Elizabeth Weitzman
Select another critic »
For 2,245 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Affliction
Lowest review score: 0 Oz the Great and Powerful
Score distribution:
2,245 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The result, while slight, is a poignant portrait of one of New York's all-star outlaws.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's left to the ideally cast McDormand to keep everything on track and, as expected, she weathers every tonal change with competence, confidence and a perfectly stiff upper lip.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A deeply felt, if occasionally amateurish, journey through some very affecting terrain.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Every time things start to get dull, you're brought up short by another moment of surprising beauty.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Modest but memorable.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If even one audience member leaves more concerned with the evils of poachers than the pleasures of Pokemon, Disney's more than done its job.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite some contrived plotting, Amari and Abbass have so much empathy for Lilia's shy self-discovery, it's a pleasure to watch her gradually give in to her newfound joy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both neurotic and endearing, it's so carefully accessorized you may not even notice that, at heart, it's a standard-issue romantic comedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bednarczyk's natural instincts put most programmed Hollywood moppets to shame, and the quietly affecting O'Keefe shows genuine talent.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A wild dream that spins into a nightmare, Moonlight isn't quite as provocative as it aims to be. But it will stick in your mind, and may even disturb your sleep.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A fairly average movie about a very unusual child, Vitus does have an earnest charm.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The opera's story -- about a Chinese princess who rejects all her suitors -- is never even fully explained.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Intermittently compelling drama.
    • New York Daily News
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie is so glacially paced and underdeveloped that it often feels as numb as its grieving hero.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you're wondering whether the rules of love change during war, you won't find a better case than the urgent, darkly comic relationship between these two.
    • New York Daily News
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's not giving too much away to note that we've seen a lot of this before, in classic noir and postnoir films, though to name those films would spoil things.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Gilbert blatantly takes Chong's side, so your level of empathy will rise or fall depending on how strongly you connect with his subject's hazy, if enthusiastic, dedication to "the pursuit of righteous happiness."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    By the time they're ready to leave their trench, we're not at all ready to see them go.
    • New York Daily News
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Some of the contemporary winks are questionable, but others are undeniably sharp.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sticking closely to formula, Disney delivers a sweet script and charming storybook backgrounds, with serviceable, if sappy, songs from Carly Simon.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Babenco does a better job with place than with people: His explosively overcrowded jail is a teeming tenement, which makes the inevitable climax feel, finally, like something real.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Intermittently amusing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sweet it is. Remotely connected to real life, however, it is not.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Proudly, and often hilariously, juvenile, "Destiny" is packed with typically grandiose Tenacious D anthems - the sort that thrill 15-year-old boys listening alone in their bedrooms.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Amu
    As writer, director and producer, Bose has taken on more than she can handle - a fact increasingly obvious each time she stumbles over political themes. But she has a genuine gift for atmosphere, making the many wordless scenes, in teeming streets and on crowded trains, the movie's best.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Mostly, Benazzo and Day leave us alone to take in the extraordinary sights and sounds.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although all the key players are back - including, fans will be glad to hear, Heather Matarazzo as cynical sidekick Lilly Moscovitz - the freshness of the first is long gone.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    At its best, TMNT does recall the slangy fun of the series' glory days. But there are too many moments when it feels as stale as one of Mikey's half-eaten pizzas.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As usual, Thomson steers right into the heart of vulnerability, with a painfully true performance as a guarded, confused soul.
    • New York Daily News
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For the most part, the Plastics' music -- is not extraordinary. But as it's told here, their story is.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Miller and Pearce are admirably determined to do their complex characters justice, but the generic script turns them into enigmatic symbols, locked in a hollow time capsule.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We can't quite shake the feeling we've seen this all done before, and better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Actors do an excellent job portraying young people struggling with an almost manic paranoia.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fortunately, Tushinski strikes the right balance throughout, interspersing old erotic photos and stills from Berlin's adult films with entertaining, current-day sound bites.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As complex as its subject's life and - like her - both flawed and fascinating.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Once again, we chart the growth of a woman and a country at the same time, a tough assignment that Harper tackles with humor and passion (even if her Kissinger impersonation could use a little work).
