For 164 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 82% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 15% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

F. X. Feeney's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Godfather
Lowest review score: 10 Baby Geniuses
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 11 out of 164
164 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 F. X. Feeney
    Part poem, part jungle blossom, all brilliance.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 F. X. Feeney
    No parent who's been roped into leading the troops to a matinee need fear being bored: gags are, Simpsons-like, conceived to tickle several generations at once.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 F. X. Feeney
    The Godfather traces the arc of this doomed idealism with a beauty that is still fresh.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 F. X. Feeney
    One of the best films of the year thus far.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 F. X. Feeney
    Remains the most popularly successful film ever to render the inner life of an artist.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 F. X. Feeney
    It is one of the most beautifully staged American movies in a very long time.
    • Mr. Showbiz
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 F. X. Feeney
    Not only one of the best films of the year, it's one of the best films of the decade.
    • Mr. Showbiz
    • 90 Metascore
    • 95 F. X. Feeney
    The Japanese title means chaos, and that is what is let loose when a powerful king foolishly tries to release the reins of power, in the hopes of enjoying a peaceful old age.
    • Mr. Showbiz
    • 80 Metascore
    • 93 F. X. Feeney
    It's an exhilarating display of filmic artistry.
    • Mr. Showbiz
    • 50 Metascore
    • 92 F. X. Feeney
    I've not stopped thinking about it -- weighing might-have-beens and alternative courses of action, as though remembering an actual event rather than a nimble, superbly-realized fantasy. That's a first-rate achievement.
    • Mr. Showbiz
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Of the many excellent animated features Disney has produced over the past decade, this is the one that feels the freest, and sweetest.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    It's a cheerfully deranged stunt, executed in a spirit of infectious lunacy that powers the resulting film to its strongest laughs, and weirdest depths.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Writer-director Gianni Amelio masterfully chronicles the ways two people can betray each other, and especially themselves, in the name of love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    The deeper strength of Smoke Signals rests on the sensitivity and truthfulness of Farmer’s performance as the ebullient, self-hating alcoholic father, and that of Irene Bedard as the young woman he knew in later life.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    It works its magic with such exuberance and passion that the film's length becomes a part of its fun.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    What Harris extracts from himself is nothing less than a psychological nude scene, sustained across two hours.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Leonard Schrader adapted the screenplay from the novel by Manuel Puig, and his fearless willingness to explore every corner of human nature serves what is greatest and sweetest in the performances of William Hurt and Raul Julia.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    A superb film by any measure, as deep and harsh as the sin Dillon committed to become great.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Everyone plays their role (and the roles within their roles) to perfection, and writer-director Mamet keeps us guessing what's what and who's who right up until the final minute.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Above all, Oshima has fashioned a tale of men among men that feels familiar at first, then moves boldly into more enigmatic terrain.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    This is the deepest of Jewison's three racially themed films, the other two being "In the Heat of the Night" and "A Soldier's Story."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Astonishingly deep and moving.
