Elizabeth Weitzman
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For 2,220 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Saving Private Ryan
Lowest review score: 0 Breaking Point
Score distribution:
2,220 movie reviews
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    So desperately eager to please: Gaudreault doesn't offer much in the way of wit or originality, but he's determined to win us over with sheer enthusiasm.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Green's aggressively whimsical autobiography, which he narrates entirely in rhyme, will challenge all but the most open-minded audiences.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film is hampered by a somewhat shallow, soap-operatic climax. But Knoller is superb as a practical man trying to balance reason and emotion. Fox does an excellent job capturing the claustrophobia of army life, made all the more suffocating by having to hide one's true self.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Oddly, almost unrelentingly, grim.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Is it possible for an historically -based Holocaust movie to be schmaltzy? This one sure comes close.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In performance, Earle comes across as a successor to Woody Guthrie or Johnny Cash. In this fawning portrait, however, he seems more like music's Michael Moore.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's an interesting conceit that quickly becomes a precious annoyance especially since the drama itself is so static.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Reeder makes a compelling lost soul, so that even the most soddenly moralistic moments are worth watching.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Stallion" has gorgeous cinematography with spectacular landscapes - plus a lazy script, forgettable performances and regrettably uninspired direction.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Given the subject matter, the movie is almost fatally lacking in passion.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Starts out as fresh as your popcorn, but turns stale before you finish it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Simpson and Yates give a good idea why individuals are drawn to extreme sports.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An excellent idea that never quite pans out.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In equal parts earnest and awkward, this romance between a Mormon missionary and an L.A. party boy falls significantly short of its lofty goals.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A passable, but entirely uninspired "Spy Kids" wanna-be.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film's only dialogue is composed of Young's songs lip-synched and acted out by the cast. This makes for a very literal, somewhat stilted experience.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    With lots of cool gadgets, plenty of silliness and a clever concept guaranteed to appeal to preteens, this should be an unflagging, high-octane romp.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The laconic Lemarquis does a solid job carrying off Kári's dryly mordant wit, making this eccentric story well worth watching.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's little to enjoy in this unsettling tale, but Doillan's unblinking depiction of manipulation and desperation stays with you long after the characters make the deals that seal their unjust fates.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    To her credit, director Martha Coolidge has crafted a fairy-tale ending that is both old-fashioned and newfangled, allowing her heroine to have it all. But despite a few magic moments, the rest of the film feels stale.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Chéreau keenly understands both his characters and their unwanted world, from the dehumanization that occurs the moment one enters a hospital to the hope and fear that take over when one leaves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Because Albertina Carri spends so much time skirting relevant issues, her self-consciously experimental examination into her parents' murder feels like a worthy movie that simply wasn't ready to be made.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Slams us with an absurdly repugnant ending, for absolutely no reason other than to shock viewers and generate cheap controversy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Only slightly less awkward than its young protagonists, Todd Stephens' earnest coming-of-age drama is able to coast a long way on two engaging performances and some endearing moments.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are movies that are important, and then there are movies that simply look and act as if they're important. With its arthouse cast, hipster credentials and ominous atmosphere, Young Adam never bothers to reach for real significance.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most of the supporting cast (including Daphne Rubin-Vega and Michael Jai White) underwhelms. Still, Palladino is a strong lead, and there's no denying the film's emotional core.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Plays strictly to formula, the only real surprise is its apparently ironic title.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Babenco does a better job with place than with people: His explosively overcrowded jail is a teeming tenement, which makes the inevitable climax feel, finally, like something real.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Unfortunately, despite some strong performances, the movie never really makes a case for its own existence.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Feeling very much like it is meant to educate students who don't understand the ruling's relevance, "Speed" doesn't boast much in the way of innovative storytelling. What it does offer is a story that still badly needs to be told.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    With the exception of one truly glorious dance solo, the movie treats its hero - and his equally uncool family - with undisguised disdain.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Gram Parsons' last rites were among the most extra­ordinary in rock history. Too bad this retelling of the singer's final adventure is so tame.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This sci-fi fantasy doesn't exactly make sense, but it sure looks cool.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's no denying the beauty of Schwartzberg's landscapes, or the power in many of his chosen stories - from the Texas oil well fighters to the Boston father who helps his handicapped son win marathons.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's the subject himself, still brimming with passion in his 80s, who provides the most inspiring moments.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    John Greyson and Jack Lewis' experimental drama, about two prisoners who have a dangerous affair, is a challenging, flawed look at a little-known slice of history.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although all the key players are back - including, fans will be glad to hear, Heather Matarazzo as cynical sidekick Lilly Moscovitz - the freshness of the first is long gone.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Immensely moving and strikingly original, Kelly's story of a brilliant, disturbed teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) drowning in the cultural morass of the 1980s now feels bloated.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's hard to remain unmoved by Kang's deeply heartfelt homage to his nation's past.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Day's primary mistake is an occasional attempt to get serious. With a deft comic touch and a topic that's still timely, he doesn't need to play it straight.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both Rossi and Charlotte Rampling, as the mother of another young patient, do fine work. But the only surprises come at the end, too late to move us the way they should.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As for Scott, his rather wry interpretation is competent, but neither daring nor insightful enough to arouse any great passion.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film is somewhat hampered by the refusal of the parents in two of the three families to participate in it. Though the children provide an eloquent, impassioned presence, their parents' absence is overwhelming.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are so many small, satisfying moments when the women are allowed to be real that it's a jolt each time they become superficial symbols.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Some of the contemporary winks are questionable, but others are undeniably sharp.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Coming from a big shot like Levinson, An Everlasting Piece feels like a gently amusing but undeniably minor diversion that, for whatever reason, needed to be gotten out of his system.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although the movie is not as hilarious as you'd hope from the screwball setup, Gainsbourg and Attal make a solid comedy team.
