For 943 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ella Taylor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Lost in Translation
Lowest review score: 0 Burzynski
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 66 out of 943
943 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ella Taylor
    It's a sweet-tempered folly in which all's well that ends well.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Ella Taylor
    Judged by the ideological terms on which it was founded, you could say the kibbutz experiment has failed. I, for one, could never have made a permanent home there. Yet the sense of community was real, and those cavernous dining halls supply some of the happiest memories of my youth.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Ella Taylor
    The movie uses the mutt's disappearance as a frame on which to hang a well-worn package of fatally mild domestic disorder, then resolve it in what feels like real time. Let's just say that the dog gets the best lines.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 65 Ella Taylor
    The accomplished actress Michelle Yeoh, who brought the project to Besson, is a regal beauty who brings off an uncanny resemblance to Suu Kyi largely through posture and the trademark flowers the activist wore in her hair.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Ella Taylor
    Nobody's idea of "Mr. Holland's Opus," but it winds up in a similar place, more or less.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Ella Taylor
    The crisply sweet banter and the halting intimacy that grows between two shy people with a common goal more than makes up for a wildly implausible plot.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 95 Ella Taylor
    If you pay close attention, there's also an exhilarating evocation of how art is stubbornly made, and arbitrary authority put in its place, under the most confining conditions. Rene Magritte, whose famous pipe painting is slyly honored in the movie's title, would be jazzed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 85 Ella Taylor
    The hipster moment may have faded fast through repression and attrition, but in Todorovsky's reading, it was crucially formative on today's Russian youth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 65 Ella Taylor
    In most respects, On the Ice is the kind of straight-ahead, underprivileged-teen drama beloved of Sundance audiences.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Ella Taylor
    The elephant in the room of any discussion of Poland and the Jews is that country's less-than-glorious record of betrayal and collaboration with the Nazis. Holland, who is half-Jewish and whose mother was active in the Polish Resistance, doesn't shrink from that legacy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ella Taylor
    Big Miracle is a family movie fitted with the usual appeals to multiple audiences, and though tots, teens and younger parents might find the action a little slow until the rescue pressure builds, the grandparents will enjoy it as a trip down media memory lane.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Ella Taylor
    Though it's certainly moving, it suffers from a frantically overproduced desperation to hold what the filmmakers seem to fear will be our wavering attention.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Ella Taylor
    Long on hero worship and woefully short on insight, Lula: Son of Brazil oozes good intentions, but it wouldn't look out of place in a retrospective of early Soviet workerist cinema.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Ella Taylor
    I'm pretty sure that the terrific British actress Janet McTeer never meant to act Close out of every frame they share, but she surely does as Hubert, a cheerful bruiser who brings his own secrets to the party, as well as a monumentally fake broken nose, a kind heart and a practical gift for converting adversity to advantage.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Ella Taylor
    The movie is anything but combative. Pariah is a tender, sporadically goofy, yet candid examination of emergent identity, a film whose lack of attitude sets it apart from much of the hard-bitten, thug-life storytelling that's dominated African-American cinema for decades.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 95 Ella Taylor
    The screenplay, by Peter Straughan and his late wife, Bridget O'Connor, is debonair. Alfredson's mastery of tone and ambiance is flawless. The bloodletting is brief and necessarily appalling, the comedy mordant: I guarantee you will never sing along to "Mr. Woo" in quite the same way again.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Ella Taylor
    Tuschi has made a docu-thriller of enormous narrative flair and visual smarts. It's a perfect fit for the blend of Greek tragedy, spaghetti Western and judicial farce that defines business and politics in the New Russia.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 85 Ella Taylor
    Never one to take a back seat in his movies, Broomfield projects a shambling, Columbo-style bonhomie that gains him access to people who should be very afraid of letting him cross their threshold.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 61 Ella Taylor
    The movie drowns the deeper questions it raises in a sadistic procedural, an endless circular motion of fight scenes whose only justification is themselves.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Ella Taylor
    His sorry tale is worth re-telling, if only to piece together the connective tissue between government, big business and, to a lesser degree, the media institutions that propped up what most insiders knew or suspected was a massive fraud for years before Madoff got his comeuppance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Ella Taylor
    One Day ends up fatally compromised by its glib recourse to death and cancer as moral wake-up calls.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 65 Ella Taylor
    Big hair, fine period frocks and interior design lend The Help a pleasingly retro look. Yet for someone who grew up in Mississippi, the director has little sense of place.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Ella Taylor
    More than anything, though, Another Earth is an impressive calling card for Brit Marling, who wrote and produced the movie with Cahill, a classmate from Georgetown University. Marling also steals the movie as Rhoda Williams.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ella Taylor
    The script groans beneath a mass of symbolic winking and declamatory exposition that has the unfortunate effect of turning the villagers into credulous simpletons, ready to blow with any wind that carries them.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 85 Ella Taylor
    Nim's suffering is heartbreaking, but Marsh's melodramatic style, with its re-enactments and intense score, sometimes feels bombastic and overblown for a group of people who, aside from the frighteningly detached and morally careless Terrace, seem to be garden-variety neurotics and narcissists, more clueless than willfully cruel.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ella Taylor
    But lo! Isn't that Owen Wilson, blond and goyische to the gills, yet faithfully replicating the put-upon slump of the Allen shoulders, the quavering stammers about art vs. success, literature vs. Hollywood?
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Ella Taylor
    And at its loony best, Wiig and Mumolo's script hurls a torrent of bridesmaid-zilla set pieces at us, playing out like a "Sex and the City 3" read-through gone deliciously awry.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Ella Taylor
    The Beaver is at its core a classically Oedipal tale. While one son angles in all the wrong ways for his abject father's attention, another engages in a heroic struggle with his abusive bully of a dad.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Ella Taylor
    A good-hearted, perfectly watchable bonbon.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 85 Ella Taylor
    It's fair to say that men in general and ardent Catholics in particular don't come off well. Yet even they are humanized by the movie's merciful temper, and by a cast of damaged ancillary characters wearing eccentric goodwill on their sleeves.

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