Farran Smith Nehme

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For 325 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 A Hijacking
Lowest review score: 0 Sirius
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 49 out of 325
325 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The firefights and chase scenes, no matter how much they adhere to genre, seem more real than the people trapped in the corruption.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The tone teeters between delicate and affected, and there’s only so much flitting around and soulful stares a movie can sustain before an audience starts wanting something more earthbound.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are some bright one-liners in the beginning, but the comedy/drama mix is an uneasy one, especially considering the shabby way the film treats McKenna, as a tart who’s just there to improve some yuppie sex lives.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In short, the crows are pests, but the movie shows them great affection, as do the humans who discuss the ways they must accommodate the crows. After a while it is impossible not to admire the birds’ intelligence and resilience, and see that perhaps it’s the other way around: The crows are the ones putting up with us.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Una Noche is intriguing enough, however, to make you hope that both Mulloy and her actors are heard from again, sooner rather than later.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Now, here’s the trilogy’s second installment, in which the jolly Austrian makes it clear that women of a certain age do not have his permission to overdo it with religion, either.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Annette Haywood-Carter films the proceedings with a sepia-tinged prettiness, but this is a Southern “Downton Abbey,” minus the loopy plot turns and wisecracks that make that series so addictive.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Given that the opening shot shows the heroine on the toilet, what a nice surprise to find that this is a pure love story, told with elegance and simplicity on a low budget.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    A movie about bisexuals sounds fresh and fun on paper, but a sensitive acoustic song under the opening credits shows exactly where The Happy Sad is going. Deadly earnestness and sex don’t mix well at the movies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Farahani determinedly underplays her character, and is often very touching. But while there is a satisfying final scene, The Patience Stone is essentially a monologue, and Atiq Rahimi (directing the adaptation of his own novel) doesn’t have what it takes to make the story more dynamic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s an entertaining melodrama of the old school that plays out with the clockwork inevitability of a “Columbo” episode.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The friction between a couple of still-struggling artists sounds rather depressing, but in fact the film is often funny; it shows that love is present in even the couple’s harshest exchanges.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    As pure comedy, it’s a hoot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The final scenes, when Mancini meets Kim’s son, have the awkward feel of an “Oprah” episode, with the editing and music suggesting a catharsis that isn’t always backed up by what’s on-screen.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    This morbid, cruel movie seems leached of all things that might inadvertently give viewers pleasure.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Cardinale’s few brief scenes are the ones with the most depth; her facial lines really did come along with some wisdom.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Breakup at a Wedding works, because Quinaz has come up with a concept that lets him skewer directorial pretension alongside wedding hysteria.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sincerity and simplicity of the film, however, lift it somewhat above the ordinary run.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie's most exciting when the precision and jaw-dropping nerve of the gang holds center stage.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a scrappy, unpretentious movie, with nicely calibrated pacing, but there’s no logic, little motivation and above all, no personalities.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Europe’s immigration dilemma was also the focus of Aki Kaurismaki’s winsome “Le Havre,” and the Africans themselves were front and center in Moussa Touré’s “La Pirogue.” This film is somewhat less effective; Crialese’s message seems to take priority over a deeper sense of individuals.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    First Comes Love seems punishingly long. It’s no more visually arresting than anybody else’s home movies, and the film’s creator fails to connect her subset of Manhattan privilege to anyone or anything other than herself.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beck expressed dismay that “Pimp” was taken as a glamorization of his life, and not a warning. By omitting the experiences of the women who worked for him, the filmmakers risk the same thing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    The cumulative impact is devastating, and very far from a simple Western condemnation of another country’s brutality. In forcing viewers to hear the boasts of genocide’s perpetrators, The Act of Killing puts a harsh spotlight on all celebrations of bloodshed, from Hollywood to the op-ed pages.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Copperhead has a more accurate period look, but dramatically it’s inert.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie was largely improvised, which lends itself more to scenes than a feature-length film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a compelling story, and Minac has told it before, notably in 2002’s “The Power of Good: Nicholas Winton.” This new documentary seems aimed at a classroom audience.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Ultimately, this film reveals the Israeli self-image, but not much more. The people with the cameras pass by Arab neighbors, and what the Palestinians’ home movies might look like remains unexplored.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Lifetime movies have their pleasures, and so does this film. Chief among them is the cast, a group of over-45 actresses who really are better than ever; in the cases of Brooke Shields and Daryl Hannah, remarkably better.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a wispy movie that does not end so much as peter out, and it could have benefited from a little more humor and a little less heinous male behavior. Miller and Farahani, though — both sometimes used previously as decoration — give strong performances as women bonding over their delight in both movement and their own beauty.

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