Farran Smith Nehme

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For 310 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 310
310 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Making a movie this warm, funny, and rigorously truthful about lovers trying to remain partners is even harder.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    At some point in her 50-year career, Rampling became one of the world’s great actresses. Driven by her and Courtenay’s work, and by director Andrew Haigh’s limpid style, the film is devastating.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    All great films have imagination; this one also has the sense of experience.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Each scene is breathtaking, such as a long shot of a river at a key moment, and an unforgettable soccer game played with no ball. Timbuktu deserves every accolade it gets.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Andrey Zvyagintsev’s film combines allegory, brutal melodrama, black humor and strikingly beautiful compositions, each frame dense with meaning. Leviathan stays absolutely gripping, right up to the O. Henry twist that slams the film shut.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    A groundbreaking, highly influential film, A Man Vanishes is a fiercely brilliant piece of work, but it's more intellectual challenge than pleasure.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    “The past is past. I don’t want to remember . . . the wound is healed,” says Kemat, an Indonesian man who survived the massacre of more than 10,000 people at the Snake River in 1965. As this documentary shows, nothing could be further from the truth.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Often extremely funny, always thoughtful, the movie transcends its static nature to become a deeper picture of modern Iran than any news story could offer.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The filmmaker doesn't speculate about why these men are talking, but he leaves you with an excellent guess.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Ida
    Both actresses are extraordinary, but Kulesza — bitter, sarcastic and tragic — carries the movie’s soul.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    As Viviane, Elkabetz is fascinating, wielding an incredible variety of contemptuous looks.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    The cumulative impact is devastating, and very far from a simple Western condemnation of another country’s brutality. In forcing viewers to hear the boasts of genocide’s perpetrators, The Act of Killing puts a harsh spotlight on all celebrations of bloodshed, from Hollywood to the op-ed pages.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Yet while Nemes criticized “Schindler’s List” as “conventional,” all that’s new here is the hyper-realistic technique: Saul’s quest is not very far from the girl in the red dress.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The cast is excellent, particularly Timur Magomedgadzhiev as a conscience-stricken co-worker, but it’s Cotillard who’s in nearly every scene. Desperate, downtrodden, but grasping at each shred of hope, Cotillard — who won an Oscar playing Edith Piaf in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose” — carries the whole film.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Less tiring than a three-hour tramp through the halls, and considerably less expensive than a plane ticket, National Gallery gives the feeling of having seen everything there is to see.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    More than a thriller, Phoenix is a ghost story, made plain in an extraordinary shot of Nelly’s terror at a passing train.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beautiful to look at, with its burnished interiors and magnificent Turkish steppes, this long film builds to a powerful conclusion. Ceylan’s characters grind each other to a powder while hardly raising their voices.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Panh’s technique achieves things a conventional documentary could not, as when he pans across dozens of the clay figures jumbled in a box, in a shot that calls up both the toys of childhood, and graves.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    About Elly shows that the ethical dilemmas of ordinary adults can, with this level of talent, become as gripping as any thriller.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    The surreal images, offbeat jokes and pointed human-rights allegory make this an altogether different experience from most American animation. It’s dreamy, poetic and not to be missed.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    These elisions give an odd feeling to a film so long in the making. Crewdson's work ultimately begins to seem less enigmatic than he is himself.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sharpest, least sentimental and possibly the best version of Austen yet.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is the sort of movie that gets called “hallucinatory,” but it is strongly grounded in the New York in which 99 percent of us live. Fleischner gets his uncanny effects simply by showing what this city looks like to a child who has a different filter.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Petzold raises questions of honor and builds the romance with an absolutely rigorous lack of sentiment, moving Barbara to a sweeping finish as emotionally satisfying as any this year.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The closing subtitle says that no one was ever prosecuted for this madness. The pure-archive approach leaves a taste of despair; civic governance, it seems, can’t even promise not to kill you.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    This sounds like a comedy, and in its slow, deadpan way, that’s what The Treasure is; the film is an unusual mixture of joy and cynicism.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    If The Past doesn’t equal the masterpiece that preceded it, it’s still an exceptional film from a man who is clearly one of the best working directors.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Farhadi brings keen discernment to this unraveling marriage, and a third-act revelation packs a wallop.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film shows how quiet exteriors can mask deep interior lives, and how art feeds those lives. The view of art is richly intellectual, sometimes enthralling. But I confess, I liked Museum Hours best for answering a question I’ve always had: What is that guard thinking?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    He may be saddled with an overly ironic title role, but Bystrov is terrific. His cowboy squint and dogged intelligence are enough to give you hope for Russia, although the movie certainly won’t.

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