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An endearing premise and fanciful spirit aren't quite enough to rescue a film that has more heart than smarts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Jon Favreau's adaptation of Chris Van Allsburg's kid-lit adventure of the same name, more than fills the bill - though it's unlikely to draw anyone over the age of 11 (not counting baby-sitters).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    At its best when its heroes race furiously toward their missions, most of which involve jumping out of a helicopter into surging waves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Barney's cinematic art inspires both awe and revulsion, often simultaneously.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He may earn his living as a cab driver, but the blank hero of Martín Rejtman's sardonic Argentinean comedy is perfectly content to hitch his way through life.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    So well intentioned that its flaws may be generously overlooked by parents desperately planning activities for school breaks.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Weddell's accomplishments are inspiring, we would have been better served by a more impartial portrait. With its reverent tone, the movie often feels more like it was made by a doting granddaughter than a pro filmmaker.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An excellent idea that never quite pans out.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The beautiful black-and-white photography - and disappointingly sappy ending - are the only remotely sober elements here, thanks to Besson's loopy script and Debbouze's very funny turn as a loser who simply can't believe his luck.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though buoyed by excellent, unflinching performances, this melancholy drama reflects the dismally monotonous lives of its subjects just a little too well.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A cheerleader spoof that starts rousingly, but ends up nearly as shallow as its easy-target subjects.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An only intermittently amusing genre parody.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As is often the case with Toback's films, even as you're shaking your head at his shameless self-indulgence, you can't help but keep on watching.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In equal parts earnest and awkward, this romance between a Mormon missionary and an L.A. party boy falls significantly short of its lofty goals.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both Rossi and Charlotte Rampling, as the mother of another young patient, do fine work. But the only surprises come at the end, too late to move us the way they should.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Instructive but aggressively biased liberal history lesson.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Chereau keeps us locked inside their suffocatingly unhappy home, making for an intensely theatrical chamber piece.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bukowski fans - and they are legion - may fill in the blanks from their own knowledge of the writer and find Factotum a more complete character study than it really is. For the rest of us, there are a few laughs - and a corking hangover.
    • New York Daily News
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While the story's silly, the stunts, choreographed by Jaa and popular Thai filmmaker Panna Rittikrai, are spectacular.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's a great deal of potential here, but like Will, Minghella loses his bearings whenever he wanders too far from home.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film nearly drowns in earnest morality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Scurlock barely acknowledges the logical reality of any credit card transaction: If you choose to buy something, you will have to pay for it eventually.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Like "Lions for Lambs," Redacted is more significant in its sense of purpose than its uneven execution.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Christian infuses this familiar story with gentle empathy, which goes a long way in balancing out the more amateurish choices.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's an interesting conceit that quickly becomes a precious annoyance especially since the drama itself is so static.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Immensely moving and strikingly original, Kelly's story of a brilliant, disturbed teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) drowning in the cultural morass of the 1980s now feels bloated.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Kids will love it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Whether today's tweens will go for such wholesomely retro entertainment is questionable, but their parents - at least the ones who once donned rainbow knee socks and too-tight Calvins - will love to love it, baby.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For everyone who has been waiting on a movie in the Ghent dialect, your patience has paid off. Happily, Felix Van Groeningen's low-budget romance is also sly - if utterly superficial - fun.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Roehler aims scattershot barbs at so many targets, from political hypocrisy to suburban entitlement, that he often misses. But whenever he takes the time to line up his toxic arrows, usually with the help of a compellingly squirmy Bleibtreu, he hits the bull's-eye.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Won't change the world, but thanks to its casual intimacy, it was a risk worth taking.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You'll find more authenticity listening in on conversations at your corner diner. But this is a gentler alternative, especially if you prefer your coffee with extra cream and sugar anyway.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though it has a familiar inevitability, the journey is generally compelling, thanks to fierce battles, a gorgeous landscape and heartfelt performances.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Good intentions and some nicely playful moments go a long way toward balancing out Paul Morrison's uneven story of British immigrants in the early 1960s.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Consistently moving but never quite coalesces into a strongly coherent whole.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The many opera scenes are so beautifully mounted, they make up for the moments when the story veers toward melodrama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The latest "Dawson's Creek" alumnus to break out of his WB bonds, Joshua Jackson proves himself all grown up in this sweetly scrappy indie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing truly new to be found here, but Kreuzpaintner treats Tobi's confusion with respect and gentle humor, making this an especially sensitive coming-of-age/coming-out story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Unfortunately, Bate saddles his otherwise compelling chronicle with awkward re-creations and an aggressively overbearing narration.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    With lots of cool gadgets, plenty of silliness and a clever concept guaranteed to appeal to preteens, this should be an unflagging, high-octane romp.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Mark Friedman's script is as unsubtle as Winkler's direction, their sincerity and the subject's sharp immediacy lend the film a certain power.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An invaluable chapter in the story of our city.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Is it possible for an historically -based Holocaust movie to be schmaltzy? This one sure comes close.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A fan's dream, A.J. Schnack's worshipful documentary about the musical duo They Might Be Giants does a nice job reflecting the thoughtful, quirky sensibility of its subjects' songs. Just don't expect to learn much about the guys themselves.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For the broader audience, this seems both suffocating and confusing -- True opera buffs, however, are more likely to feel thrilled, as if they're privy to a private production of the highest caliber.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie is mildly notorious for a (relatively chaste) scene in which Radcliffe's character loses his virginity. But if you're looking to watch this former child star grownup, track down his classic guest turn on TV's "Extras" instead.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are so many small, satisfying moments when the women are allowed to be real that it's a jolt each time they become superficial symbols.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is simply too vast a task for a filmmaker as inexperienced as Estevez. Compared with, say, Robert Altman's similar but far more complex "Nashville," Bobby mostly comes off as a Hollywood public service announcement: passionate, righteous and strikingly removed from reality.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Yeboah is so levelheaded about his own accomplishments that the swelling score and emotional narration from Oprah Winfrey feel embarrassingly sentimental.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although it often feels more like a promotional tool than an objective documentary, there is no denying the emotional resonance propelling Matt Ruskin's first feature.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The intriguing elements never quite coalesce into a consequential whole; we leave this yuppie nightmare feeling both unsettled and unsatisfied.