    • New York Daily News
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For the most part, the Plastics' music -- is not extraordinary. But as it's told here, their story is.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The special effects here are surprisingly smooth, and everyone seems to be having fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie is so glacially paced and underdeveloped that it often feels as numb as its grieving hero.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Mostly, Benazzo and Day leave us alone to take in the extraordinary sights and sounds.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though a bit long and occasionally ­awkward, this drama ultimately does ­justice to its inspiration - the true-life tale of boxer-turned-transsexual Nong Toom.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Unremittingly explosive, Head-On is not an easy film to watch. It is, however, a memorable one.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Occasionally exhilarating documentary.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sticking closely to formula, Disney delivers a sweet script and charming storybook backgrounds, with serviceable, if sappy, songs from Carly Simon.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film nearly drowns in earnest morality.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A visually lavish but somewhat sterile adaptation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Maggio and his stars find some unexpected truths in a familiar tale.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Smart, imaginative - and nearly ­impossible to watch.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Actors do an excellent job portraying young people struggling with an almost manic paranoia.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Zingaretti does a fine job shading a character that is written as an unalloyed saint.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ultimately, Dance is unable to connect the many threads of his rather flimsy script, leading to an abrupt and somewhat unsatisfying conclusion. But the journey is worth taking, thanks to the company of its stars.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's plenty of passion beneath this movie's unadorned surface.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Modest but memorable.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The time-traveling is a little awkward, and a mawkish turn of events feels forced and unnecessary.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For everyone who has been waiting on a movie in the Ghent dialect, your patience has paid off. Happily, Felix Van Groeningen's low-budget romance is also sly - if utterly superficial - fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A movie about identity that can't quite pinpoint its own, Andrew Douglas' road-trip documentary about the Deep South does eventually meander toward audience enlightenment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Consistently moving but never quite coalesces into a strongly coherent whole.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ultimately, the project suffers from a nearly complete lack of contextualization. We could surely use some background on Goebbels' complicity in mass genocide while listening to him brag about his beautiful, healthy children and happy family life.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Lingers too long on wordless, symbolic shots of the wall itself. But there's no denying the power of seeing two cultures standing so helplessly on opposite sides of a single fence.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is an insider's tour - the uninitiated are, frankly, not likely to be converted.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A good movie that could have been better, Joseph Cedar's sensitive Israeli drama falters when he trades sociological observations for political ones.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Panayotopoulou does handle the material with sensitivity, but she relies too much on her young hero's unlikely precocity, which unwittingly diminishes the intensity of a child's very real grief.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Instructive but aggressively biased liberal history lesson.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Thought-provoking, but not quite as profound as it pretends to be.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Whether today's tweens will go for such wholesomely retro entertainment is questionable, but their parents - at least the ones who once donned rainbow knee socks and too-tight Calvins - will love to love it, baby.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though intermittently shrill, Shopping does have enough moments of insight to blunt charges of sexist stereotyping.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing truly new to be found here, but Kreuzpaintner treats Tobi's confusion with respect and gentle humor, making this an especially sensitive coming-of-age/coming-out story.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fanning and Russell are a perfect, sweet-and-sour pair. And, of course, the horse is absolutely beautiful - which, in the end, is what this all comes down to, anyway.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Unfortunately, Bate saddles his otherwise compelling chronicle with awkward re-creations and an aggressively overbearing narration.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Yeboah is so levelheaded about his own accomplishments that the swelling score and emotional narration from Oprah Winfrey feel embarrassingly sentimental.