Farran Smith Nehme
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For 240 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Act of Killing
Lowest review score: 0 Sirius
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 240
240 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    At nearly three hours, it’s entirely too long, needlessly padded out with an intrusive interview-framing device.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Brief and timely, this documentary directed by Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia is also frustrating.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a simplicity and directness in Chaplin of the Mountains that keeps it aloft; its wholehearted sincerity feels much fresher than any number of slicker, more cynical films.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot doesn’t entirely escape formula, and the ending is jagged and forced, unable to commit to either hope or gloom. But for at least part of its length, My Brother the Devil brings refreshing changes to a genre badly in need of them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is, by some distance, the best movie of the three, and it showcases the impeccable symmetry of his compositions, while retaining his compulsion to wag a finger in your face.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Its sentiment is appealing, though, and its sincerity doesn’t cloy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Filmed on abstract sets, it’s full of playful touches, such as lines delivered in front of a screen that looks like a comic-strip panel, and glimpses of a mole puppet popping out from a fake lawn.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The firefights and chase scenes, no matter how much they adhere to genre, seem more real than the people trapped in the corruption.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    By refusing to consider that Dickens and Ternan ever brought each other any happiness, the movie is more Victorian in its attitudes than even some Victorians were.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Some of the film's flourishes are ill-judged.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sincerity and simplicity of the film, however, lift it somewhat above the ordinary run.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s involving, as biopics go, but the shattering debates that still swirl around Arendt’s view of the Holocaust are relegated to walk-ons.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Other Son is played with warmth and conviction by its cast. But it's also a little pat and toothless, set in an Israel where not even the notorious border crossings seem that difficult.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is passionate, but not exactly revelatory.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a baggy movie, with some things (such as whether Idris taking Ritalin in high school improved his performance) unexplained, and it may appeal most to those raising kids themselves.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    In terms of its outlook for young girls in Georgia, the movie title might as well be “Buried Alive.”
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sex is the main thing that makes Kiss of the Damned worthwhile.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This enigma-delivery system from a sharp mind has enthralling moments but becomes a bit enervating in its self-seriousness. By the end, the whole thing feels more academic than mind-bending.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Played with enormous charm by Samuel Lange Zambrano, Junior is a handsome kid.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Ava DuVernay, in showing Ruby's life in waiting, occasionally lets the pace slip into tedium.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Saint Laurent was known for an almost monk-like focus on his work. And so this film springs to life — the actors, the camera, the editing — when we see his creations the way they were meant to be seen: in motion, and worn by beautiful women.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The biographical bits soon feel like a distraction from the music, performed by Gavilán. It’s heard often, but not often enough. Judging by the movie, Parra’s songs are fiery and haunting, sometimes sensuous, sometimes bleak. When Parra sings, the movie becomes worthwhile.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Though the filmmaking is not terribly exciting, Fela’s life and music are.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Somehow, mostly through the impassioned performances of its young actors, the film finds its footing in the third act, as the narration goes quiet and tragedy unfolds with precision, even elegance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    11 Flowers boils down to a coming-of-age tale merged with a why-dunit — not unlike “To Kill a Mockingbird” — but the plot is molasses-slow, as threads are dropped, picked up and dropped again.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is no masterpiece, but neither is it a disaster. In its steady great-books way, the film is often truthful and moving.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a brief movie, and perhaps all that preamble is meant to justify the ticket price. The best advice is to walk in about 25 minutes after the lights go down. You’ll still get all the laughs, and you won’t have to hear about Hart’s YouTube hits.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    A Royal Affair is basically a good-looking set of historical Cliffs Notes. There, is however, one excellent reason to see it: Folsgaard, who by the end has made his betrayed and bereft Christian into a figure of genuine tragedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The conclusion feels too good-natured after nearly two hours of a minister who would need typed instructions to butter a baguette.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Mumblecore founding father Joe Swanberg is back with this amiable off-season tale of Chicago millennials and their dissatisfactions. It offers his characteristic you-are-there visuals, rackety sound and meandering dialogue, often with appealing results.

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