    • New York Daily News
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Linney hits a single note for her uptight character, while Walters travels the scale indiscriminately. Her outsized eccentric darts from amusing to grating. Only Grint is just right, as the boy they, and the film, can't do without.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Harden has the showier role, a subdued Pantoliano is the movie's real star. Sometimes, the quietest performances are the most powerful.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite several attempts, we're still waiting for the drama that convincingly captures the experienc of soldiers who've fought in Iraq. Stop-Loss" isn't that film, but at the very least its efforts are honorable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Like the average best-man toast, Debbie Isitt's amiable mockumentary has many funny moments, a few touching ones and some that fall just slightly flat.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Surprisingly sweet and smart... LaBeouf does an excellent job, and the talented Beeney is one to watch.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Good or bad, it's either a must-see in your house, or not even on the radar screen.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both Tatum and Dewan know how to move, and their co-stars (including musicians Mario and Drew Sidora) are equally gifted.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most interesting are the founding mothers and fathers of this movement, who first appear amusingly nostalgic and eventually grow exceptionally bitter as they complain about the packaged and ambitious nature of artists today.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Proyas creates an engaging, high-octane energy, boosted by an up-for-anything cast.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Surely no other has done it quite like this group.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Characters do little more than run around the same track incessantly, leaving us waiting for revelations that never arrive.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Occasionally exhilarating documentary.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A movie about identity that can't quite pinpoint its own, Andrew Douglas' road-trip documentary about the Deep South does eventually meander toward audience enlightenment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While this paranoid thriller is overly familiar, it's still plenty unsettling.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The overall effect is that of a deferential video you might find at a Mozart museum: educational, but not exactly inspiring.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's no denying the beauty of Schwartzberg's landscapes, or the power in many of his chosen stories - from the Texas oil well fighters to the Boston father who helps his handicapped son win marathons.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A visually lavish but somewhat sterile adaptation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Angio's film is an excellent introduction, but it won't be long before you realize that his subject is too complex to be contained in a single admiring tribute. When you want to know more - and you will - you'll be glad there's somewhere else to go for a bigger picture.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A shaky but promising debut, Brian Jun's downbeat family drama is likely to make you feel a whole lot better about your own life.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Lingers too long on wordless, symbolic shots of the wall itself. But there's no denying the power of seeing two cultures standing so helplessly on opposite sides of a single fence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film's slightly awkward self-consciousness is balanced by an appealing, gently deadpan performance from Palmieri.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    When Kikijuro goes soft, the film falls apart, with him becoming a slapstick clown, mugging shamelessly to entertain Masao and the audience.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Fay Grim is too uneven to win Hartley many converts, it is laced with enough intelligence and wit to remind longtime fans why they were drawn to his unique vision in the first place.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In performance, Earle comes across as a successor to Woody Guthrie or Johnny Cash. In this fawning portrait, however, he seems more like music's Michael Moore.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This sci-fi fantasy doesn't exactly make sense, but it sure looks cool.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The problem is, Shiva found so many inspirational moments that she wasn't able to edit them into proper focus. As a result, the movie jumps from scene to scene, too scattered to make a strong connection with anything, or anyone, in particular.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Genuinely touching and unquestionably sincere, the movie certainly has heart - but it could have used a little more game.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie drags in some places and throbs in others, but it looks and feels like a bigger production than it actually is. The largely unknown cast is especially strong - this may be your first chance to discover them, but it won't be the last time you see them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A likable, if somewhat earnest, exploration of cultural identity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Yu's experimental approach brings valuable insight to the human condition, the interviews themselves too rarely measure up to her ambitious structure.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ultimately, Dance is unable to connect the many threads of his rather flimsy script, leading to an abrupt and somewhat unsatisfying conclusion. But the journey is worth taking, thanks to the company of its stars.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    When these proudly strutting dandies glide through a grimy basement as if they didn't have a care in the world, their joy is irresistible, and Ronde's point is made.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a little corny and somewhat overlong, but a sweet sensibility and stirring adventure scenes make The Water Horse: Legend of the Deep a welcome gift for anyone looking to keep kids entertained over the holidays.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    To her credit, director Martha Coolidge has crafted a fairy-tale ending that is both old-fashioned and newfangled, allowing her heroine to have it all. But despite a few magic moments, the rest of the film feels stale.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The leaden bits do bring the proceedings to a screeching halt too many times, but the costumes are breathtaking, and the details (like color-coordinated martinis) are dazzling.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is a reasonable choice for bored tweens - as long as they don't demand too much magic from their movies.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There is a great movie in Werner Herzog's Vietnam saga, Rescue Dawn. Unfortunately, it's about 30 minutes long.