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Lovett's history is heavy on hedonism, but he does deliver a succinct perspective on this celebratory era - between the sad bookends of repression and loss.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Jon Favreau's adaptation of Chris Van Allsburg's kid-lit adventure of the same name, more than fills the bill - though it's unlikely to draw anyone over the age of 11 (not counting baby-sitters).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    When these proudly strutting dandies glide through a grimy basement as if they didn't have a care in the world, their joy is irresistible, and Ronde's point is made.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though he doesn't possess the dangerous confusion of his tragically misguided heroes, veteran director Marco Bellocchio does share their capacity for raising thought-provoking points that end in an ineffectual tangle.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The parts are more valuable than the whole in Angelina Maccarone's Unveiled.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A wild dream that spins into a nightmare, Moonlight isn't quite as provocative as it aims to be. But it will stick in your mind, and may even disturb your sleep.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    No one will accuse The Ringer of being tasteful, but when you're not laughing, you may find yourself genuinely touched.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As complex as its subject's life and - like her - both flawed and fascinating.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sadr-Ameli's unflagging empathy and Alidousti's confident performance keep us rooting for this young heroine, who refuses to accept the limits forced upon her by both society and the law.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fortunately, Tushinski strikes the right balance throughout, interspersing old erotic photos and stills from Berlin's adult films with entertaining, current-day sound bites.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Angio's film is an excellent introduction, but it won't be long before you realize that his subject is too complex to be contained in a single admiring tribute. When you want to know more - and you will - you'll be glad there's somewhere else to go for a bigger picture.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's both a compliment and a criticism to say that Michèle Ohayon's scrappy documentary ends much too quickly. Every moment of this story - about America's unlikeliest matchmaker - is fascinating. We just need more of them.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Reygadas is clearly out to shock us, to shake us and show us a host of furious ideas about class, gender, religion, nationality, love - really, there's very little he doesn't throw into this thickly ambiguous stew. If only he hadn't made his deliberately confusing, heavily symbolic story quite so difficult to digest.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ristovski needs us to feel his nation's torment, and he succeeds.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The way he presents his romantic history is both clever and entertaining, but after a while the story becomes tediously familiar.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As is often the case with Toback's films, even as you're shaking your head at his shameless self-indulgence, you can't help but keep on watching.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's like racing through a detective novel, only to find the last page has been torn out.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The problem is, Shiva found so many inspirational moments that she wasn't able to edit them into proper focus. As a result, the movie jumps from scene to scene, too scattered to make a strong connection with anything, or anyone, in particular.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Roehler aims scattershot barbs at so many targets, from political hypocrisy to suburban entitlement, that he often misses. But whenever he takes the time to line up his toxic arrows, usually with the help of a compellingly squirmy Bleibtreu, he hits the bull's-eye.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Genuinely touching and unquestionably sincere, the movie certainly has heart - but it could have used a little more game.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Gilbert blatantly takes Chong's side, so your level of empathy will rise or fall depending on how strongly you connect with his subject's hazy, if enthusiastic, dedication to "the pursuit of righteous happiness."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most interesting are the founding mothers and fathers of this movement, who first appear amusingly nostalgic and eventually grow exceptionally bitter as they complain about the packaged and ambitious nature of artists today.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Chereau keeps us locked inside their suffocatingly unhappy home, making for an intensely theatrical chamber piece.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An invaluable chapter in the story of our city.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A natural crowd-pleaser, this year's big Sundance award winner is both overly familiar and surprisingly fresh.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both Tatum and Dewan know how to move, and their co-stars (including musicians Mario and Drew Sidora) are equally gifted.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bukowski fans - and they are legion - may fill in the blanks from their own knowledge of the writer and find Factotum a more complete character study than it really is. For the rest of us, there are a few laughs - and a corking hangover.
