Elizabeth Weitzman

Select another critic »
For 2,271 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Being John Malkovich
Lowest review score: 0 I Will Follow You Into the Dark
Score distribution:
2271 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The spirit of the series remains true: cheerfully random jokes, blink-and-you’ll-miss-them references and, above all, a silly, stubbornly sentimental streak that only the crabbiest cynic could dismiss.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Cage, adopting an accent that could best be defined as Just British Enough to Sound Serious, adds some welcome weirdness to this otherwise generic production. He doesn’t fit in at all, but then again, who’d want him to?
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    True, the Boys are thoughtful and eloquent, and the whole package is engaging enough to hold even a newcomer’s attention, but the end result is an incomplete story of a forgotten band hoping to celebrate — or should I say sell-abrate — an anniversary no one else remembered.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Statham brings so little energy that the fight scenes are hardly more vivid than the gambling ones. His one-liners have no heart; his cynicism is no longer sharp.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 0 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Johnny Depp has done so much for us. Let us now return the favor and pretend Mortdecai, a disastrously misjudged career low, never existed.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Without Ewan McGregor in the lead, this flashy but aggressively superficial Aussie thriller would likely disappear without a trace.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    With all the talent on tap — including screenwriter Buck Henry, who worked with Michal Zebede to adapt Philip Roth’s 2009 novel — you’d think we’d get something better than this outdated indulgence.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For her debut drama, Song One, filmmaker Kate Barker-Froyland snares Anne Hathaway. It’s a stroke of luck. Hathaway’s doe-eyed sincerity provides just enough weight to keep this sweet but slight romance from floating away.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The danger in writing, directing, producing and casting yourself in the same movie is that there’s no one to pull you back from the cliff. Simon Helberg (“The Big Bang Theory”) did co-direct this grating vanity affair with his wife, Jocelyn Towne, but neither seems to realize how misguided it is at every step.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The title may suggest acts of indecency, but if there’s anything this mild dramedy could use, it’s a little more raciness.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 0 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Here’s hoping Bruce Willis bought something special with whatever cash he earned from this pointless, brutally ugly rehash of 1973’s “Westworld.”
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    These are the best moments, when Stewart and a wisely understated Gugino are free to enact their own wistful, beautifully intuitive pas de deux.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Cute, mostly well-mannered and just a bit off-center.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A palpable sense of environment and strong performances from Noah Wyle and musician Steve Earle can’t balance the extensive flaws in this unconvincing Appalachian melodrama.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The best movies are ever-shifting, intelligent and open-hearted enough to expand alongside an audience. American Sniper, Clint Eastwood’s harrowing meditation on war, is built on this foundation of uncommon compassion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Understatement is one of Mark Wahlberg’s greatest assets. But that admirable trait winds up working against him in The Gambler, Rupert Wyatt’s otherwise intriguing dramatic thriller.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Burton structures the film, right up to the fascinating finale, as both a damning tale of male privilege and a moving story of a woman’s liberation. The actors reflect these themes accordingly. Adams is touchingly restrained and Waltz is monstrously charismatic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Loyal fans of the Sondheim original may feel a bit let down themselves. There’s much to love here. But working with original “Woods” writer and Sondheim collaborator James Lapine, Marshall tones down the crucial dark shading in some places and has trouble with pacing in others.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A heartfelt, bittersweet and often amusing portrait of early middle-age.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Spall is best known for his supporting performances (Winston Churchill in “The King’s Speech,” Peter Pettigrew in the “Harry Potter” films). But he’s among the highest class of character actor, able to make a role of any size his own. Leigh has given Spall the gift of a lifetime in J.M.W. Turner.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For all the talent involved, the overall effect is surprisingly flat. Foxx appears disconnected, Byrne is wasted and a painfully hammy Diaz seems to be in another movie altogether.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The heart of the film is the touching relationship between two lonely souls. The lovely, feisty chemistry between Rowlands and Jackson will keep even the most cynical viewers on their toes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    They’ve turned Thomas Pynchon’s work into a slapstick noir homage that doesn’t just reward but demands multiple viewings.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Surely an Oscar-nominated filmmaker like Atom Egoyan (“The Sweet Hereafter”) can do better than this nasty and unconvincing thriller.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Shallow and frustratingly misguided drama.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It's no surprise that first-time director Scott Cohen is a nature photographer by trade: he's made one of the most gorgeous movies you'll see this year.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sam Esmail’s fractured romance is beautifully shot and creatively structured, but he never gives us a single reason to root for his mismatched couple.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Hampered by both an unimaginative script and ordinary direction, but it’s a serious Oscar contender. Why? Because Julianne Moore is in the lead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You may admire Witherspoon’s solid performance, but you won’t forget you’re watching a star.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This seemingly ordinary biographical documentary about the retiring animation master unfolds, at a deceptively gentle pace, into a work of immense beauty.

Top Trailers