Elizabeth Weitzman

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For 2,267 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Pirogue
Lowest review score: 0 Vice
Score distribution:
2267 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Peake provides the solid center for a movie that would otherwise melt into indie formula. The quirky supporting characters, slow pacing and predictable plotting intermittently threaten to overwhelm such a modest story. But then Ted secretly turns his camera back toward Vanetia and, like him, we’re smitten again.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The subject matter calls for ruthless observation, but his candy-colored pop vision has more in common with “Glee” than, say, “Heathers.” He’s aiming for a stinging WTF, but winds up with a fairly mild LOL.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Director Jillian Schlesinger’s documentary does a terrific job countering everyone’s assumptions. Maidentrip is a clear-eyed chronicle of Dekker’s record-breaking voyage. Think “All Is Lost,” but real, and with a teenage girl instead of Robert Redford (plus a very different ending).
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Story and his four screenwriters don’t exactly strain themselves to find a new angle in this mismatched buddy comedy. Picture “Rush Hour,” and then imagine Hart as the annoying kid in “Are We There Yet?” You’ve basically just watched the entire movie in your head.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    On the bright side, the charismatic Liberato is one to watch. And de Matteo (“The Sopranos”) brings a crucial jolt of assertive energy. Both seem to be in another, more exciting movie entirely.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The most startling truth is about Emanuel is that she's a rather ordinary teen in a rather ordinary movie.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 0 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A few barely conceived scenes allow Carl Reiner, Tom Arnold and Jay Mohr to show up for a quick paycheck. What’s that title again?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Peter Berg’s ultra-bloody battle film “Lone Survivor” is ultimately more grueling than satisfying. It’s more carnage than cinema.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you embrace the overkill, you’ll enjoy it. But if extravagance isn’t your thing, move swiftly on to something lighter and more digestible.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Directed tastefully by Ralph Fiennes, The Invisible Woman is very lovely to look at. But it lives up to its own title too well.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A director who really wanted to honor these actors’ legendary roles, rather than simply use them as a marketing hook, might have found a way to make this concept palatable. Segal (“Get Smart”) is not that director.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The Past is not as nuanced as its predecessor — and not as impactful, either. But this is still far more complex than most family dramas.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Both leading actors are teenagers who’ve never acted before — and they are both phenomenal.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Her
    Will you relate more to the bitter, or embrace the sweet? The choice itself is Jonze’s ultimate gift to us: an invitation to leave his film ready to communicate, debate and, most crucially of all, connect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most of the movie elicits tense empathy, which builds to a genuinely nerve-wracking sense of dread.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you’re only a casual observer of Bergman, you’ll find this documentary as inaccessible as his densest works.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What’s most surprising is that this talky dramedy was a massive smash at home in France, outearning blockbusters like “The Avengers.”
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Holwerda’s film never bothers to conceal its fawning view of Dawkins and Krauss — or challenge their dogma. And there’s no need for empty celebrity cameos from fans like Cameron Diaz (“Knowledge is power,” she reveals).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The cast, including Orlando Bloom and Evangeline Lilly as warrior elves, is also excellent (though we don’t get even a glimpse of Andy Serkis’ Gollum). And individually, each escapade does hold its own thrills.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Elizabeth Weitzman
    An evocative vision of self-destruction, a gorgeously crafted time capsule, and a fantastic showcase for Oscar Isaac in the title role.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    On the bright side, Robinson’s unlucky astronauts are played by Liev Schreiber, Elias Koteas, Olivia Williams and Romola Garai. All of these actors approach their potential demise with impressive conviction.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Despite the revved-up start and a suitably dusty setting, the movie stalls almost immediately. The story is uninspired, Lyons looks lost, and Booth makes for a bland femme fatale. Clarke tries to inject some energy into the action, but even he seems to realize this ride’s going nowhere.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What’s crucially missing, however, is a hissable villain. Nor are there any memorable tunes, which is too bad given that Broadway star Menzel is playing Elsa.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie doesn’t weave religion into the familiar structure of a comedy or melodrama. Instead, everything works in service to the sermon at the core. For most audience members, that will either be the primary draw or an inescapable drawback.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie wouldn’t stand for much of anything without such an effective team to represent the equivocating.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Looking for something unusual to see this weekend? Try this cool time capsule, which premiered in 1972 and then disappeared for decades.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Why does the movie waste so much time on empty adoration from celebrity fans and skim past the significant tragedies that contributed to her complex life? Parental neglect, sexual assault, severe mental illness — all of these factors shaped the woman Page became. But perhaps even today, no one wants to consider the sadness behind her 1,000-watt smile.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most important, he’s got Vaughn, whose mix of silliness and sincerity is an ideal anchor for the broad premise. Vaughn is one of those actors who tends to autopilot his way through too many mediocre projects. When he goes all in, though, it’s impossible to resist his charm.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We could have lived without another ’90s-influenced exercise in gritty wonderment. But thanks to a perfectly-matched lead, Shia LaBeouf, the movie makes enough impact to justify its existence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie ends with a setup for another sequel, which will undoubtedly be embraced by fans. Let’s just hope we don’t have to wait another 14 years to see it.

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