Elizabeth Weitzman

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For 2,273 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Hugo
Lowest review score: 0 I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell
Score distribution:
2273 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Looking for something unusual to see this weekend? Try this cool time capsule, which premiered in 1972 and then disappeared for decades.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Why does the movie waste so much time on empty adoration from celebrity fans and skim past the significant tragedies that contributed to her complex life? Parental neglect, sexual assault, severe mental illness — all of these factors shaped the woman Page became. But perhaps even today, no one wants to consider the sadness behind her 1,000-watt smile.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Most important, he’s got Vaughn, whose mix of silliness and sincerity is an ideal anchor for the broad premise. Vaughn is one of those actors who tends to autopilot his way through too many mediocre projects. When he goes all in, though, it’s impossible to resist his charm.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We could have lived without another ’90s-influenced exercise in gritty wonderment. But thanks to a perfectly-matched lead, Shia LaBeouf, the movie makes enough impact to justify its existence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie ends with a setup for another sequel, which will undoubtedly be embraced by fans. Let’s just hope we don’t have to wait another 14 years to see it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The deeply private, intensely ideological and undeniably brilliant Watterson would make an absolutely fascinating subject. But director Joel Allen Schroeder has no access to him. So instead he talks a lot about how much he loves “Calvin and Hobbes” and then invites other fans to do the same.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Sorrentino’s dazzling tribute to Roman indulgence is a bittersweet, slightly surreal epic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s Ross, however, who really makes a lasting impact. Someone should snap her up for a series — and soon.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There’s so much more to this story — as any number of articles about the people he wronged attest — but this time, Gibney never really gets in gear.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie’s strong sense of empathy, enhanced by several noteworthy performances, ought to engage most viewers.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Children, of course, won’t notice the political subtext. But do be prepared for them to exit the theater demanding that you make only Tofurkey in the future.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    But with Kerouac declaring that “the only thing that matters is the conceptions in my own mind,” we’re still left waiting for the filmmaker who can take us there.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Not much happens in Sandra Nettelbeck’s intimate family drama, but its well-drawn connections between lonely souls make an impact nonetheless.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    You certainly won’t learn anything of interest about the Princess of Wales in Oliver Hirschbiegel’s misguided new biopic. But Diana can be declared a success in one regard — its vacant inanity serves to remind us of the perpetual indignities forced upon this unlucky Lady.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What makes the calculated sentimentality palatable is Curtis’ intelligent assurance as he guides us through each step. It’s a gooey indulgence, to be sure, but one that will please anybody with a cinematic sweet tooth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Given that his subjects are so inspiring, surely Levy could have spiced up his storytelling with a bit more creativity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The historically essential document they’ve created here pulses with an immediacy that will leave you simultaneously enlightened and stunned.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Overlong and dramatically thin.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What a letdown it is to see this spellbinding, era-defining story tamed into such stodgy submission.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As for Ginsberg himself: Should we be more impressed that Radcliffe so confidently portrays an actual icon, or that he banishes all memories of the fictional one he’s portrayed before? Both accomplishments suggest that he’s got real talent, and a future that’s already taking him well past Harry Potter.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Redford will surely earn a well-deserved Oscar nomination for this role, to which he commits with unerring dedication. But the real star is writer/director Chandor, whose painstaking approach is exquisite in its spare integrity.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Shabby on the surface and indulgent at its core.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There is no reason a film with an agenda can’t also be engaging or thought-provoking. But what we have here is not so much a movie as a blunt Sunday sermon.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Moore shows promising ingenuity in shooting parts of the movie covertly, within the notoriously restrictive Disney World resort. But his script never takes the same sort of risk.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    This version is never rough, nor rude, nor boisterous, but for first-timers, perhaps wisely and slow is the way to go. There will be time enough for them to discover cinema’s superior adaptations anon.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 0 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Rare is the film so ineptly made that it barely deserves the dignity of a review. Which, on the one hand, makes this slapdash horror romance somewhat unusual. On the other, however, you’re wasting valuable time just reading about it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie can’t help feeling like a vanity affair — a shot of novocaine, instead of a letter bomb.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Alas, the split-screen compositions, slow-motion effects, pensive closeups and prosthetic teeth can’t distract from what’s missing: Faulkner’s pointed but deeply buried observations of the human condition.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Giamatti and Rudd banter with appeal, but Melissa James Gibson’s lackluster script doesn’t offer either much to work with.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Perhaps it’s inevitable that the movie works best not while we’re watching fictional recreations, but when we see real footage or hear actual broadcasts.

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