    • Mr. Showbiz
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Yet Waiting for Guffman is never mean-spirited. Its weird warmth is perfectly embodied by Guest himself, whose flamboyant, stagestruck choreographer, Corky St. Clair, could have (in less ingenious hands) been a cruel, gay-bashing caricature, but instead becomes a hallucinatory Everyman.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    It's a film which aims to persuade us of its truth without props or signposts--and it does so with unforgettable beauty.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    LaGravenese (writer of "The Fisher King," adapter of "The Bridges of Madison County," making his directorial debut) eschews distractions of style and molds our attention to the performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    The alchemy of good acting under the pressure of sublime film sense makes for a miracle in the hearts of the audience.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    We never seem to be looking at actors, but at people; never at scenes, but at life unrehearsed.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Has power not only as film scholarship, but as an inquiry into cinema's interplay with our collective memories and the nature of history itself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    A delirious fable about every creature's need for espace.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    We're afforded the illusion of an omniscience so complete as to mark a pioneering breakthrough in movie storytelling, one not to be missed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Here is a ghost story so dynamic you could call it a ghost poem.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    It is worthy of comparison to the lifelike, character-rich films we cherish from that era (1970s), and is certainly one of the finest films to come out this year.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    Breakdown recalls so many good movies, in such unpredictable order, that by the end it simply stands on its own, a solid, logical, edge-of-the-seat sluiceway of escape and pursuit.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 F. X. Feeney
    eXistenZ gives us Cronenberg at his wittiest, and Leigh at her most vulnerable and fascinating.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 F. X. Feeney
    It's a disturbing film in the best sense.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 F. X. Feeney
    Byrne is a stand-up poet the way some actors are stand-up comics. His innate depth prompts The Usual Suspects to transcend its own cleverness--and this is the movie's smartest, least predictable surprise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 81 F. X. Feeney
    Has such perfect pitch in small matters that, as it builds, it proves no less capable in tackling bigger issues--and what begin as chuckles become deep belly laughs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Cox's own directorial style is innocent, in the sense of being original without ever straining for effect.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    This gets my vote as director Franco Zeffirelli’s finest film. Certainly, it’s his most personal.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    This is such a dazzlingly self-assured directorial debut that it's hard to know what to praise first.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    The fun is in getting there, and in the mechanics, charted by writer-director Francis Veber.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Dizdar maintains a knife-edged balance in tone throughout the film
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    It's a fresh installment in what appears to be a self-perpetuating sitcom of British life.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Writer-director Kasi Lemmons works fast, and the world she conjures is powerfully realized.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Cleverly structured, fast-paced, funny, even moving.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Director John Dahl ("Red Rock West," "The Last Seduction") has a pronounced knack for snap reversals and out-of-the-blue shocks.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    The Messenger may be a caricature of theology, but then Besson is a cartoonist of genius.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    A labor of love -- a swan song repaying a lifetime of happy debts to the theater, by grace of two terrific performances.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    It's fitting, then, that Dinner Rush boasts Hawks-ian virtues: fiery energy, swift, character-driven chitchat and a tough, upbeat sense of how the world works.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Above all, you've got Jennifer Grey, as a rich girl summering in the Catskills and falling for her working-class dance instructor, played by Patrick Swayze. The chemistry between them is red-hot, and they're wonderful dancers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Zhang's work is always worth watching, but this is the first of his films in which the sorrows are so heart-rending, its many comic moments so laugh-out-loud human.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    The Proposition is a very hard and harsh movie, but it also has a hypnotic, lyrical velocity. As Arthur, Huston exudes dead charisma.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Writer-director Hans Petter Moland (The Last Lieutenant, Zero Kelvin) has a fine eye for landscapes, but an even surer touch with actors.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Funny and light, all the more potent for seeming so effortless.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Chilean-born actress Leonor Varela (TV's Cleopatra, a few seasons back) plays Chavo's mother, who, in her rage to see her children survive, powerfully embodies the film's moral center.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Their discretion makes From Hell less a horror movie than a classical film noir.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    The film's discretion short-circuits any impulse we might have to regard Glennie as a handicapped person who has “overcome.” Instead, we're led to experience her life as she does - as an adventure in which setbacks are not challenges, but illuminations of untracked paths.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Pellington's sharp, fastball compositions and nerve-splintering cutting style are of a piece with such intelligence, devilishly mixing shock with optimism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Overall, Whitely's debut film may just fill you with an unexpectedly deep elation.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Writer-director Sebastian Cordero wrings nerve-racking suspense, and complex performances, from these dynamics.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    What transpires is so rich that I've seen this movie three times. The joy of being involved with two wholly truthful (if colorfully fucked up) characters is that exhilarating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    It's a first-rate chamber piece for actors, but Julie Christie brings a particularly layered depth to what could have been a very flat role; a combination of bereaved mother and castaway wife. Her torment and her intermittent joys are so fully communicated that they anchor the film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Demonstrating yet again that he knows few limits as an actor, Duvall not only nails the accent, he inhabits the man's flinty, grudge-bearing contrariness with such a furious commitment that it brings out the best in the actors around him.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Enigmas make Panic involving, and suspenseful.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Writer-director Carl Colpaert never loses his balance, despite the David Lynchian leap of faith he asks us to make midway, in a twist so bold as to be a backflip. If anything, this extra layer in the story effectively illuminates the moral choices Jesus must navigate.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Khouri manages, with terrific flair, to keep the extremes of screwball farce and blood-curdling family intensity on one continuum -- not only through the strength of the performances (including one from James Garner, who, as Sida's dad, gets the best one-liners) but in the ways they match across time.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Impeccably produced.