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Maggio and his stars find some unexpected truths in a familiar tale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A disquieting, and somewhat disjointed, call to arms, Theodore Braun's heartfelt documentary is undeniably important. But it may not be quite focused enough to ignite the passion he so clearly wants his audience to feel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film is somewhat hampered by the refusal of the parents in two of the three families to participate in it. Though the children provide an eloquent, impassioned presence, their parents' absence is overwhelming.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is an insider's tour - the uninitiated are, frankly, not likely to be converted.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Day's primary mistake is an occasional attempt to get serious. With a deft comic touch and a topic that's still timely, he doesn't need to play it straight.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    All the full-blown wackiness turns a rather sweet movie into one that's decidedly overripe.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Green's aggressively whimsical autobiography, which he narrates entirely in rhyme, will challenge all but the most open-minded audiences.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Starts out as fresh as your popcorn, but turns stale before you finish it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Coming from a big shot like Levinson, An Everlasting Piece feels like a gently amusing but undeniably minor diversion that, for whatever reason, needed to be gotten out of his system.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What makes this one stand out is the tugging, melancholy romance hiding behind the curtain of blood.
    • New York Daily News
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The performances are impeccable, but while director Joachim Lafosse carefully creates an atmosphere of suffocating dread, he could have let a little more air into this simmering hothouse.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Looking for plot holes? You can't miss them. But if you go in hoping for a good time, you'll find that, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film is hampered by a somewhat shallow, soap-operatic climax. But Knoller is superb as a practical man trying to balance reason and emotion. Fox does an excellent job capturing the claustrophobia of army life, made all the more suffocating by having to hide one's true self.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Not a single moment of creativity or intrigue is to be found in the big-screen debut of the Disney Channel's most popular sitcom character.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are too many familiar faces in this story, from kindhearted whores to street-urchin bullies. But even if circumstances edge toward the unlikely, Kravchuk and Spiridonov make an effective team, exploring the realities that lead to so much heartbreak for so many children.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's little to enjoy in this unsettling tale, but Doillan's unblinking depiction of manipulation and desperation stays with you long after the characters make the deals that seal their unjust fates.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Feeling very much like it is meant to educate students who don't understand the ruling's relevance, "Speed" doesn't boast much in the way of innovative storytelling. What it does offer is a story that still badly needs to be told.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite the spectacularly cool opening credits and some first-rate animation, the story starts to flag about halfway through.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a decent Valentine's date-night flick, and should earn Reynolds the attention he'll need to snare stronger leading roles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Actors Trevor Wright and Brad Rowe are good enough to turn a formulaic coming-out tale into a sweet romance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The old footage is definitely compelling, but once Moss trains his focus on the quotidian present, the movie takes on too much water to stay afloat.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although the period feeling is convincing, Forman doesn't seem to know exactly what he wants to say about this intensely complex era - and that leaves his cast floundering.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is an important New York story, and Spaisman makes an inspiring subject.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's plenty of passion beneath this movie's unadorned surface.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Dayan's weakly structured biopic Cet Amour-là is, to be kind, less than inspired. But as a showcase for legendary French actress Jeanne Moreau, it's a tour de force.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though intermittently shrill, Shopping does have enough moments of insight to blunt charges of sexist stereotyping.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though it's ultimately rather heavy-handed, this drama about an Iranian-American family is heartfelt and topical.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Only slightly less awkward than its young protagonists, Todd Stephens' earnest coming-of-age drama is able to coast a long way on two engaging performances and some endearing moments.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Will Rugrats fans love it -- Wee, we -- er, oui, oui.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Gram Parsons' last rites were among the most extra­ordinary in rock history. Too bad this retelling of the singer's final adventure is so tame.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The parts are more valuable than the whole in Angelina Maccarone's Unveiled.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Shelly's stylized vision and sentimental intentions don't always gel, they do result in a warm, often charming fantasy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Even when their picture wanders from any reasonable path, it's never less than stunning to look at.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    No matter how silly the situation, each member of the uniformly strong cast creates a nice balance between sentimental and sweet - which is just how every holiday gathering should feel.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film's only dialogue is composed of Young's songs lip-synched and acted out by the cast. This makes for a very literal, somewhat stilted experience.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    No one will accuse The Ringer of being tasteful, but when you're not laughing, you may find yourself genuinely touched.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Simpson and Yates give a good idea why individuals are drawn to extreme sports.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fanning and Russell are a perfect, sweet-and-sour pair. And, of course, the horse is absolutely beautiful - which, in the end, is what this all comes down to, anyway.