    • New York Daily News
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While the boys' fates do seem a little too predestined, that may well be Arslan's intention. When you're idling in no man's land, it's all too easy to get uprooted.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Offers moments of striking insight amid the inevitable self-indulgence.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While the story's silly, the stunts, choreographed by Jaa and popular Thai filmmaker Panna Rittikrai, are spectacular.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's enough affection and insight here to make Lee's next movie worth watching for.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The latest "Dawson's Creek" alumnus to break out of his WB bonds, Joshua Jackson proves himself all grown up in this sweetly scrappy indie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Like the average best-man toast, Debbie Isitt's amiable mockumentary has many funny moments, a few touching ones and some that fall just slightly flat.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    At its best when its heroes race furiously toward their missions, most of which involve jumping out of a helicopter into surging waves.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Linney hits a single note for her uptight character, while Walters travels the scale indiscriminately. Her outsized eccentric darts from amusing to grating. Only Grint is just right, as the boy they, and the film, can't do without.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    With some movies, you know exactly what you're going to see before you even enter the theater, and Michael Mayer's Flicka is one of them: You've got your girl, you've got your horse, and you've got your strict father trying to keep them apart.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Selim's script doesn't hit new territory, but beautiful cinematography takes it just far enough.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A meandering, amusing trifle, Werner Herzog's latest film is as cheekily flaky as his recent "Grizzly Man" was sharply down-to-earth.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Good intentions and some nicely playful moments go a long way toward balancing out Paul Morrison's uneven story of British immigrants in the early 1960s.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He may earn his living as a cab driver, but the blank hero of Martín Rejtman's sardonic Argentinean comedy is perfectly content to hitch his way through life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Because although there are some very striking moments in Neil Armfield's debut, there are simply not enough to keep us absorbed the way a movie should.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is simply too vast a task for a filmmaker as inexperienced as Estevez. Compared with, say, Robert Altman's similar but far more complex "Nashville," Bobby mostly comes off as a Hollywood public service announcement: passionate, righteous and strikingly removed from reality.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Proudly, and often hilariously, juvenile, "Destiny" is packed with typically grandiose Tenacious D anthems - the sort that thrill 15-year-old boys listening alone in their bedrooms.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's a great deal of potential here, but like Will, Minghella loses his bearings whenever he wanders too far from home.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Even with its first-rate cast, current political relevance and tangled mysteries, The Good Shepherd remains as remote as Wilson himself. But frankly, if the lives of CIA spies are really this dreary, they may as well keep their secrets to themselves.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What it is, to borrow a word from the ever-eloquent spider Charlotte, is average. Don't misunderstand: While never quite enchanting, this "Web" is perfectly entertaining. But it could - and should -have been so much more.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Mark Friedman's script is as unsubtle as Winkler's direction, their sincerity and the subject's sharp immediacy lend the film a certain power.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Think you're too tough for a sentimental comeback story? Well, a few minutes with Rocky Balboa might just knock the cynic out of you.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Miller and Pearce are admirably determined to do their complex characters justice, but the generic script turns them into enigmatic symbols, locked in a hollow time capsule.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though it has a familiar inevitability, the journey is generally compelling, thanks to fierce battles, a gorgeous landscape and heartfelt performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are too many familiar faces in this story, from kindhearted whores to street-urchin bullies. But even if circumstances edge toward the unlikely, Kravchuk and Spiridonov make an effective team, exploring the realities that lead to so much heartbreak for so many children.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Scurlock barely acknowledges the logical reality of any credit card transaction: If you choose to buy something, you will have to pay for it eventually.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    At its best, TMNT does recall the slangy fun of the series' glory days. But there are too many moments when it feels as stale as one of Mikey's half-eaten pizzas.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing here for kids, or, for that matter, anyone who claims to be an adult. But if the title makes perfect sense to you, the movie probably will, too.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Short, sharp and to the point, Vacancy has a single goal, and that is to scare the hell out of you.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Shelly's stylized vision and sentimental intentions don't always gel, they do result in a warm, often charming fantasy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You'll need a strong stomach, but director Christopher Smith mixes lots of laughs into the gore. Despite its predictable finish, Severance is bloody good fun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although it often feels more like a promotional tool than an objective documentary, there is no denying the emotional resonance propelling Matt Ruskin's first feature.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The overall effect is that of a deferential video you might find at a Mozart museum: educational, but not exactly inspiring.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The thin, whimsical story is really better suited to a short film, but Hall deserves a lot of credit for carrying off such unusual material.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Fay Grim is too uneven to win Hartley many converts, it is laced with enough intelligence and wit to remind longtime fans why they were drawn to his unique vision in the first place.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The performances are impeccable, but while director Joachim Lafosse carefully creates an atmosphere of suffocating dread, he could have let a little more air into this simmering hothouse.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Amu
