For 100 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Erik Adams' Scores

Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Toy Story That Time Forgot
Lowest review score: 25 Man With a Plan: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 67 out of 100
  2. Negative: 3 out of 100
100 tv reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Erik Adams
    Toy Story That Time Forgot attests to the strengths of this fictional universe by relying on its deep bench of supporting players.... Schaal’s capacity for wonder enlivens a plot that harkens back to the first Toy Story.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Erik Adams
    Beyond reference points and sermons for the converted, With Bob And David is a hilarious triumph on its own merits.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Broad City presents a recognizable, recognizably hilarious perspective on what trying-but-failing looks like from the inside.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    [The] TV adaptation ... continues to surprise three years into its run. ... Unlike most shows that reach for the “reset” button, Hannibal wasn’t in a position where it needed a new beginning. It’s just the logical, natural place to go, and the fresh slate makes startling hay from the unknowns.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    The Leftovers staff digs at complex emotions with surgical precision and intimate storytelling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    The Knick rides the beautifully brutal, brutally beautiful nexus of 2014’s televised finest--Hannibal, True Detective, and The Leftovers all leap to mind--set aside by moments of true hope.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Amid the precision-tooled dick jokes and the airtight comedies of errors, Silicon Valley cuts the compelling tale of a creator forging his own path through a frontier where every other maverick is a charlatan--or worse.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Fitting for a star whose improvised podcast appearances frequently turn down dark alleyways, Review really gets going when it digs deep into horrible behavior.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    The show’s premise has so much potential for musing and puzzling that it’s a relief it remembers to be funny, too.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Love communicates the honesty its creators strived for, if only for the believable way it draws Gus and Mickey together across time, space, and their own insecurities. Put in the time with Love, and that time will be rewarded.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    Brooklyn Nine-Nine is a tight, funny pilot where the energy of the cast salvages the few down moments. Still, it lays some possible traps for the rest of the series, not the least of which is the ever-present temptation of cop-show cliché.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    The Mick prizes laughter above all—the petty sniping between kids and adults inspiring chuckles, the more elaborate and destructive set pieces going for gasps and belly laughs. When a sitcom knows its voice and sense of humor this early, growth and development can come along later.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    Although the early chapters aren’t rip-roaring laugh riots, that only means the funny stuff--Jamie’s mother doing some zero-hour remodeling; Rhonda displaying her lack of criminal bona fides mid-looting--leaves a deeper impact.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    The series is at its most potent when it reframes the everyday in the context of the Cold War, like Philip comparing notes on home life with a Mossad operative or Elizabeth displaying a flash of vulnerability in front of a government-contracted dupe. (And then betraying that parental bond by turning it into a threat.) Other aspects of the show would do well to find this middle ground; they’re getting there in season two.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    The show is funny, but never gut-bustingly so; it’s most often a triumph of atmosphere, a hangout show with a tremendous (and too infrequently engaged) sense of tension.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    It can hit (Odenkirk, the best curser in the biz, swearing his way through a procedure) and miss (the ending of “Hole” is a bit soft) in equal measure. Either way, it’s exciting to watch Heidecker and Wareheim stretch their legs like this.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    Justified has always been a show about defining yourself, for yourself. So long as it keeps finding fresh criminal conspiracies to wrap around that core--as season five appears to have done--the show will remain a must-watch.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    Life In Pieces’ greatest asset could become its greatest liability, as the series wolfs down potential stories four at a time. But if they’re as funny, well acted, and snappy as the stories in the premiere episode, it’ll be worth it to watch whatever stories Life In Pieces gets to tell.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    The Grinder is a very good pilot that suggests six or seven different directions for the show that follows--not all of them as sharp or as funny as the first episode.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    Despite his delivery route’s familiarity, The Guy still has plenty of tricks in his bag.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    To endure as a TV series, Westworld will need to bridge the gap between its fascinating ideas and the blank canvases they’re projected upon. Fortunately, it’s not so lost in its thoughts to forget that a robot-cowboy show ought to have the occasional shootout, heist, or daring escape. And while it’s never as plainly satirical as the original film, it still exhibits a sense of humor.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    There are portions of the 10-episode first season that are darker than any other American broadcast-network comedy, but not shying away from the inherent gravity of Bruce and Emma’s situation provides a rich shading to the stranger-in-a-strange-land laughs.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    There’s enough depth and complication in the performances alone to buoy the six-episode run, and given the intensity of the criminal specifics, the slow burn feels more like a feature than a bug.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    If Last Week Tonight With John Oliver can keep shedding humorous light on international affairs and other stories that fall through the cable-news cracks, this show might make it to eight weeks and beyond.