For 579 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 78% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 17.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Eric Kohn's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 77
Highest review score: 100 Leviathan
Lowest review score: 25 Lovelace
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 579
579 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Suleiman's most poignant moments are largely wordless. Nothing feels more affecting than Suleiman's ubiquitous frozen stare. Although he never utters a sound, his silence speaks volumes about the inability to resolve the social ramifications of Middle Eastern strife.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Although Madsen's survey of warning strategies has an aimless structure prone to repetition, he creates an effective mood that transcends his time-travel gimmick and eventually becomes topical.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    It may go without saying that Poetry adopts a lyrical tone, but this forms the crux of its appeal. In this case, the title says it all.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Never indulging in outright scare tactics or loose improvisation, the movie primarily works like an awkward narrative that plays with perspective.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Unable to express the sorrow of Cory's passing or the larger sense of detachment from the world it represents, most of the people in Putty Hill try to remain disaffected. By pestering them with questions, Porterfield gets under their skin - and, in the process, ours as well.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Representing lower-class violence taken to an extreme, the cannibalism cannot be contained by police work. The movie's gradual build to a thrilling, appropriately bloody climax intensifies this disconnect.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Ignore the precise religious context and it stands perfectly well as a restrained look at personal convictions in the face of certain death.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    A comedy of remarriage buried in intellectual abstraction and cinephilic obsessions, Certified Copy wanders a bit but never loses focus, with the only certainty being that its gimmick is genuine.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Showcases Jones' ability to provide ample entertainment value with sharply drawn characters in a minimalist setting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Frammartino keeps the material engaging simply by aiming the camera at his subjects and letting the material organically emerge-rather than enforcing the supernatural element with overstatement.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    The visual collage retains a consistent melancholy, resulting in an experience that's both deeply affecting and-since José never actually appears on-camera-utterly detached.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Potiche successfully satirizes the gender politics at its core. At the same time, it knowingly mocks the obsession over debates about the suppression of women that pervaded the culture during the movie's setting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Greene's patient, understated portrait renders a universal rite of passage in strangely alluring, poetic terms.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    To Die Like a Man deserves your attention for showcasing a filmmaker with the capacity for bold narrative trickery that doesn't come at the expense of emotional investment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    The first-time director's refreshingly credible portrait of a boho character with Middle Eastern origins rectifies the aforementioned canonical gap in a witty, naturalistic generational snapshot.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Herzog naturally plays up the enigma at hand with epic grandeur, occasionally overdoing it but usually hitting the mark.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    More meditation than movie, Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life is bound to mystify, awe and exasperate in equal measures.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Film Socialism is a weighty, intentionally cryptic product that's easy on the eyes and heavy on the mind.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Mills fashions the set-up for an overwrought, thoroughly depressing character study into an oddly charming comedy. It's a midlife crisis gently portrayed with sympathy rather than grief.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Jacobs, working from a script by Patrick de Witt, takes a conventional coming-of-age story and does it proud, enlivening the plot with an almost experimental portrait of alienation and despair.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    By favoring mood over plot, "Myth" explores what it feels like to transition into youth adulthood and face harsher truths.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Steve James's The Interrupters runs long, but earns its heft.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Weekend builds into a powerful encapsulation of an identity crisis over the course of three passionate days.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    With its bouncy soundtrack, deadpan humor and good-natured disposition, Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki's Le Havre is an endearing affair.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Like "Afterschool," Durkin's first feature explores the dangerous extremes of youth vulnerability.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    The measured vérité style of Frederick Wiseman meets the visual polish of Terrence Malick in Dragonslayer, a fascinating slice of crude Americana from first-time director Tristan Patterson. However, it stands alone with an infectious hard rock attitude.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    The Descendants constantly hovers on the brink of a dark comedy. But it never takes the big plug. By treading carefully, Payne has created his warmest, most earnest work, if not his best.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Rampart is co-written by crime writer James Ellroy as a messy, disorienting noir, and shot by cinematographer Bobby Bukowski with an unsettling degree of realism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    In the movie's final shot, Jung's confidence crumbles and he looks supremely troubled, still uncertain of a world he once believed could be explained with textual prowess. Better than any analysis, his expression sums up the dangerous method at the heart of every Cronenberg movie.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    I had to see the new version twice to realize that there's so much to appreciate about this multilayered production.

Top Trailers