Farran Smith Nehme
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For 211 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Amour
Lowest review score: 0 Sirius
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 211
211 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    When The Last Gladiators treats brawls like greatest-hits clips for more than half the movie, then suggests fighting is behind Nilan's decline, it feels like trying to have it both ways.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    11 Flowers boils down to a coming-of-age tale merged with a why-dunit — not unlike “To Kill a Mockingbird” — but the plot is molasses-slow, as threads are dropped, picked up and dropped again.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sex is the main thing that makes Kiss of the Damned worthwhile.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a brief movie, and perhaps all that preamble is meant to justify the ticket price. The best advice is to walk in about 25 minutes after the lights go down. You’ll still get all the laughs, and you won’t have to hear about Hart’s YouTube hits.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The biographical bits soon feel like a distraction from the music, performed by Gavilán. It’s heard often, but not often enough. Judging by the movie, Parra’s songs are fiery and haunting, sometimes sensuous, sometimes bleak. When Parra sings, the movie becomes worthwhile.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot doesn’t entirely escape formula, and the ending is jagged and forced, unable to commit to either hope or gloom. But for at least part of its length, My Brother the Devil brings refreshing changes to a genre badly in need of them.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is no masterpiece, but neither is it a disaster. In its steady great-books way, the film is often truthful and moving.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    At nearly three hours, it’s entirely too long, needlessly padded out with an intrusive interview-framing device.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Time has robbed Blume’s subjects of shock value, but her perceptiveness hasn’t dimmed. The movie’s sincerity carries it along, and makes this story endearing despite its filmmaking clichés.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winocour skillfully films Augustine being exhibited for other doctors in several disturbingly erotic scenes, but elsewhere Soko’s stolid, one-note demeanor takes a toll. The script, which gives Augustine no background and mostly shows her either being “treated” or having an episode, doesn’t help.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s involving, as biopics go, but the shattering debates that still swirl around Arendt’s view of the Holocaust are relegated to walk-ons.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    If the movie has a star, it may be cinematographer Oleg Mutu, the Romanian who lensed “The Death of Mr. Lazarescu” and “4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days.” Even when the pace wanes, the images are still gripping.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sincerity and simplicity of the film, however, lift it somewhat above the ordinary run.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This film is best when arguing that drugs should be treated as a multibillion-dollar commodity business in need of regulation, and not as a moral failing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Europe’s immigration dilemma was also the focus of Aki Kaurismaki’s winsome “Le Havre,” and the Africans themselves were front and center in Moussa Touré’s “La Pirogue.” This film is somewhat less effective; Crialese’s message seems to take priority over a deeper sense of individuals.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The final scenes, when Mancini meets Kim’s son, have the awkward feel of an “Oprah” episode, with the editing and music suggesting a catharsis that isn’t always backed up by what’s on-screen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a baggy movie, with some things (such as whether Idris taking Ritalin in high school improved his performance) unexplained, and it may appeal most to those raising kids themselves.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    By refusing to consider that Dickens and Ternan ever brought each other any happiness, the movie is more Victorian in its attitudes than even some Victorians were.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The firefights and chase scenes, no matter how much they adhere to genre, seem more real than the people trapped in the corruption.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is a handsome movie, rich in period detail, but the stately pace slows to a crawl in the second half.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is, by some distance, the best movie of the three, and it showcases the impeccable symmetry of his compositions, while retaining his compulsion to wag a finger in your face.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Technically, the film isn’t terribly exciting: talking heads interspersed with shots of young people making their symbolic “leap of faith” from the walls. But the directors have chosen eloquent interviewees, and the passionate attachment they feel for their city gives the film heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The story is something of a trap: Both irresistibly poignant and an invitation to wallow.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    In terms of its outlook for young girls in Georgia, the movie title might as well be “Buried Alive.”
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Though the filmmaking is not terribly exciting, Fela’s life and music are.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Mumblecore founding father Joe Swanberg is back with this amiable off-season tale of Chicago millennials and their dissatisfactions. It offers his characteristic you-are-there visuals, rackety sound and meandering dialogue, often with appealing results.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Saint Laurent was known for an almost monk-like focus on his work. And so this film springs to life — the actors, the camera, the editing — when we see his creations the way they were meant to be seen: in motion, and worn by beautiful women.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a simplicity and directness in Chaplin of the Mountains that keeps it aloft; its wholehearted sincerity feels much fresher than any number of slicker, more cynical films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The conclusion feels too good-natured after nearly two hours of a minister who would need typed instructions to butter a baguette.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a swift, vivid movie, but 10 years past the scandal, not much is new.