    As writer, director and producer, Bose has taken on more than she can handle - a fact increasingly obvious each time she stumbles over political themes. But she has a genuine gift for atmosphere, making the many wordless scenes, in teeming streets and on crowded trains, the movie's best.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The beautiful black-and-white photography - and disappointingly sappy ending - are the only remotely sober elements here, thanks to Besson's loopy script and Debbouze's very funny turn as a loser who simply can't believe his luck.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A shaky but promising debut, Brian Jun's downbeat family drama is likely to make you feel a whole lot better about your own life.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Putting an entertainingly outlandish spin on "Matrix"-style action, Bekmambetov leans toward flamboyant special effects and operatic overacting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both the humor and horror are as broad as the side of the Oldfields' barn, but King and the cast are clearly having fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both neurotic and endearing, it's so carefully accessorized you may not even notice that, at heart, it's a standard-issue romantic comedy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Kim is unable to keep us riveted on her near-silent performance, the script and direction have a gentle sensitivity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A fairly average movie about a very unusual child, Vitus does have an earnest charm.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There is a great movie in Werner Herzog's Vietnam saga, Rescue Dawn. Unfortunately, it's about 30 minutes long.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Visually arresting but thematically uneven, Gerardo Naranjo's fictional snapshot of a gritty Mexican beach is simply too desperate to shock us.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Although the period feeling is convincing, Forman doesn't seem to know exactly what he wants to say about this intensely complex era - and that leaves his cast floundering.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The whole thing burns out well before the director reaches his ­final destination.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Christian infuses this familiar story with gentle empathy, which goes a long way in balancing out the more amateurish choices.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We can't quite shake the feeling we've seen this all done before, and better.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Looking for plot holes? You can't miss them. But if you go in hoping for a good time, you'll find that, too.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If it's not quite the best Will Ferrell movie he never made, Balls of Fury is, at the very least, a lot funnier than it has a right to be.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie is mildly notorious for a (relatively chaste) scene in which Radcliffe's character loses his virginity. But if you're looking to watch this former child star grownup, track down his classic guest turn on TV's "Extras" instead.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are no surprises here, in other words, but there aren't supposed to be: This is a comfort film, the on-screen equivalent of mac and cheese - though with a splash of truffle oil to class things up.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You'll find more authenticity listening in on conversations at your corner diner. But this is a gentler alternative, especially if you prefer your coffee with extra cream and sugar anyway.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is a reasonable choice for bored tweens - as long as they don't demand too much magic from their movies.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sweet it is. Remotely connected to real life, however, it is not.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Harden has the showier role, a subdued Pantoliano is the movie's real star. Sometimes, the quietest performances are the most powerful.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Even when their picture wanders from any reasonable path, it's never less than stunning to look at.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Once again, we chart the growth of a woman and a country at the same time, a tough assignment that Harper tackles with humor and passion (even if her Kissinger impersonation could use a little work).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A disquieting, and somewhat disjointed, call to arms, Theodore Braun's heartfelt documentary is undeniably important. But it may not be quite focused enough to ignite the passion he so clearly wants his audience to feel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    No matter how silly the situation, each member of the uniformly strong cast creates a nice balance between sentimental and sweet - which is just how every holiday gathering should feel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Yu's experimental approach brings valuable insight to the human condition, the interviews themselves too rarely measure up to her ambitious structure.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Like "Lions for Lambs," Redacted is more significant in its sense of purpose than its uneven execution.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bednarczyk's natural instincts put most programmed Hollywood moppets to shame, and the quietly affecting O'Keefe shows genuine talent.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a little corny and somewhat overlong, but a sweet sensibility and stirring adventure scenes make The Water Horse: Legend of the Deep a welcome gift for anyone looking to keep kids entertained over the holidays.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie's power comes less from its contrived story than everything else: the stark setting, chaotic energy and authentic cast.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Trachtman's gentle profile does make for touching viewing, but she leaves too many questions unanswered.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a decent Valentine's date-night flick, and should earn Reynolds the attention he'll need to snare stronger leading roles.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A world designed for children, and most of the grownups involved don't quite understand it - on or offscreen.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An endearing premise and fanciful spirit aren't quite enough to rescue a film that has more heart than smarts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are some heartbreaking moments here, from the reactions of recent amputees to the tearful doctors and nurses trying hard to remain professional. And there is no question that Sanders has discovered a worthy subject. He just hasn't found the right way to approach it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's left to the ideally cast McDormand to keep everything on track and, as expected, she weathers every tonal change with competence, confidence and a perfectly stiff upper lip.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is an important New York story, and Spaisman makes an inspiring subject.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Actors Trevor Wright and Brad Rowe are good enough to turn a formulaic coming-out tale into a sweet romance.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Weddell's accomplishments are inspiring, we would have been better served by a more impartial portrait. With its reverent tone, the movie often feels more like it was made by a doting granddaughter than a pro filmmaker.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite several attempts, we're still waiting for the drama that convincingly captures the experienc of soldiers who've fought in Iraq. Stop-Loss" isn't that film, but at the very least its efforts are honorable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Intelligent thriller--turns-- into an embarrassing gothic horror show.