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Duff is fairly flavorless, Muniz proves that four seasons of "Malcolm" have made him a pro at navigating surreal silliness. Even when the script fails him, his well-honed instincts save the day.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sadr-Ameli's unflagging empathy and Alidousti's confident performance keep us rooting for this young heroine, who refuses to accept the limits forced upon her by both society and the law.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is compelling stuff, but Jones seems almost pathologically averse to upstaging the songs themselves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's the many thoughtful, eloquent interviews with Fellini himself that serve as the heart of the film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though a bit long and occasionally ­awkward, this drama ultimately does ­justice to its inspiration - the true-life tale of boxer-turned-transsexual Nong Toom.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It clearly wants to be more, but it's failed by its lightweight leads.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    With the exception of one truly glorious dance solo, the movie treats its hero - and his equally uncool family - with undisguised disdain.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Lovett's history is heavy on hedonism, but he does deliver a succinct perspective on this celebratory era - between the sad bookends of repression and loss.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's enough affection and insight here to make Lee's next movie worth watching for.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    So desperately eager to please: Gaudreault doesn't offer much in the way of wit or originality, but he's determined to win us over with sheer enthusiasm.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Given the subject matter, the movie is almost fatally lacking in passion.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing here for kids, or, for that matter, anyone who claims to be an adult. But if the title makes perfect sense to you, the movie probably will, too.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Doesn't probe quite as deeply as it should.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's unabashedly derivative and spooky enough to keep you up at night.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Unremittingly explosive, Head-On is not an easy film to watch. It is, however, a memorable one.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A passable, but entirely uninspired "Spy Kids" wanna-be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although the movie is not as hilarious as you'd hope from the screwball setup, Gainsbourg and Attal make a solid comedy team.
    • New York Daily News
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Other than a few witty jokes and a game cast, there's nothing particularly special here.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the results are only moderately compelling, the film's problems stem not from a lack of ideological thrust, but rather from a protagonist who is so phenomenally unlikable.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Offers moments of striking insight amid the inevitable self-indulgence.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie's power comes less from its contrived story than everything else: the stark setting, chaotic energy and authentic cast.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Reygadas is clearly out to shock us, to shake us and show us a host of furious ideas about class, gender, religion, nationality, love - really, there's very little he doesn't throw into this thickly ambiguous stew. If only he hadn't made his deliberately confusing, heavily symbolic story quite so difficult to digest.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most of the supporting cast (including Daphne Rubin-Vega and Michael Jai White) underwhelms. Still, Palladino is a strong lead, and there's no denying the film's emotional core.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Trachtman's gentle profile does make for touching viewing, but she leaves too many questions unanswered.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite its problems, there's a touching sweetness at the heart of Nancy Savoca's intimate family drama about estranged sisters trying to reconnect.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Credit goes to director Sam Taylor-Johnson and her screenwriter, Kelly Marcel, who've stripped the first book of its biggest flaws, while still honoring its essence. And lead Dakota Johnson makes for an ideal heroine, though — as doubters feared — her chemistry with costar Jamie Dornan doesn't always sizzle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Overly familiar but endearing nonetheless, this coming-of-age indie from Alexis Dos Santos is most likely to appeal to those who recognize themselves in the story's lost heroes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script, co-written by Bouchareb, is regrettably simplistic. But Blethyn and Kouyaté inhabit and expand the film's earnestly instructive intentions, leaving us with a deeply-felt experience rather than a naively-sketched lesson.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Whether accurate or not, it's certainly entertaining to watch regal intrigues through the eyes of lady-in-waiting Sidonie (Léa Seydoux). That Jacquot handles the action so lightly is a credit, considering that it takes place during some of the tensest moments of the French Revolution.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the film ultimately falls short of its considerable promise, there's more than enough here to keep thoughtful moviegoers - of any age - intrigued.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The claymation visuals are charming, and an enthusiastic, if somewhat underused, cast works hard to sell the better jokes (though the funniest gag is a silent monkey butler).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As vanity projects go, this one’s unusually well-made — as any portrait of an iconic stylist ought to be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s a pleasure to see Russo back on screen (she’s married to Gilroy). But Nina’s eager complicity is far too easy and every social critique flashes as bright as the neon guiding Lou around back-alley L.A.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Crystal and Midler are such confident pros that their crack timing elevates even substandard material.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Levine offers a mostly sharp takedown of middle-class hipsterdom, and he's terrific as a guy whose easygoing demeanor hides continuing growing pains.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Every aspiring performer will appreciate Gregori Viens' unassuming comedy, which cheerfully skewers industry pretensions and media-fueled trends.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Oddly, Craig Brewer has softened the tone for his remake. But nearly everything else remains intact, and -- surprisingly -- that's just enough to win us over.