For 141 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ernest Hardy's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Free Angela & All Political Prisoners
Lowest review score: 0 Welcome to the Jungle
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 84 out of 141
  2. Negative: 20 out of 141
141 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    Thanks to Lynch's expert pacing and modulation of narrative tension, even viewers who already know the outcome of the film's central incident will likely be pulled to the edges of their seats.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    This Ain't California is a masterful lie that illuminates a little-known reality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    A crash course in history, politics, and social science, Valentino's Ghost is both sobering and illuminating, and its execution is thrilling.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    If Secret can leave the viewer despairing, it's also hugely inspiring, thanks to Mino. She's one of the cinematic heroines of the year.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    Yudin pulls lovely philosophical grace notes from his subjects as they illuminate some universal truths from their very specific world.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Ernest Hardy
    It's charming, gently humorous, and beautifully attuned to the interior lives of children.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's a must-see for anyone interested in art.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    But real-life hard-knock plot twists, as well as some tweaking of form (there's no narrator or voiceover of any kind; the film's subjects outline their grim realities largely through their rhythmically upbeat songs) make the film absolutely riveting, as does the fiercely rousing music.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    At the film's center is Emily Watson's pitch-perfect performance as Margaret Humphreys, the real-life social worker who in 1986 stumbled over the hidden practice.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Cast with both professional and novice actors (which results in uneven performances), the beautifully shot film is filled with exquisite moments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    One marvel of the film is how it conveys so much information so quickly, and with such accessibility.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    The roles of affect and artifice in mediating the realities of racism, homophobia, and poverty are perhaps the true subjects of Shirley Clarke's landmark doc.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What saves the film—and grandly—is Nance’s wildly ambitious visual imagination. Teetering somewhere between film school precocity and impressively assured audaciousness...It’s almost hypnotic in its style and genre promiscuity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Old Dog has the look and feel of a documentary, which adds senses of urgency and immediacy to a tale that moves at a languid, but never boring, pace.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What makes Kuchu work as taut agitprop, and ultimately to devastating emotional effect, is that Wright and Zouhali-Worrall allow the enormity of the film's political concerns to be telegraphed through the stories, experiences, and astute analysis of ordinary queer folk and their hetero allies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's a smart, funny, tough-minded film crammed with data and personal anecdotes, each illuminating the other, each sketching in the staggering costs—and not just financial—of the ways authorities in this country have shaped the drug issue. It's far from glib.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Informant is riveting as it slowly assembles a damning profile of its subject. It's also timely.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Without forcing the material into facile uplift, Bloodworth-Thomason still edges it into the realm of inspirational, never overplaying the anguish or soft-pedaling the bigotry at the heart of the story.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    The film ends on up notes, but its strength is that it's not really a feel-good movie, instead shining a light on both how far we have come in terms of race in America and how very far we still have to go.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's utterly rousing watching the women master their instruments and then push past the birth pains of their new business enterprise, and it's completely wrenching as their individual backstories unfold.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Schwarz's juxtaposition of the human cost of the drug war alongside the glamorization of its henchmen and their brutality is sobering, even depressing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Though Neshoba is standard-issue in terms of craftsmanship, the tools used to tell the tale (newsreels, family photos, crime scene and autopsy photos) are masterfully employed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Though the film, based on Dallaire's memoir, can veer toward deification of the general, it's hugely effective.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Undertow, is sublime. Set in a small, picturesque Peruvian fishing village, it's less a coming-out tale than a magic realism–infused coming-of-consciousness love story.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Circo is filled with beautiful images and haunting moments, especially in the third act, when the family unravels as the film culminates in a final triumphant, haunting image.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    The movie floats to another realm entirely when the cameras go into the home of Nova Venerable, a smart, eloquent, gorgeous girl whose love for her special-needs younger brother and their hardworking single mom is expressed in terms that sidestep the formulaic verbal and physical bombast of so many of her peers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    It's the mind-blowing performance footage (and there's lots of it) that makes this a must-see film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Even those who closely follow African (or global) politics will likely be bowled over by the real-life plot twists unfolding before Merz's camera. What makes the film especially resonate now is the frustration with the status quo that is consistently voiced by the people on the street.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Fascinating and often devastating.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Marston nails the claustrophobia of small-town life and the turbulent emotionalism of teenagers, but what pushes the film toward sublimity is the way he delicately captures all of the characters' inner lives as their world slowly crumbles.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Filmed over a period of six weeks and supplemented with animated music sequences and chilling news footage of the terrifying deluge, Pray is both an elegy and a love letter.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Lean, fast-moving, and filled with game-changing fight sequences that have a brutally beautiful (or beautifully brutal) quality, Gareth Evans's Indonesian martial-arts film The Raid: Redemption lives up to its viral hype.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    A loving, exhaustive, warts-and-all look at the man who spent years battling his own alcoholism before a spiritual experience in the hospital set him on the course to help others.