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Because (Vilanch) is such a character, the movie ends up being a lot of fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's not a single moment when you forget it's Weaver; she always seems to be inhabiting this poor character's soul for her own purposes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both director and cast exhibit the dedication of those who truly believe in the message at hand. But with so much earnestness onscreen, the message occasionally gets in the way of the movie itself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The wisecracking Chan and the stoic Li play off their on-screen images with good humor, and if they don't have the agility they once did, it's still a joy to watch them make the most of Yuen Woo-ping's impressive choreography.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As fans of "Freaks and Geeks" know, Segel is a master in the art of humiliation, and it's been a long time since we've seen anyone debase himself so thoroughly for our amusement.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The story does feel a little threadbare, and much of the pacing is far too slow for a suspense thriller. But Perez and Leguizamo make an entirely believable couple.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Not all of the movie works - in fact, huge portions don't - but there are enough striking moments to make a lasting impact. How ironic: In this fairy-tale of arrested development, Korine has created his most mature movie yet.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Redbelt will fascinate those who share David Mamet's interest in mixed martial arts. But its hold may be weaker on those who don't.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Pray unfolds the family's story with patience and skill, making it both a compliment and a complaint to say that he leaves us wanting to know much more.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are enough droll moments to spark cult status, and McBride's commitment is impressive.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We never learn why most of his subjects remain loyal to a faith that so explicitly rejects them.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bertino does an excellent job building dread, especially during the first half of the movie. Every silence, pause and sudden noise startles - and the results, frankly, are more frightening than the graphic torture scenes in movies like "Hostel" and "Saw."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is an unashamedly old-fashioned children's movie, and a predictable message is part of the mission. But that's okay; what the movie lacks in surprises, it makes up for in whimsical fun.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's barely a frame that doesn't look stretched, smashed or otherwise harassed. Imagine "The Matrix" on speed, and you're halfway there.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Davenport herself seems stunned by how complicated the story turns out to be, which just makes her movie all the more worthwhile.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's still a lot to like here, but ultimately the movie reflects its hapless hero a little too well. While we're constantly rooting for it to succeed, the finish line seems forever out of reach.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Creating a hypnotically digressive travelogue, Herzog wanders from soul to soul, asking deceptively mild questions to potent effect.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's certainly been a while since we've seen a movie this resolutely old-fashioned. But while the script feels a little stiff and moralistic at times, it's hard to fault a film with such an intelligent, good-hearted heroine.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Argento and Aattou lack the searing chemistry needed, the social politics are consistently intriguing, and everything - not to mention everyone -looks absolutely stunning.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The truth is, the mystery pales next to the best "X-Files" plots. But fans will appreciate sly references to past episodes, an unexpected appearance from an old friend and the still-poignant bond our heroes share.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's not much to it, but Austin Chick's hyper-focused indie does serve as a nicely assured showcase for lead Josh Hartnett.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Intermittent shots of actress Emmanuelle Seigner embodying the lyrics are surplus.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Since Alfred Hitchcock set the standard for strangers-on-a-train thrillers, Anderson has a lot to live up to. He falls short of creating a new classic, but he does manage to keep us on edge for most of the movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The kids here do come across as genuine people, struggling with issues everyone can understand.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Anybody who missed 2006's excellent indie "The Puffy Chair" has another chance to discover the off-kilter world of the Duplass brothers.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    "I hate this stinkin' war," Neil Young announces in this chronicle of CSNY's "Freedom of Speech Tour," and the rest of the movie is just as unapologetically blunt.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    By the end, Holdridge has captured the bittersweet complexities of romance with a wisdom that proves surprisingly seductive.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Often insightful and more than a little depressing, this is a story that only gets uglier as it goes on.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The reason this franchise has been so successful - both on film and in Ann Brashares' original novels - is that, just like the jeans, it suits the needs of vastly different girls.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Every generation deserves its ultimate high school romance, and Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist clearly aims to take the slot currently open. Despite a valiant attempt, though, it doesn't quite make the grade.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    David Kaplan's sweet, if superficial, fairy tale won't change the world, but it makes nice use of its setting (Chinatown) and visual style (rotoscope animation).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Very little actually happens, since most of the time Mr. Shi sits alone in Yilan's empty apartment, wondering how to help her. But there's a gentle beauty in these long, anguished silences, and Wang and his actors make the most of it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the leads do fine work, their efforts often feel slightly futile. Despite a few flashes of the darker tone percolating under the surface, the movie remains too well-mannered to truly pull us in.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A rousing period drama with all the familiar trimmings: gorgeous costumes, palatial settings and romantic intrigue.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's disappointing when a big-screen romance can't match up to the one in your imagination, at any age.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's hard to complain about a pop culture phenomenon built on unabashed innocence. And anyway, we might as well get used to it: Neither the movie nor the passionate tween squeals at a recent preview leave any doubt that "HSM 4" is on its way - or that the inevitable "College Musical" will be far behind.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A Disney movie about a Disney project, this slick sailing documentary feels a little too self-promotional, almost like an attraction you might stumble into at Epcot. But at least it turns out to be a fairly wild ride.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the film ultimately falls short of its considerable promise, there's more than enough here to keep thoughtful moviegoers - of any age - intrigued.