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's not much to it, but Austin Chick's hyper-focused indie does serve as a nicely assured showcase for lead Josh Hartnett.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A solidly entertaining summer movie is always welcome, even if it can't quite claim to be out of this world.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The truth is, the mystery pales next to the best "X-Files" plots. But fans will appreciate sly references to past episodes, an unexpected appearance from an old friend and the still-poignant bond our heroes share.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fans of the book may resist the efforts of director Tran Anh Hung ("The Scent of Green Papaya"), simply because it would be impossible to capture the essence of Murakami's prose. But this exquisitely filmed, often haunting tragedy is worth taking on its own terms.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The actual Taqwacore movement is distilled in blatantly simplistic fashion, but Zahra does capture the novel's adolescent excitement, in which a new generation rediscovers rebellion all over again.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Korean director Im Sang-soo can't improve on Kim Ki-young's 1960 original, a jarring and operatic cult favorite. Still, he does tweak the themes in intriguing fashion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's all compelling, in the way reading trashy gossip usually is. But without any new perspectives, what's the point?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The introduction isn't as smooth as it could be, but eventually everyone settles into the right groove.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We see brief, graphic shots of naked actors performing sexual acts. But it’s the conversations about what those depictions represent that truly provoke.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Writer/director Patric Chiha brings a knowledgeable weariness to his feature debut, as his story heads toward an end that feels familiar in all the right ways.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There is indeed much beauty on display, from the icy Taiga landscape to the age-old trapping techniques passed on through generations. But this does feel like a lesser Herzog project (he joined on after it was shot). For viewers who don't share his awe, a short film probably would have sufficed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Chow’s movies are always as sweet as they are silly, a combination he once again balances — alongside cool effects — with typically deft irreverence.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a slow time at the cineplex, and the sinister scares served up by Brad Anderson are just spooky enough to freak out undemanding horror fans.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You'll want to see Eytan Fox's acclaimed 2002 drama "Yossi & Jagger" before watching this intimate, often-moving sequel.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Burrell doesn’t quite capture the wry deadpan of the original, but then, neither does the movie. That’s okay.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bertino does an excellent job building dread, especially during the first half of the movie. Every silence, pause and sudden noise startles - and the results, frankly, are more frightening than the graphic torture scenes in movies like "Hostel" and "Saw."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    His outlandish story feels only half-told - though still twice as fascinating as most.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script relies on too many unlikely twists, but Bleibtreu manages to sell them all.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are certain films - let's call them Road Map Movies - that drive you directly from point A to point B to point C, with barely a stop for gas. Cadillac Records is such a film: You see all the major landmarks, but how enlightening can a road trip be if you never even get off the highway?
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The filmmakers' motivation couldn't be clearer: They needed to capture a way of life that may soon exist only on film and in memory.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Avila has a tough task, visualizing violent and complicated events through a child's eyes. The calmer scenes are staged in staid and somewhat clunky fashion, but the graphic animation depicting the worst moments is starkly effective.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fanning's Currie grabs the spotlight immediately, and never lets go.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Quale has brought this anemic franchise back to life, with an unexpected infusion of humor and energy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's hard to complain about a pop culture phenomenon built on unabashed innocence. And anyway, we might as well get used to it: Neither the movie nor the passionate tween squeals at a recent preview leave any doubt that "HSM 4" is on its way - or that the inevitable "College Musical" will be far behind.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Built on dry one-liners, off-kilter timing and self-conscious nostalgia, The Kings of Summer seems expressly designed to delight quirk-loving Sundance audiences.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Burns has assembled such a fine cast that we leave feeling satisfied, as if we didn't get the iPad mini we wanted, but a pretty good novel instead.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the leads do fine work, their efforts often feel slightly futile. Despite a few flashes of the darker tone percolating under the surface, the movie remains too well-mannered to truly pull us in.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The persistent whimsy gets a bit wearisome, but it's hard to dismiss any film so determined to make us happy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Every foul-mouthed joke [McCarthy] cracks, every unexpected physical gag she underplays, is so funny you forget how often we’ve seen this setup. Or, when it comes to women, how rarely.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Philip Roth turns 80 next week, and what better way to celebrate than to serve as the hero of his own story? It’s too bad, though, that this dully conventional biography doesn’t do justice to its subject.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite the hard lessons learned, King seems to have a pretty deep appreciation for Lyle and Nina’s drug of choice — and you’ll probably enjoy the movie a little more if you feel the same. Just think twice if you’re planning to sneak some homemade brownies into the theater when you see it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Davenport herself seems stunned by how complicated the story turns out to be, which just makes her movie all the more worthwhile.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    David Kaplan's sweet, if superficial, fairy tale won't change the world, but it makes nice use of its setting (Chinatown) and visual style (rotoscope animation).