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    While not quite reaching the heights of the show’s first season, Transparent manages to deliver something a little more fully formed and contained in season three.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    [The premiere] rarely takes the expected route, a heartening sight from a show entering its syndication years.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    The Case of the Starlet and Her Incendiary Disc is another sign that Archer isn’t losing any ambition with age. Reed and crew made the most of their relaxed production schedule, crafting a picture-postcard L.A. while giving the Figgis offices that “second floor of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce” sheen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Reproduction isn’t The Spoils Of Babylon’s comic strong suit, absurdity is. Crummy special effects are cute, but the miniseries finds its voice by bursting Jonrosh’s bubble, illuminating his shortcomings as a filmmaker through mealy mouthed dialogue, incomprehensible blocking, and continuity errors.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The increased episode count of season three allows Black Mirror to show off its full range of tricks, but it’s the episodes that make a play for resonance—“San Junipero,” “Nosedive,” and “Men Against Fire”--that stand out. ... But even with these advanced features, Black Mirror remains subject to the hit-or-miss vagaries of the anthology format.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Sometimes you just have to go with American Horror Story, even if it hurts your soul to be entertained by such heedless provocation.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    At best, it reminds sitcom fans that quality work is still being done in multi-camera; at worst, it’s a decent distraction during the hiatus for Heelan’s other show, the final link to a comic dynasty that wasn’t meant to be.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    It’s an episode of television that exists at the intersection of Marvel’s superpowers-as-puberty metaphors and the half-baked cultural upheaval of True Blood—with a Whedon-esque anti-authoritarian streak thrown in for good measure. The show could devolve into a grab bag of familiar themes and tropes down the line, but its pilot does a remarkable job of synthesizing a cohesive introduction out of those disparate parts.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The rapid-fire patter gets more room to breathe, all the better for cheeky asides or pointed repetitions. That’s good news for those who come for the witty repartee, and bad news for the Luke Daneses in the audience who dread set-pieces featuring elaborate festivals or Stars Hollow town meetings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Romance greases the gears on a show like this, but Grandfathered is always more interesting when it’s the premiere of a show about people navigating the unique little family unit they accidentally made.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Built on a blockbuster framework, Years Of Living Dangerously comes off more like a word-of-mouth sleeper, a documentary that’ll drop science on people drawn in by the promise of Harrison Ford berating a foreign minister like he’s a Russian terrorist who’s not welcome on Air Force One.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The Young Pope keeps its audience at a distance, but it also keeps that audience guessing. And not just about the next curveball it’s going to throw or abrupt left turn Lenny’s going to take, but about the fundamental mysteries of faith.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Riverdale spins the basics of the subgenre into pop-art cotton candy--with all the stickiness, instant gratification, and substance that implies.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    There’s smart plotting at work, and keen observational skills when it comes to showing who’s truly in power, but it takes a squishy stance on the issues at hand, a “nuclear warfare bad” perspective that makes for agreeable comedy but ineffectual satire.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    These episodes are not their finest half-hours, but they’re laying a foundation for greater things to come.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Narratively and emotionally rushed, at least Buddy’s Musical Christmas smartly emphasizes its animated nature, through visual inventiveness and top-flight voice talent.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    One Mississippi has its flaws, but it goes further than any of Notaro’s previous work to show what it’s like to be that person.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The truth lies somewhere in between, in the ineffable elements that Red Oaks absolutely nails. The show takes place in a world where lives are as planned out as a country club’s summer itinerary, but it’s smart enough to see through that illusion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    It’s easy to forget that A Series Of Unfortunate Events is family entertainment. It treats mature themes like grief, loss, and disappointment with sardonic honesty, but that’s a world-weariness beyond the show’s reading level.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    All Or Nothing At All is imperfect, but it makes a riveting effort at capturing its subject’s complex and complicated personality.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Such easy chemistry early on is a positive sign for the show’s future, as is the approach of the supporting cast, which gamely attacks the small amount of material it’s given in the pilot.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The hits-to-miss ratio is weighted in Angie Tribeca’s favor, thanks in large part to the cast’s go-for-broke energy and a roster of guests--including Bill Murray, Keegan-Michael Key, and Kerri Kenney-Silver--tuned into the show’s looney wavelength.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Creature Shop Challenge is about doing the most in the least amount of time, and while there’s some impressive work on display in the premiere, the impulse to keep watching comes from the sense that the best, most stunning creatures are yet to come.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Based on the pilot (and Next Time On Lonny), Anfanger and Schimpf have surprise down--now they just have to string their surprises together.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Once it moves out of Walt’s long shadow, the origin story of Odenkirk’s slickster attorney reveals itself as a rollicking caper that’s more Rockford than Heisenberg.