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Is it possible to enjoy the company of the world's most irritating woman? Mike Leigh's surprisingly sunny dramedy makes a pretty good case that, in fact, it is.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Frontrunners is a lot rougher than Nanette Burstein's recent, similar documentary, "American Teen," and its comparable lack of gloss is both an asset and a flaw.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script is compelling, the direction confident, the production values professional. But it does not, in the end, feel real.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If "Saw V" offers an example of how little filmmakers can get away with, Splinter proves how much a director can do with next to nothing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Who knew? Turns out, Jean-Claude Van Damme is a funny guy, and a pretty good actor, too. Fans may already be aware of this, but JCVD is likely to introduce a whole new Van Damme to everybody else.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The script is basically a retread of every other AARP comedy, from "Grumpy Old Men" to "Wild Hogs." The laughs, in other words, are of the Viagra and kidney stone variety.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A fun project that doesn't quite reach its potential, Josh Koury's doc is still worthwhile for anyone who can't wait until 2009 to see Harry Potter back on the big screen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are certain films - let's call them Road Map Movies - that drive you directly from point A to point B to point C, with barely a stop for gas. Cadillac Records is such a film: You see all the major landmarks, but how enlightening can a road trip be if you never even get off the highway?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Provocatively intentioned, The Reader is a movie worth seeing - the kind of film you'll think about for days afterward. But when all is said and done, you're likely to wonder why the impact wasn't greater still.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Eastwood's performance is the movie's centerpiece, and as you might expect, it's just tough enough to hold everything together.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's a formula, all right, but a strong cast goes a long way toward carrying it off. We get one, for the most part, in Alfredo De Villa's cheerfully familiar dramedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Passionate and ambitious, John Walter's chronicle of a Public Theater production is too scattered for broad appeal. But those who connect with his themes will find themselves quickly drawn in.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This mundane romantic comedy is notable for one reason only: its leading couple.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Refusing to be rushed, Doris Dörrie blends individual experiences with universal emotions to create a quietly moving study of self-discovery.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A limited amount of original footage -- awkwardly enhanced with reenactments -- gives the film a somewhat narrow focus. But in a way, the dry tone fits.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though he plays two other roles, Perry only really cuts loose when he dons Madea's housecoat, turning her into a devilishly funny voice of reason. Likewise, the movie tenses up when she's offscreen, becoming the sort of moralistic soap opera we've seen from Perry before.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This isn't a family -- or a film -- you'll ­easily forget.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As its defiantly bland title suggests, Fighting is a bare-bones effort that tries just hard enough to keep us watching. By making good use of its New York setting, Montiel does bring a certain indie grit to the generic story.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While "Escape" was superior in story, "Race" does commit to an impressive scope. What it is, really, is a big-studio popcorn flick that just happens to be made for tweens.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite the overlong running time, the action moves smoothly and swiftly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director James Gray is best known for hard-edged dramas like "Little Odessa," so it's surprising to find he has such a well-developed romantic side. This isn't your average date-night flick, though.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you watched "Project Runway's" first season and wondered what happened to winner Jay McCarroll, here's your chance to find out.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Bruce Hendricks makes little use of the 3D technology, though the gimmick does distract from the fact that we learn nothing new about the guys. It would have been interesting to hear something of their history, especially given their much-discussed Evangelical background.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The lack of subtlety indicates that this is a first film, but the passion and insights are strong enough to make you wonder what he'll (Webber) do next.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Anyone looking for something original or unexpected should check out the trio of short films that comprise this entertaining ode to the titular city.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He does accomplish his main task, to take us into places civilians rarely go, and give witness to the immense challenges soldiers like his brothers face every second they’re required to be at war.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is not, frankly, a movie you'll remember long after you see it. But it has just enough moments of genuine intimacy to indicate that Masterson ought to give directing another try.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Rafferty keeps the structure so blandly standard, the title is nearly the most intriguing element of the whole film.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Directors Jon Hart and Matthew Kaufman don’t delve deeply enough into the psyche of club founder Larry Levenson or the culture he exploited. But they do present an entertaining snapshot of his brief reign as New York’s self-appointed King of Swing.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Don't misunderstand: the proceedings are pretty silly, and the scares were a lot fresher back in 1979, when we first saw "The Amityville Horror." But Cornwell and his cast take things just seriously enough to keep us at least intermittently on edge.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Barratier directs with a jaunty artifice more typically seen on stage, but with the exception of Arnezeder, his cast turns theatricality to its advantage. They're offering us a sunny fantasy during a cloudy time, and seem well aware that we're unlikely to resist.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Like 2003's "Lizzie McGuire" movie, "Hannah" breaks little new ground but makes the big screen shift with liveliness and sense of humor impressively intact.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though Mann and Perry are game, it's Efron who carries the movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A message movie that's genuinely worth watching.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Lively and affectionate, Matt Tyrnauer's documentary is made for those who believe, as he does, that the work of fashion designer Valentino is worthy of the most respectful chronicle.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    He may be a first-time feature ­director, but music video master Benny Boom clearly knows how to pull a midlevel movie ­together.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Some of the accusations feel more sordid than satisfying.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If "Up" is the animated equivalent of an ice cream sundae, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs is the Popsicle: Neither as rich nor as memorable, but more than welcome on a long, hot summer day.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Far surpasses original.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Provides just enough smart, silly fun for families desperately seeking an easy (and air-conditioned) escape from hazy August humidity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    9