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Wang Xiaoshuai’s gently engrossing coming-of-age tale isn’t strikingly unique, but it does possess the heartfelt confidence that comes from autobiographical influence — and natural talent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There is enough here — including the gifted Arena’s barely believable backstory — to keep your head spinning.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    His first-person perspective is unexpectedly frank as he shares some extremely dark moments -- spurred by increasing anger and doubt -- that civilians rarely get to see.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you watched "Project Runway's" first season and wondered what happened to winner Jay McCarroll, here's your chance to find out.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This isn’t the sort of movie that defines anyone’s career, as “Sling Blade” once did. But in an industry averse to risk, passion projects — even uneven ones — are always welcome.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Boasts an unusually strong cast of actors, who boost the slick screenplay into a satisfying popcorn picture.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Hans Petter Moland's dry Scandinavian wit is just amusing enough to keep us interested in this dramedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The truth is, almost everyone planning to see Eclipse will know how things end before the opening credits even appear. So Slade and his cast can be proud that they consistently keep us involved anyway.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The fine cast pushes beyond the script’s limits, even if some, like Hope Davis as Ben’s mom, are mostly wasted.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    No, there’s nothing new here. But sometimes it’s enough to be merely entertained, rather than amazed.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Boote's ambitious goals include finding out how plastics are made and how they're messing with our bodies and our planet.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Alison Klayman's chronicle of Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei is so straightforward that one can't help wishing the subject would make his own, more complex cinematic self-portrait. But for now, Klayman has provided a valuable introduction to a man everyone should know.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This lovely, low-key debut from Aurora Guerrero doesn't aim to make any grand statements. It doesn't need to. The sweetness and sincerity Guerrero and her leads infuse into their intimate coming-of-age story is more than enough.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's cute and funny and sweet, which - as any woman can attest - puts it way ahead of most Friday night options.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The story does feel a little threadbare, and much of the pacing is far too slow for a suspense thriller. But Perez and Leguizamo make an entirely believable couple.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Perry also spices things up with two of his most reliable fallbacks: music, and Madea. Having packed his cast with singers, he allows them all a moment to shine, with songs that deliver his patented lessons (trust in yourself, trust in others, trust in God).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The highlights, of course, are the competitions and duels, choreographed by Sammo Hung.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Schoenaerts capably handles a difficult role that's equal parts pathetic, repulsive and heartbreaking. But you'll need a strong will to spend your time with such a tragically hopeless character.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What the movie lacks in depth it makes up for in surreal humor, and - just as he should - Gainsbourg look-alike Elmosnino seduces us effortlessly.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Scott, Winstead and Howard are charming, while Poehler, O’Hara and Jenkins have a grand time bickering. Since Zicherman doesn’t ask much of us in the first place, they make it easy enough to commit.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are too many overwritten moments designed solely to make the movie more interesting -- when, in fact, they undercut the low-key relatability that serves as its strongest asset.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    So be forewarned: What admirers will consider measured may read, to the unimpressed, as merely slow-moving.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's one thing to sit on your couch watching football in HD. It's another to view one of literature's most enduring fantasies in the same manner. The experience that felt so breathtakingly cinematic in Jackson's "Lord of the Rings" series now seems frustratingly fake.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Is it possible to enjoy the company of the world's most irritating woman? Mike Leigh's surprisingly sunny dramedy makes a pretty good case that, in fact, it is.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Plimpton recorded many of these adventures in books that are well worth seeking out. But if you don’t have enough time to do so, Bean and Poling have assembled a delightful cheat sheet.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    To maximize your entertainment budget, look no further.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Its appeal comes almost entirely from the cast members, who appear genuinely excited to invite us to their party.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A charming coming-of-age drama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are plenty of outrageous characters, several surfing celebrities and a few truly compelling stories.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Don't misunderstand: the proceedings are pretty silly, and the scares were a lot fresher back in 1979, when we first saw "The Amityville Horror." But Cornwell and his cast take things just seriously enough to keep us at least intermittently on edge.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The reason this franchise has been so successful - both on film and in Ann Brashares' original novels - is that, just like the jeans, it suits the needs of vastly different girls.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    When Anderson allows the experts - or simply those most deeply impacted by the changes - to speak, the film has a powerful urgency.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    And now, just as Bella Swan (Stewart) embraces her own eternal power, Breaking Dawn, Part 2 expands with a full intensity of force, stronger and more epic than the films that led to this impactful finale.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is an unashamedly old-fashioned children's movie, and a predictable message is part of the mission. But that's okay; what the movie lacks in surprises, it makes up for in whimsical fun.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This material could so easily have tipped over into false sentimentality, but everyone works with a steady hand. Rebecca Thomas makes an assured debut as both writer and director, the gifted Culkin is excellent as always, and Garner finds lovely shades of nuance in Rachel’s innocent faith.