't-lose idea?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Byrkit and his actors successfully build a sense of tension, and then dread, from what appears to be an extremely limited budget. Indeed, the movie was shot primarily in his own living room.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Every generation deserves its ultimate high school romance, and Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist clearly aims to take the slot currently open. Despite a valiant attempt, though, it doesn't quite make the grade.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Don't let the generic title fool you: David John Swajeski's documentary tells a story you're unlikely to forget.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Incredibly enough, it seems many people still believe that bullying is just a matter of "kids being kids." Until that attitude changes, this film should be considered required viewing for every parent, teacher and teenager in America.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Instead of falling into exaggerated exploitation, Coppola always stays true to the essence of adolescence — that sense of waiting, reacting and then waiting some more.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Loyal fans of the Sondheim original may feel a bit let down themselves. There’s much to love here. But working with original “Woods” writer and Sondheim collaborator James Lapine, Marshall tones down the crucial dark shading in some places and has trouble with pacing in others.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Intermittently compelling biography.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bieber's world - at least as edited for mass consumption - is a refreshingly wholesome universe, where a young superstar is good-natured and grateful, says grace before every meal, and spends all his free time on the tour bus tweeting. He also likes to hug, a lot.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Even if we can't live his cowboy life, Buck Brannaman's world is well worth visiting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Breillat, seemingly inspired as much by C.S. Lewis and Hans Christian Andersen as by original author Charles Perrault, doesn't really make the most of her subversive premise.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fortunately, the cast — featuring Allison Janney as Bianca’s scattered mom and Ken Jeong as her sympathetic mentor — is savvy and silly. Really, though, most of the credit goes to Whitman, who stands in, and stands up, for the DUFF in all of us.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The chemistry between the leads is more cozy than sexy, but the biggest issue is Latifah's noticeable - and admirable - discomfort with the rom-com clichés found throughout Michael Elliot's screenplay.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A darkly comic underachiever that manages to charm almost in spite of itself, Ruben Fleischer's 30 Minutes or Less is probably best watched as it was made: without much evident effort. In other words, wait until it hits DVD, order a pizza and Netflix it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Coogan and Brydon make terrific companions for us partially because, at least as they appear onscreen, they’re so amusingly incompatible themselves.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most important, he’s got Vaughn, whose mix of silliness and sincerity is an ideal anchor for the broad premise. Vaughn is one of those actors who tends to autopilot his way through too many mediocre projects. When he goes all in, though, it’s impossible to resist his charm.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Knightley and Canet make a far more compelling pair. As they wander through the city after hours, doing nothing more than talking, they generate the kind of romantic heat that's all too rare onscreen.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Bowser uses old footage when possible, the absence of his subject -- who died tragically in 1976 -- is keenly felt.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    So maybe this movie should serve as his introduction to a larger series, in which each artist gets the individual portrait Neville so clearly wants them all to have.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Oddly, there isn't as much originality as you'd expect from a global search for meaning.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though we see the same man throughout the bumpy tour captured here -- always calm, steady, faithful -- it's bound to prove an enlightening portrait for those who know him only as the guy who once worked with Peter Gabriel.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As fans of "Freaks and Geeks" know, Segel is a master in the art of humiliation, and it's been a long time since we've seen anyone debase himself so thoroughly for our amusement.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We never learn why most of his subjects remain loyal to a faith that so explicitly rejects them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script is merely serviceable and too reminiscent of similar fantasy tales. But kids will instantly relate to the gentle Soren, while watching wide-eyed as he faces each challenge.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The beginning is awkwardly earnest, but the play matures considerably while retaining its youthful energy and enthusiasm
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite their efforts to address most sides of this complex story, each new interview leaves us wanting to know even more. Of course, that's the sign of a compelling film - but in this case, not an altogether satisfying one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    By the end, Holdridge has captured the bittersweet complexities of romance with a wisdom that proves surprisingly seductive.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Feels more earnest than real. Still, its sincerity is admirable, and often touching.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The most adorably filthy movie you may ever see.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The magic simply isn't there.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A far cry from 2010's shallow rom-com of the same name, this Leap Year is a haunting portrait of loneliness in its starkest state.