    Shane Acker's underwritten but beautifully animated debut is both an ode to technology and a warning against it. Perhaps unintentionally, the film itself echoes those themes.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A horror flick that's all talk and (almost) no action? The risk pays off better than you'd think.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Intermittently compelling biography.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though we see the same man throughout the bumpy tour captured here -- always calm, steady, faithful -- it's bound to prove an enlightening portrait for those who know him only as the guy who once worked with Peter Gabriel.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This Norwegian zombie flick is perfect for those who just want a few good jolts and whole lot of gore.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie’s shallow amusements do make for an ideal guilty pleasure, especially since the actors seem to be having so much fun. Bates, marching around like an overstuffed pigeon, is a reliable scene-stealer, while the two leads make an entirely convincing couple.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As with so many message movies, this one trades ­nuance for naked outrage. The filmmakers'heartfelt intent is admirable, but right now they’re competing with a more compellingly told reality.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While Cera is adorable, Yi’s faux ­naiveté is overplayed and her philosophical musings are underwhelming. But you won’t soon forget the real-life couples she interviews.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Few of the parts harmonize ­properly, leaving us with provocative fragments rather than an electrifying whole.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Fans of Andrew Bujalski's previous mumblecore movies are the likeliest audience for his latest, a modest, slice-of-life indie that doesn't quite live up to his ­earlier efforts.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The beginning is awkwardly earnest, but the play matures considerably while retaining its youthful energy and enthusiasm
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are a select few artists who can take the same materials used by everyone else and create a masterpiece. Coco Chanel was one of them. Director Anne Fontaine is not.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Weitz takes a looser approach than the series’ last director, Catherine Hardwicke, did. He has a better sense of humor, too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It tends to get lost in its own delirium, which will enchant some and drive others bonkers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The entire cast, in fact, seems to be having fun, with Affleck and Koechner cheerfully stealing each one of their scenes. And the jokes come often enough to leave us consistently amused and occasionally delighted.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    While "Twilight" will make more money and get more attention, the darkly comic Cirque du Freak boasts the shaggy charm of the natural underdog.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Anyone with a fondness for the midcentury cartoons and films that inspired this scrappy comedy will appreciate the latest trip to the titular British boarding school.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Just like the movies it parodies, this one feels over long before it's actually done.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Overly familiar but endearing nonetheless, this coming-of-age indie from Alexis Dos Santos is most likely to appeal to those who recognize themselves in the story's lost heroes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Perry also spices things up with two of his most reliable fallbacks: music, and Madea. Having packed his cast with singers, he allows them all a moment to shine, with songs that deliver his patented lessons (trust in yourself, trust in others, trust in God).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The result would make an excellent inspirational video for aspiring players, but it's not quite ready for the pros.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's nothing exceptional about Jane Campion's historical biography, but it's a sufficiently lovely tale to suit romantics with a taste for intimate period dramas.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The performances save the movie from a treacly inevitability.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In his directorial debut, Krasinski doesn't seem to believe in his hideous men so much as he appears intimidated by them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Helstein doesn't have to work so hard to remind us of her subject's gravity; the stories chronicled are chilling enough without embellishment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's plenty to appreciate in Chris Rock's rollicking documentary about what goes on when African-American women hit the salon.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Roth prefers sentimentality to subtlety and cutesiness to complexity. Fortunately, Molina balances Port's precocity, bringing a welcome gravitas to this simply told tale.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Feels more respectful than real.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In Hollywood, all is forgiven if you can deliver the goods. On-screen, at least, there’s little difference between this Gibson and the one we remember from earlier films like “Ransom” and “Payback.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The notable lack of chemistry between Cruz and Homar is a crucial absence in a film about all-consuming romance. And though each part is great fun to watch, the whole feels unfinished.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Surprisingly conventional by director Richard Linklater's standards, this pleasant, low-key dramedy is most memorable for the discovery of co-star Christian McKay.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This is, in its way, a horror movie -- not least because it will burrow into your own brain, as a reminder of all the ways the modern world is making you crazy, too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though it feels at first like a musty edition of "Masterpiece Theatre," Michael Hoffman's adaptation of a novel by Jay Parini holds enough surprises to make a memorable impact.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If someone else had made "My Son," it would be just another crime thriller based on a true story. But with Werner Herzog behind the camera, it's a head-scratcher from start to finish.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The magic simply isn't there.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There's little difference between the first and second movies -- both written by Besson -- so the perfunctory story line will feel familiar to fans. But the action, and the head-spinning stunts of those agile lead actors, will never get old.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You don't even have to be familiar with the first book in Rick Riordan's popular fantasy series to enjoy Chris Columbus' energetic adaptation.

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