For 140 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ernest Hardy's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Generation Iron
Lowest review score: 0 Welcome to the Jungle
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 83 out of 140
  2. Negative: 20 out of 140
140 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    Thanks to Lynch's expert pacing and modulation of narrative tension, even viewers who already know the outcome of the film's central incident will likely be pulled to the edges of their seats.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    This Ain't California is a masterful lie that illuminates a little-known reality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    A crash course in history, politics, and social science, Valentino's Ghost is both sobering and illuminating, and its execution is thrilling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    It's charming, gently humorous, and beautifully attuned to the interior lives of children.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    If Secret can leave the viewer despairing, it's also hugely inspiring, thanks to Mino. She's one of the cinematic heroines of the year.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    Yudin pulls lovely philosophical grace notes from his subjects as they illuminate some universal truths from their very specific world.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's a must-see for anyone interested in art.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    But real-life hard-knock plot twists, as well as some tweaking of form (there's no narrator or voiceover of any kind; the film's subjects outline their grim realities largely through their rhythmically upbeat songs) make the film absolutely riveting, as does the fiercely rousing music.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    At the film's center is Emily Watson's pitch-perfect performance as Margaret Humphreys, the real-life social worker who in 1986 stumbled over the hidden practice.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Cast with both professional and novice actors (which results in uneven performances), the beautifully shot film is filled with exquisite moments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    One marvel of the film is how it conveys so much information so quickly, and with such accessibility.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What saves the film—and grandly—is Nance’s wildly ambitious visual imagination. Teetering somewhere between film school precocity and impressively assured audaciousness...It’s almost hypnotic in its style and genre promiscuity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    The roles of affect and artifice in mediating the realities of racism, homophobia, and poverty are perhaps the true subjects of Shirley Clarke's landmark doc.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Old Dog has the look and feel of a documentary, which adds senses of urgency and immediacy to a tale that moves at a languid, but never boring, pace.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What makes Kuchu work as taut agitprop, and ultimately to devastating emotional effect, is that Wright and Zouhali-Worrall allow the enormity of the film's political concerns to be telegraphed through the stories, experiences, and astute analysis of ordinary queer folk and their hetero allies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's a smart, funny, tough-minded film crammed with data and personal anecdotes, each illuminating the other, each sketching in the staggering costs—and not just financial—of the ways authorities in this country have shaped the drug issue. It's far from glib.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Informant is riveting as it slowly assembles a damning profile of its subject. It's also timely.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    The film ends on up notes, but its strength is that it's not really a feel-good movie, instead shining a light on both how far we have come in terms of race in America and how very far we still have to go.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Without forcing the material into facile uplift, Bloodworth-Thomason still edges it into the realm of inspirational, never overplaying the anguish or soft-pedaling the bigotry at the heart of the story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Schwarz's juxtaposition of the human cost of the drug war alongside the glamorization of its henchmen and their brutality is sobering, even depressing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's utterly rousing watching the women master their instruments and then push past the birth pains of their new business enterprise, and it's completely wrenching as their individual backstories unfold.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Though Neshoba is standard-issue in terms of craftsmanship, the tools used to tell the tale (newsreels, family photos, crime scene and autopsy photos) are masterfully employed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Though the film, based on Dallaire's memoir, can veer toward deification of the general, it's hugely effective.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Undertow, is sublime. Set in a small, picturesque Peruvian fishing village, it's less a coming-out tale than a magic realism–infused coming-of-consciousness love story.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Circo is filled with beautiful images and haunting moments, especially in the third act, when the family unravels as the film culminates in a final triumphant, haunting image.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    The movie floats to another realm entirely when the cameras go into the home of Nova Venerable, a smart, eloquent, gorgeous girl whose love for her special-needs younger brother and their hardworking single mom is expressed in terms that sidestep the formulaic verbal and physical bombast of so many of her peers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Lean, fast-moving, and filled with game-changing fight sequences that have a brutally beautiful (or beautifully brutal) quality, Gareth Evans's Indonesian martial-arts film The Raid: Redemption lives up to its viral hype.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Marston nails the claustrophobia of small-town life and the turbulent emotionalism of teenagers, but what pushes the film toward sublimity is the way he delicately captures all of the characters' inner lives as their world slowly crumbles.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    It's the mind-blowing performance footage (and there's lots of it) that makes this a must-see film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Even those who closely follow African (or global) politics will likely be bowled over by the real-life plot twists unfolding before Merz's camera. What makes the film especially resonate now is the frustration with the status quo that is consistently voiced by the people on the street.