For 557 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ernest Hardy's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Lowest review score: 0 Runaway Bride
Score distribution:
557 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Victor Vargas has the look and feel of a neo-realist masterpiece, yet captures New York with a burnished authenticity not seen since the glory days of ’70s American cinema.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What makes High Art remarkable is Cholodenko's refusal to put her characters or story through a filter, her unblinking willingness to dive right in.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Tough and relentless, dazzlingly researched and crafted. At its core is compassion for those who are angry, violent and uneducated.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    An especially compassionate look at human frailty that also never loses sight of the inherent ridiculousness of "the human condition." Jesus' Son is one of this summer's best movies.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    MTV, comic books and gangster flicks are all in Lola's cinematic family tree; it's a heady, breathless ride.
    • Film.com
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Leigh and his solid cast make sure that inside jokes translate to a broad audience, and that their rendering of the back-stage drama is smart, engrossing and often very funny.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    One of the best films of this year...unlike anything you've seen on the big screen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What leaves you breathless, though, is the knockout acting by the cast.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Lilya is the more genuinely unsettling film because Moodysson seems to actually know something of what it is to take and stumble beneath a crushing blow. You feel that here. And you feel it for days after.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Show Me Love has the pulse of teen life down-pat, shaming its many sleek and glossy American counterparts at every turn.
    • Film.com
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    A smart, seamless commentary on race, class and the expectations (or lack of) that are often attached to them. Kennedy is helped greatly by deep currents of heart and humor that pull you into the unfolding tale, and to the edge of your seat as the countdown to opening night begins.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    A dark film that raises more questions than it answers -- and it's meant to.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Belongs to the small rank of hip-hop films that actually have something to say -- and that say it with both style and intellectual bite.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's a must-see for anyone interested in art.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    But real-life hard-knock plot twists, as well as some tweaking of form (there's no narrator or voiceover of any kind; the film's subjects outline their grim realities largely through their rhythmically upbeat songs) make the film absolutely riveting, as does the fiercely rousing music.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    At the film's center is Emily Watson's pitch-perfect performance as Margaret Humphreys, the real-life social worker who in 1986 stumbled over the hidden practice.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Cast with both professional and novice actors (which results in uneven performances), the beautifully shot film is filled with exquisite moments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    One marvel of the film is how it conveys so much information so quickly, and with such accessibility.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What saves the film—and grandly—is Nance’s wildly ambitious visual imagination. Teetering somewhere between film school precocity and impressively assured audaciousness...It’s almost hypnotic in its style and genre promiscuity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    The roles of affect and artifice in mediating the realities of racism, homophobia, and poverty are perhaps the true subjects of Shirley Clarke's landmark doc.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Old Dog has the look and feel of a documentary, which adds senses of urgency and immediacy to a tale that moves at a languid, but never boring, pace.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    What makes Kuchu work as taut agitprop, and ultimately to devastating emotional effect, is that Wright and Zouhali-Worrall allow the enormity of the film's political concerns to be telegraphed through the stories, experiences, and astute analysis of ordinary queer folk and their hetero allies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's a smart, funny, tough-minded film crammed with data and personal anecdotes, each illuminating the other, each sketching in the staggering costs—and not just financial—of the ways authorities in this country have shaped the drug issue. It's far from glib.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Informant is riveting as it slowly assembles a damning profile of its subject. It's also timely.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    The film ends on up notes, but its strength is that it's not really a feel-good movie, instead shining a light on both how far we have come in terms of race in America and how very far we still have to go.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Without forcing the material into facile uplift, Bloodworth-Thomason still edges it into the realm of inspirational, never overplaying the anguish or soft-pedaling the bigotry at the heart of the story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    Schwarz's juxtaposition of the human cost of the drug war alongside the glamorization of its henchmen and their brutality is sobering, even depressing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's utterly rousing watching the women master their instruments and then push past the birth pains of their new business enterprise, and it's completely wrenching as their individual backstories unfold.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    While Hall and Shepard nail their parts, Don Johnson, still magnetic after all these years, steals the film as a sardonic private eye with a vintage cherry-red convertible.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Ernest Hardy
    It's an admittedly hagiographic film, an unabashed celebration of the man and his work and worldview. The few mild naysayers are largely set up to be knocked down, but as such the film is invigorating.