    • Mr. Showbiz
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    A sharp, upbeat, well-wrought meditation on love and race that kicks the new year in movies off to a terrific start.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    A superb, instructive portrait of an artist at work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    (Herzog's) tribute to Kinski doubles as a life-affirming monument to creation in all its variety.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    A smart, romantic, heartbreaking pleasure.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    The Wayanses can be crude beyond crude, but they're so clever that their inventiveness takes the place of taste.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Bergman's collaboration with Ullmann began when he directed her in "Persona" (1966). Here, with the roles nearly reversed, she shows herself as great an interpreter behind the camera.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    What makes Sunshine unique, what rewards a first viewing and lives in the mind long thereafter, is that Szabo has attempted to place Judaism and Christianity on a continuum that is both historically truthful and highly personal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    A witty, well-crafted comedy that combines primal slapstick with sharp satiric banter to keep children and parents laughing together.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Moll ratchets his suspense with impressive mastery, wringing a maximum of excruciating terror out of the humblest everyday materials.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    It's a sweet chamber piece, beautifully played.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    One's laughter builds on such a rising curve that memories of its flaws burn away.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Penn's own gifts as an actor seem, in turn, to bring out the best in Nicholson, as well as the rest of the cast.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    First-time director Baltasar Kormakur -- balances tones with a smooth, mature confidence.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Celebrity is one of Woody Allen’s finest. This is a minority opinion….But I prefer Allen when he works in a minor key – “Broadway Danny Rose,” “Radio Days” --precisely because he’s not trying to be profound, only true to firsthand observation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 F. X. Feeney
    Nearly three and a half hours in length, but owing to its freedom of movement, the film feels weightless.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 F. X. Feeney
    First-time writer-director Mark Hanlon creates a solidly trippy atmosphere.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Mystery Men gives proof that satire isn't dead.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Christine Lahti, making her directorial debut, wrings good laughs and strong emotion throughout, largely through the performances.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    The picture's deepest strength, however, is the fire Fernán-Gómez conjures from deep within himself, as if "honor" were an extinct volcano he could will into exploding, given enough anger and time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Writer-director David Jacobson has an excitingly clear-eyed, unsentimental feel for the intensity of adolescent passion.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Catches the volatile beauty of what it was to be alive and politically aware in the early '70s with a rare accuracy and depth.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Thrillingly unpredictable.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    It's great unruly fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    The sense of loss aroused by the film is oceanic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    You come away from Boiler Room eager to see what Younger will do next.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Seen in the bowl's metaphoric reflection, Nolte's Adam, with his patronizing wish to build a great art museum to "give something back" to the poor laborers who built his fortune, is a complex American monster.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Whaley successfully balances his scenes on a knife-edge of tenderness and anger that was Truffaut's trademark.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Among the pleasures the film evokes, as few films have, is the bliss of conversation.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    This bright farce is spun from interlocking coincidences that only seem far-fetched.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Even as the psychological interdependencies of the two boys take the foreground, the movie gets more and more crowded with fun-house surprises and cliffhanging set pieces.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    The main body of the film earns comparison with the military parables of John Ford, particularly "The Long Gray Line" and "The Wings of Eagles."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    Mamet's fixation on language is, nonetheless, more effective onstage than onscreen, where the technical and visual requirements distract from the sounds of the words -- the heart of Mamet's work.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 F. X. Feeney
    May lack any transcendent point that would make it exceptional, but it is certainly a worthy start, and worth catching.

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