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    The film's emotional and psychological textures suffer for those losses, but Family is still riveting viewing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    From its low-key, guitar-based score by composer Chris Bacon to the filmmaker's refusal to sugar-coat the tough times some of the soldiers faced after completing the climb, High Ground takes its cues from the worldview of its subjects.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    It takes a minute for the film to move beyond a kind of gilded stasis, but once it does, it - and Plummer - are riveting.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Karpovsky is unsettlingly good as Paul, and Newman's Danielle is sexy and layered.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    The film is something of a paradox, simultaneously passionate and dispassionate, its ending tethered to both bruised triumph and a sense of things falling apart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Dirty Wars is essential viewing for anyone who wants to know how we wage war right now; it's also a chilling prologue for what's likely a global future of endless war and blowback.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    It does what the most powerful films and music have always done, which is to spark contemplation of our own lives and choices, and our place in the world, while also stoking compassion and empathy for lives far removed from our own.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    A documentary that is by turns exasperating, illuminating, and intentionally infuriating.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Director Ryan White has crafted a deceptively simple film that should almost immediately win viewers over with its low-key charm.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    It's an often gut-wrenching viewing experience in which the triumphs of the hero are hard won.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    What distinguishes this doc from much of the tedious critical prose Romero has inspired is the fan-boy and fan-girl ardor that fuels its smarts--both behind and in front of the camera.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    What emerges is an illuminating look at the ways race, specifically blackness, has been cynically portrayed by the mainstream media, rightwing politicians and religious leaders, and even some white queer activists.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    A film whose sense of urgency and purpose is utterly engrossing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Wendy J.N. Lee's Pad Yatra: A Green Odyssey powerfully connects the dots between the enormity of global warming as a phenomenon and the havoc it wreaks in ordinary lives.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    A small gem of a film, Breakfast is a lovely tapestry of subtlety, full of sly, smart humor and unforced insights into human nature.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Ernest Hardy
    Because her tale is so fascinating, movie-making formula is all that's needed.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Though the psychological layering and thematic ambition of the screenplay do not quite result in the depth intended, Hideaway's unsentimental performances will hook you.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    While the film is slight, predictable, and familiar, it's great popcorn fare.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    The film powerfully hits the note of universalism that is its goal; haven't many of us fallen for someone that we, they, and the world deem out of our league?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    In her tale of a brusque, prickly young Dutch woman who inexplicably cuts herself off from the world, except for a heavily circumscribed relationship with a man whose isolation is less voluntary, writer-director Urszula Antoniak hits a lot of expected notes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Negroponte's visuals are Doc 101-he simply points and shoots. But that doesn't matter; the life stories told (particularly Dimitri's) and the experiences of coming clean sell themselves.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    The supporting cast is uniformly fine, but the film rests on the delicate shoulders of Bonnaire, who carries it with a soulful, magnetic presence.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Shearer builds an airtight case to prove his thesis, and one of his most chilling arguments is a roll call of brave souls whose lives and careers have been systematically wrecked in pursuit of the truth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    These subplots hint at what could have been, nudging the film toward biting rather than obvious commentary on the intersections of gender, sexuality, and creativity, and the costs of thwarting expression of any of them. But Féret barely explores this, and the film suffers for it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Much of what's presented is familiar territory, but it's the moments that fracture prejudices and expectations that stick with you.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    A love letter to the group. Packed with fantastic performance footage, it solidly makes the case that, throughout the '80s and early '90s, Fishbone was one of rock's best live acts ever - furiously energetic, innovative, leaping multiple genres in a single song.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Tightly directed and well acted (even though many characters are cut-outs from every war movie you've ever seen), The Front Line shoehorns little known history into a familiar format, and it works.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    What gives the film its human dimension are the conflicting memories of former residents.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Buff gels into a surprisingly moving look at the machinations of the heart.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    The film trots out a who's who of great thinkers - Jane Goodall, Stephen Hawking, Margaret Atwood, assorted scientists and historians - who are riveting as they walk us through the question of whether we will or can survive progress. The anticapitalism prognosis is grim, and the hope offered is slim indeed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    A deceptively simple film, gingerly peels layer after layer of sharp insights into the dynamics of familial love, using compassion and droll humor as its tools. Its strength is that it manages to tap genuine emotion without succumbing to sentimentality.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Told in an elliptical style with a pacing and jagged rhythms that take some getting used to, the thrust and power of the film lies in its poetic imagery.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    The whole thing can be hard to follow, but the energy (and pulchritude) of the cast make it a perfectly fine bit of popcorn escapism.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Well-acted and directed, with melancholy grooved insights that will only be news to the young and narcissistic, Together is a pleasant way to while away an afternoon and see some old pros in great form.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    The appeal of Lunch might be limited to Hollywood-nostalgia buffs, but they will be enthralled not only by the stories told, but also how they're told. These guys are still some of the sharpest wits in town.