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Cristela tries so hard and achieves so much--some potent jabs at broken-down American racial politics; portraying a family whose insults don’t undermine the genuine affection on-screen--that misfires are inevitable. But like the woman at its center, the show gets a long way on sheer effort.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Like the supporting casts in early seasons of The Office and Parks And Recreation, secondary players in Ozzie’s story make the most of their time in the spotlight—particularly Ana Gasteyer as the disgraced therapist at the head of Starcrossed, and Brian Huskey as a self-proclaimed business mogul who’s convinced that Reptilians have made off with his wife.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Replicating the beats of that previous show isn’t as important to Girl Meets World’s potential for success as reviving the spirit of its inspiration. It’s there in measured doses in the pilot, bolstering the broader jokes, staged performances from child actors, and requisite feints toward classroom puppy love.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Between the broadcast excerpts and play-by-play commentary, Ferrell Takes The Field conveys the excitement of pulling off this massive stunt, a gee-whiz sincerity that comes through even when the star is acting like the helicopter parked in center field is part of a day’s work for a major leaguer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The difference between Quantico and other new dramas is that Quantico totes its bullshit with a sense of wit and style.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The early goings of Hello Ladies are more amusing than they are funny.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The knock-down, pop-up rhythms of Crashing can grow wearying when the only character we’re following is the one going through them. But they also make the few moments of triumph so, so satisfying.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    Think of Battle Creek not as Milt’s tricked out FBI SUV or Russ’ dying compact, but as the car Gilligan once gave Walter White: Reliable, kind of dorky and a little bit funky, Battle Creek is the Pontiac Aztek of cop shows.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    TripTank shares one characteristic with its spiritual predecessors: Like Spike And Mike’s and Liquid Television, most of the segments will eventually fade into hazy memory.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    Klondike isn’t half as good a televised novel as it is a parade of landscape photography punctuated by archetypal Western exploits.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    When its cast is interacting as characters, and not boogeymen born on the op-ed page, The Great Indoors is worth subscribing to.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    When everyone gets a fair chance to play, Mulaney finds its right type of weird. The ingredients are here for a show that’s more than a showbiz satire or a four-friends-and-a-couch comedy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    On their own, Arthur’s lunkheaded Jimmy and Skye’s bubbly Sandy are sketched a little thin—but due to Working The Engels’ compact ensemble, they usually wind up paired with Rohl or Martin, salvaging some potentially dire storylines like “Jimmy gives grandma’s ring to a stripper” or “Sandy wants to win a mother-daughter dance contest.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    It might not be the type of thing you’ll want to feast on, but Santa Clarita Diet is good for a little snack here or there.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    A better version of the show peeks out whenever the plot relents and the characters are allowed to let fly with a knowingly groan-worthy play on words, a throwaway non sequitur, or any other hallmark of the Jim Henson school of humor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    The commercials are funny, but they also have the effect of reducing a charismatic cast to little more than the grinning faces next to dubious deals like trick-or-treating knockoffs and Halloween merchandise repurposed for Thanksgiving.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    Betas’ aspirational spirit can be invigorating, but it’s yet to find a unique perspective on the setting that was the winningest part of its pilot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    Despite his novelty, Zorn remains the same kind of unduly confident doofus that has dominated screen comedy for a decade and a half. Though Sudeikis’ performance brings a lot of life to the character, Zorn doesn’t have much going for him that isn’t rooted in premise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Erik Adams
    It was a cautious first show.... A stand-up who threads laughs throughout winding, anecdotal routines, he’s still adjusting to The Daily Show’s rhythms.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    While Superheroes is forced to cram seven decades of a multimedia phenomenon into three hours of airtime, at least it does so while taking its subject matter seriously. At times a little too seriously.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    It’s painfully funny at times, and occasionally poignant. In between those peaks, however, it’s needlingly formless.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    As the miniseries tells it, the tools necessary for settling Mars will need to be multipurpose: rocket boosters that can be deployed for multiple launches, interchangeable circuitry for mid-mission emergencies. Unfortunately, Mars itself isn’t as versatile.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Frequency’s vintage equipment is missing its spark of life.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Like Hot In Cleveland, it’s throwback TV, with all the unfussy charms that implies. Some weak conceptual components aside, what it offers is the warm comfort of the familiar.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    There are moments in the pilot where a smarter, more closely observed Welcome To The Family peeks through.... The most unfortunate victim of Welcome To The Family’s pacing is the pilot’s sense of humor.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    An overabundance of ingredients hurts both Dracula and its Dracula, the latter of which is constructed from the discarded bits of characters within and without the public domain.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Even with its inventive setting and all-star cast, there’s not enough reason to stick with BoJack Horseman through the first six episodes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    The Real O’Neal has some jagged edges, but its overall tone isn’t dark enough to wring any humor out of teenage eating disorders.