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As the most comfortable performer among this inexperienced cast, Walken brings a crucial maturity. In contrast, Young seems to have been hired primarily for his uncanny falsetto.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He may be a first-time feature ­director, but music video master Benny Boom clearly knows how to pull a midlevel movie ­together.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The real stars of this film are the same ones who stole every show -- women who once boasted names like Tempest Storm, Candy Cotton and Lady Midnight. Their stories are alternately tragic and inspiring, and often very funny.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If this sounds like a typical date movie, worry not. It's very much an Apatow production-though the crasser additions, like his already-notorious food poisoning scene, feel painfully forced.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Zoe Saldana makes being an action hero look so easy in Colombiana, you have to wonder why more actresses don't try it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Just like the movies it parodies, this one feels over long before it's actually done.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Kline has a ball, while Dano turns in a pitch-perfect performance. He never mocks his character's desires, or undersells his fears.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s cheesy fun for sure, but fun nonetheless.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Charlie Minn seems intent on educating the world about the crisis of violence occurring in Mexico. While his new film feels too much like a retread of "8 Murders a Day," which he released last year, it's still urgent enough to warrant a view.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Jennifer Kroot’s good-natured biography is so appealing that even non-Trekkies may be convinced we needed a full-length documentary about the man who was Sulu.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's hard to ignore the fact that very little in the movie feels true - no one clicks as a couple, and there are carefully contrived coincidences around every corner.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The performances save the movie from a treacly inevitability.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Argento and Aattou lack the searing chemistry needed, the social politics are consistently intriguing, and everything - not to mention everyone -looks absolutely stunning.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you wait for the grift, you’ll only be disappointed. There are no jolting twists or shocking reveals. The reward lies mostly in accepting each character on his or her terms.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's no denying that paparazzo Ron Galella is a New York character. What's at issue in Leon Gast's entertaining documentary is whether he's an artist or a creep.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's Franco's straight-faced turn that grounds this proudly lowbrow caper from his "Pineapple Express" collaborators, David Gordon Green and Danny McBride.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing in director Ryan Piers Williams' script that elevates this film above others with similar themes. But his heartfelt approach can be seen in the committed cast -- led by O'Nan but also including ­Valderrama, whose quietly ­authentic work is a nice surprise.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We could have lived without another ’90s-influenced exercise in gritty wonderment. But thanks to a perfectly-matched lead, Shia LaBeouf, the movie makes enough impact to justify its existence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    All those who have to drag themselves to work every morning will surely find some comfort in Seth Gordon's cheerfully outrageous revenge comedy, Horrible Bosses.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    How much control are you willing to cede when you see a movie? Because director Radu Mihaileanu is fiercely determined to manipulate your every emotion.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A Dangerous Method concerns itself primarily with sex, but what's most shocking is how conservative it turns out to be.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    "This is a woman's trip," it is announced in Tyler Perry's For Colored Girls, and how you respond to those words will likely determine how you respond to the film itself.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Hartley fans will certainly see his influence, especially in dialogue and movement that are so precise as to feel choreographed.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Mann and Perry are game, it's Efron who carries the movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you can look past the annoying quirks, you'll probably have a good time. As Steve says, sometimes, it pays to compromise.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sokolinski, a French pop singer better known at home as Soko, is fully in tune with Winocour’s sharp vision. Her intense, almost accusatory turn feels like the opposing image of Keira Knightley’s intellectual neurosis in 2011’s similarly themed “A Dangerous Method.” Where that film found some lightness within the dark, this one drags an historic darkness into the light.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There’s a potentially fascinating series waiting to be mined here, even if it is buried beneath bland visuals and a pedestrian script on the big-screen.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Nair leaves us guessing as to Changez’s motivations, she also uses a pretty heavy hand in laying out the movie’s themes. The changes between the novel and the screenplay are equally unsubtle, especially in regards to the ill-conceived romance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While their story is feather-light, Khoury and his actors have each type down perfectly. Worth seeing with friends, but you won't want to make a date night out of it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though based in truth, Mark Jacobson's script is built on age-old clichés. And nobody knows how to end the film, so it just fizzles out.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    To outsiders, in fact, Breaking Dawn: Part I will probably look like the weirdest, most expensive chastity commercial ever created. But Meyer's massive fan base will see something else entirely. They'll see a faithful, well-made depiction of the most eventful book in a beloved series. They'll see the actors they adore embodying characters they cherish.