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Beautifully shot, the film is unapologetically a crowd-pleaser whose gentleness of tone flows from its subject.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    It’s a moving tale made more so because even after he’s “won,” Pineda maintains a clear-eyed pragmatism about what living a fairy tale costs.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    What Venus and Serena does extraordinarily well is capture the work ethic and undersung smarts of the sisters while taking viewers deep into their enviably close relationship.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    The film isn't as smart on the issue of race as it needs to be, and its feminist read of the music and scene feels forced in places, but as an entry-level conversation starter, it gets the job done.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    Drumming doesn't quite have the skills to finesse the varying tones demanded by his textured script...and he could have taken one more pass on smoothing out character arcs, which are too truncated to be believable in a few cases. Still, the ensemble cast is fantastic, and Drumming is a talent to watch.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    The cast—and Evans's deft hand with them—makes it worth checking out.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Ernest Hardy
    An insightful, often funny, never glib character-driven tale about class angst, withered dreams, and the costs of adulthood.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    When Boote gets out of the way, the film is illuminating and infuriating.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    What's made powerfully clear is that we've reached a dire point of crisis that, while largely rooted in economics, is about so much more than dollars and cents.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    The film's scope is staggering, including its detailed outlining of BP's origins and fingerprints across decades of unrest in Iran.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    Although it's grotesque to see pre-teens stomping in underground warehouse-battle settings, at least Battlefield America's racial politics are interesting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    Volumes are said about class, assimilation, and the ways the assimilated sometimes shame and scar those who haven't shorn themselves of ethnic or racial signifiers. There is pungency in this shorthand, in these sketches that are richly evocative without saying too much or giving too little. You can't help but wish the movie had more of it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    This is powerful reportage, beautifully shot and gracefully laid out; too bad that Kendall ties it all up with more deep thoughts from the bus itself, thoughts that sound like outtakes from a TED Talk on the interconnectedness of all living things.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    Shamelessly manipulative, it's a highly effective if not very good film, its success entirely due to the talents of its cast. They bring heart to a script that is unabashedly about pushing buttons.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    A decently acted, often drolly funny, tautly directed thriller that proves to be a Russian doll of motivations, coincidences, and plot-twists; it would have been more satisfying if it weren't so unnecessarily convoluted.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Ernest Hardy
    Cudlitz gives a haunted performance as a weathered, misogynistic, homophobic, blue-collar man roiling with demons, and Griffith can break your heart as a good woman staggering under the weight of life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    The flaws pale against what's illustrated, which is not just how Prop. 8 passed, but the sordid, cynical workings of our political machine.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    That's why Special Treatment is so disheartening. The film, starring Huppert, quickly telegraphs that its ideas are too shallow for a talent as deep as hers.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    The cast is engaging, and there are a few light-chuckle moments, but the script needed another rewrite, and the film itself needed to be guided by a thornier sensibility than Fuller's.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    Tim eventually evolves out of smugness, but unfortunately, the film merely trades it for sappiness. Fischer, meanwhile, imbues Janice with a wounded soulfulness that cuts right through the clichés. The less said about a hideously wigged Topher Grace as a smarmy self-help author, the better.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    There are so many complicated political, religious, and cultural issues swirling around Yoni's story, and Follow Me keeps them on the sidelines. It is pure hagiography.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    Directed by Garner, Craigslist Joe is sweet, moving, and frustrating.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    The result often plays more like a satire of the fashion industry than a serious look at one of the humans inside it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    The costumes are gorgeous, and the settings are plush, but the acting is merely serviceable, and the film lacks either the wit or the energy of its predecessors. Long before it ends, you find yourself indifferent to the fate of the mismatched lovebirds or anyone else in the tale.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    The Colony has modest rewards: It's decently acted, delivers some well-executed jolts, doesn't insult the viewer's intelligence, and is mercifully free of ironic distance.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ernest Hardy
    While Escape is filled with inspired touches... Moore lacks the off-kilter psychological nuances of Lynch, as well as the go-for-broke storytelling skills and visual élan. It doesn't help that the cast is largely competent at best.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Ernest Hardy
    The film lacks a pulse. There's sound and fury, but the result is more drizzle than tempest.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Ernest Hardy
    A substandard romantic comedy gussied up in Indian drag.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Ernest Hardy
    Daydream is decently acted, overwritten, slickly shot, decked out with the requisite indie soundtrack, and propped up with angst-ridden poses and pouting lips. It's also another film in which on-screen teens, especially the nubile femme fatale at the center, are but vessels to showcase the screenwriter's irony-drenched, self-satisfied intellect.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Ernest Hardy
    Writer-director J.B. Ghuman Jr. shoehorns the character into a witlessly stitched homage to other films - notably "Heathers."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Ernest Hardy
    In many ways reminiscent of "Mesrine" but suffers greatly in comparison. It hits many of the same marks -- but the scenes unfold almost elliptically, never really building or illuminating character, and never sparking narrative momentum.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Ernest Hardy
    What follows is a film as odd as its title character. Timothy flings grown-up ideas at the viewer but rips the teeth from them rather than risk our discomfort.