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Much is left undeveloped, from Jane's ghostly anxieties to Rochester's evolving complexity. Wasikowska and Fassbender lack chemistry, and the latter never finds his character's depth.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's hard not to wonder if Press might have offered a similarly impactful portrait in a more concise manner.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Grohl has a longstanding reputation as one of the nicest guys in rock. So it should come as no surprise that this may be the most positive music documentary you'll ever see.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Roth prefers sentimentality to subtlety and cutesiness to complexity. Fortunately, Molina balances Port's precocity, bringing a welcome gravitas to this simply told tale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Those who've read and loved the book should be satisfied, but it's reasonable to hope for more from the final entry.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    With costumes taking precedence over character, the movie ultimately seems more concerned with atmosphere than action.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Why does the movie waste so much time on empty adoration from celebrity fans and skim past the significant tragedies that contributed to her complex life? Parental neglect, sexual assault, severe mental illness — all of these factors shaped the woman Page became. But perhaps even today, no one wants to consider the sadness behind her 1,000-watt smile.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is really the kind of movie that was made to be watched in a haze after midnight, at which point it would all, no doubt, make perfect sense.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Eastwood's performance is the movie's centerpiece, and as you might expect, it's just tough enough to hold everything together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Granted, it's a far cry from the Pixar classics. But Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud's nicely quirky, animated comedy has just enough edge to entertain every member of the family.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Looking for something unusual to see this weekend? Try this cool time capsule, which premiered in 1972 and then disappeared for decades.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It tends to get lost in its own delirium, which will enchant some and drive others bonkers.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He does accomplish his main task, to take us into places civilians rarely go, and give witness to the immense challenges soldiers like his brothers face every second they’re required to be at war.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Lively and affectionate, Matt Tyrnauer's documentary is made for those who believe, as he does, that the work of fashion designer Valentino is worthy of the most respectful chronicle.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We never really forget we're watching two highly paid professionals create a cinematic placebo, strong enough to entertain without making a long-term impact. Fortunately, everyone works just hard enough to sell us on the whole thing anyway.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's no surprise that first-time director Scott Cohen is a nature photographer by trade: he's made one of the most gorgeous movies you'll see this year.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Burton structures the film, right up to the fascinating finale, as both a damning tale of male privilege and a moving story of a woman’s liberation. The actors reflect these themes accordingly. Adams is touchingly restrained and Waltz is monstrously charismatic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Anybody who missed 2006's excellent indie "The Puffy Chair" has another chance to discover the off-kilter world of the Duplass brothers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a fascinating story, and too epic to be contained here. But the directors certainly capture our interest, even as they leave us wanting to know more.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie wouldn’t stand for much of anything without such an effective team to represent the equivocating.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Crowley's biting portrait feels painfully dated, but in a way that's the point: Pioneers fight so those who follow can take their battles for granted.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You may admire Witherspoon’s solid performance, but you won’t forget you’re watching a star.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's little difference between the first and second movies -- both written by Besson -- so the perfunctory story line will feel familiar to fans. But the action, and the head-spinning stunts of those agile lead actors, will never get old.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a tribute to Adrien Brody that Wrecked works as a modestly compelling thriller, since there's almost nothing to see but Brody himself.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both director and cast exhibit the dedication of those who truly believe in the message at hand. But with so much earnestness onscreen, the message occasionally gets in the way of the movie itself.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Dorff and Fanning are perfect in their roles, and Coppola captures the draining narcissism of celebrity culture with the understanding of someone who"s witnessed it all her life.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though John Stockwell's action comedy is shamelessly derivative, his enthusiastic cast propels it much further than it should go.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you are a 12-year-old girl, you are the perfect audience for Monte Carlo.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It often feels as if the filmmakers expect us to be equally seduced by Ruby's wide-eyed winsomeness. That's a shame, as we can sense the deeper film beneath the surface. Because Ruby remains conceptual, this ambitious project lacks the dimension of the similarly meta-minded Charlie Kaufman projects that apparently inspired it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Michael Jackson fans will love Spike Lee's look back at the making of a classic, even if the extensive collection of clips and contemporary interviews - which could have used a firm edit - feels more suited to DVD.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is not, frankly, a movie you'll remember long after you see it. But it has just enough moments of genuine intimacy to indicate that Masterson ought to give directing another try.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A popcorn movie has one goal, and that's to entertain. Immortals meets this criteria handily, and serves as a splendid spectacle besides.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Just as you need two hands to clap, explain frustrated young activists, the ­Dalai Lama requires a reasonable partner with whom to negotiate. And right now, it seems, the Tibetans may as well have their arms tied behind their backs.

Top Trailers