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Queen and Country features characters from the earlier movie. And it’s good. But “Hope and Glory” it is not.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You won't find a tale more true to our city than the extraordinary history of Pale Male. It's just unfortunate that Frederic Lilien's documentary is as clunky as his subject is graceful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Birbiglia is a great storyteller, but not a natural actor. Matt should really be played by someone with more skill - and by someone in his 20s, rather than a 33-year-old who pretends to be in his 20s by acting as clueless as possible.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This mundane romantic comedy is notable for one reason only: its leading couple.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you flinch at "boo," you'll find plenty to jump at here. Just don't expect striking originality, or even genuinely memorable eeriness. Still, every time "Dark" starts to feel like a generic thriller, it's saved by the distinctive stamp of co-screenwriter/producer Guillermo del Toro.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's not much to the movie, in which we watch the participants crack jokes and complain about their in-laws over corned beef. But when the diners include Sid Caesar, Carl Reiner, director Arthur Hiller ("Love Story"), "Animal House" producer Matty Simmons, and anachronistic announcer Gary Owens, it's worth pulling up a chair.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Often insightful and more than a little depressing, this is a story that only gets uglier as it goes on.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Sigman conveys a credible state of tense disbelief throughout, it's increasingly frustrating to watch Laura so passively accept her dire fate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Some of the accusations feel more sordid than satisfying.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Alvarez keeps us watching, he takes no real chances. Buried under all those enthusiastically mangled bodies is the comfort of familiarity. He may have intended to remake a single film, but we’ve seen this movie countless times before.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Coco’s angry frustration, Pug’s bruised confusion, and the police helicopters constantly hovering above the defiant bikers say enough.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The real star, though, is the ocean itself, which is so stunning in its furious majesty that we fully understand every risk they’re willing to take. Finally, a 3-D ticket worth paying for.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Younger kids looking for the cute connection between hesitant teen Hiccup and his loyal dragon, Toothless, may be stunned by the film’s violent tone. At the same time, it’s the unflinching edge that gives the film its unexpected depth.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Barratier directs with a jaunty artifice more typically seen on stage, but with the exception of Arnezeder, his cast turns theatricality to its advantage. They're offering us a sunny fantasy during a cloudy time, and seem well aware that we're unlikely to resist.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s worth seeing Robert May’s vital judicial expose — not only to learn about the titular scandal, but also to appreciate both the highs and lows of human resilience.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What we really want is to get to know them. Instead, the film too-aptly reflects life in their line of work: brief interludes rather than intimate soul-baring. That's a shame, since there can't be that many 70-year-old identical twin prostitutes with a 50-year history in the business.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    At first, Elie Wajeman’s moody French drama looks like so many other stories to come before it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Ryan Murphy achieved a major casting coup in landing Julia Roberts to play Gilbert - or Liz, as she's called here. As it turns out, though, a lesser star may have been a better choice.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A limited amount of original footage -- awkwardly enhanced with reenactments -- gives the film a somewhat narrow focus. But in a way, the dry tone fits.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    First-time feature director Omid Nooshin deftly downplays his budgetary limitations. He creates a sense of tension on the confining set and draws as much as possible out of a strong cast, led by Scott.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    At heart, Middle of Nowhere offers material we've seen many times before. But between her perceptive direction and Corinealdi's layered performance, this modest, micro-budgeted story has been beautifully packaged.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director James Gray is best known for hard-edged dramas like "Little Odessa," so it's surprising to find he has such a well-developed romantic side. This isn't your average date-night flick, though.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In his directorial debut, Krasinski doesn't seem to believe in his hideous men so much as he appears intimidated by them.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A more probing exploration of the subjects' diverse challenges would have been welcome. But your heart connects to these young artists. When they soar - onstage and off - you feel it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The baby angle is really just a hook on which to hang wry commentary about single life in the city, but Lisecki approaches his subject with obvious affection, and the game cast makes most of the sitcom-silly antics work.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The lack of subtlety indicates that this is a first film, but the passion and insights are strong enough to make you wonder what he'll (Webber) do next.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Such dark doings won't be for everyone, but fans of similarly dry Nordic fare -- like the works of Aki Kaurismaki -- will be happy to have found it.

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