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Stan Against Evil isn’t quite there yet, and it’s early installments are still working out the finer points of its monster-of-the-week structure.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    There are things to enjoy about Roadies, like Wilson and Gugino’s bantering and a burgeoning running gag about Staton-House’s inability to hold on to an opening act. But the show can’t bring these elements into harmony with grating performances by Baker and Byers or the baffling Magical Native American characterization of the security chief played by Branscombe Richmond.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Sentiment- and story-wise, How Murray Saved Christmas is all over the place, but its joke-telling abilities live up to the shiniest lines on its creators’ resumes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    After respectively stealing scenes on a very good single-camera sitcom and a mediocre live-audience one, both actors [James Van Der Beek and Zoe Lister Jones] come ready to play in the ensemble setup, and that’ll be a huge factor in Friends With Better Lives’ ability to improve on a so-so pilot.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Artful edits and an expertly curated soundtrack class the joint up a bit, but when Woodley and Dern go toe-to-toe, the only thing preventing things from going full-on Dynasty is the lack of an adjacent fountain.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    Unlike the show’s trio of siblings, the audience isn’t psychic, so everyone’s explaining what’s on their minds at all times. It’s an easy mistake that a lot of speculative fiction makes, erring too far in the direction of bringing everyone up to speed.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    Some skillfully deployed, binge-enabling cliff-hangers notwithstanding, there’s not much here to differentiate Crisis In Six Scenes from any other late-period Allen trifle, slurped down in under 90 minutes and forgotten until the next round of cryptic casting announcements.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    Unfortunately for One Big Happy, the only early dates it can accurately hit are those of a bygone era, one whose fortunes NBC is unlikely to rediscover anytime soon.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    Segments like “Slide Show” and “A Bunch Of Jerks” (in which performers are attached to harnesses and yanked into the air whenever they break the rules of the game) bring some visual engagement to short-form improv. But the rest of the premiere throws up barriers to engagement, moving too quickly or too confusingly to make the viewer feel like they’re in on the roast McManus is emceeing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    Although Turkey Hollow’s long journey to the screen has rendered it into run-of-the-mill family fare, it earns a few points for genuine weirdness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    It’s the inverse of Adam McKay’s approach to The Big Short’s dense subject matter, in which meeting the players provides a deeper understanding of the game. Backgrounding the market keeps the characters of Billions at arm’s length.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    Whatever there is to enjoy about the show, it’s all surface level, and that surface is too choppy to be routinely entertaining.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    The episode has the propulsive pace of a CBS hour-long, but that can leave the fun parts of a single-camera sitcom (like the jokes) behind in its dust. Above all, The Crazy Ones is safe.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    In introducing the inner monologues, it’s as if creator Jeff Lowell and his team sought to maximize the show’s joke-telling space, but what they’re actually doing is restricting performance. Whenever the voice-over resurfaces, Tipton and/or McDorman are forced to pull faces or seek another form of silent expression. Shooting for the pilot must have looked like a high-price game of charades.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    So much of Emerald City reads like a paint-by-numbers grim-and-gritty update of The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz and its abundant sequels, it borders on self-parody. ... And yet Emerald City is too singularly bonkers, too gorgeously assembled, to dismiss out of hand.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    There’s still room for a modest comedy of this sort on CBS, but even in its limited ambitions, the premiere stumbles on undercooked dialogue and the garbled perspective of its protagonist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    Thanks to Fagerbakke and fellow supporting player Lance Lim—who provides Eli Baker’s awkward Henry with a smooth-operating sidekick—there’s a lot to laugh at on the fringes of Growing Up Fisher. If only the brood at the middle of this family comedy were as sharply defined.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    Alpha House hits a few notes of inspired satire--like the bowl of American flag lapel pins the senators keep on the kitchen counter--but Trudeau’s been more biting and much funnier elsewhere, past TV efforts like Tanner ’88 and the malaise-infected Doonesbury Special included.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    As it stands now, Power spends far more time telling the audience that everything is at stake for Ghost than showing how everything he holds dear is at stake.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    With its many moving parts never quite working in unison, Of Kings And Prophets plays the game of thrones and neither wins nor dies.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 33 Erik Adams
    Like the dullest of origin stories, it all seems pretty perfunctory, a series that longs to be a shaggy hangout show shoehorned into a rickety single-camera framework that may as well be called How I Left Your Mother.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Erik Adams
    The show places a tremendous amount of faith in LeBlanc, but in spite of the occasional flash of Joey Tribbiani panache, he’s always outshone by Snyder, Nealon, or the analogy-loving dialogue of husband-and-wife creators Jeff and Jackie Filgo.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 25 Erik Adams
    Truth Be Told dilutes the chemistry between Bell and Webb by forcing them to be best friends with Gosselaar and Lachey, who appear to be cast for looks first and comedic abilities second.... The gang’s wacky hijinks set up farcical convolutions, none of which can play out because these characters are always saying what’s on their mind.

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