Farran Smith Nehme
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For 246 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Caesar Must Die
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 246
246 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The results are remarkably intelligent and entertaining, even for someone who (like this writer) finds Cave’s music rather dirge-like.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Terry’s talent is so magical that you may wish there were longer snippets of his playing. Still, this is a wonderful portrait of two artists strengthened by friendship.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Eerie and utterly riveting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    We know Paris never went anywhere, and the film’s a little too flashy and theatrical, with too-neat ironies. As a duel between acting talents, though, this is first-rate.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In a way, this marvelous movie does show that the Mekons have declined, because they’ve become the one thing punk rockers never ever want to be: lovable.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Less tiring than a three-hour tramp through the halls, and considerably less expensive than a plane ticket, National Gallery gives the feeling of having seen everything there is to see.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Soviet era is more interesting than the NHL years, but still, the film is entertaining even for ardent nonfans.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    If this documentary is swift and witty, that’s in part because it relies heavily on clips of Orson Welles talking. And oh, how Welles could talk, that beautiful voice wrapping itself around tall tales and wine commercials with equal grace.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beautiful to look at, with its burnished interiors and magnificent Turkish steppes, this long film builds to a powerful conclusion. Ceylan’s characters grind each other to a powder while hardly raising their voices.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    This film loves its characters, but loves their ideals even more.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    A delightfully immersive look at how a ballet is created, Jody Lee Lipes’ documentary is a stark contrast to the psycho theatrics of something like “Black Swan.”
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is nominated for this year’s Best Foreign Film Oscar, and it doesn’t deserve to snatch the prize from the towering likes of “Ida,” “Timbuktu” or “Leviathan.” Yet in its gaudy, predictable way, Wild Tales is enormous fun, and the consistent wit of the quiet stretches shows there’s more to Szifrón than shock tactics.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a superficial resemblance to the Dardenne brothers’ “Two Days, One Night,” and like that film it has a strong lead; Gosheva’s Nade is prickly, and no suffering saint.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is hard on the eyes, having been shot in a low-budget style with the ubiquitous digital palette of gray-beige-taupe. Fortunately, it’s also hilarious, full of humor that is understated, wry and dependent on familiarity with interests as wide as Houellebecq’s own.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is the penultimate film of Albert Maysles, who died on March 5, and Iris has a bit in common with “Grey Gardens,” his masterpiece. Apfel, unlike the Edies of that movie, is sane — so much so that the movie’s main flaw is lack of conflict. Iris’ marriage to Carl, who turned 100 during filming, is incredibly sweet.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Ava DuVernay, in showing Ruby's life in waiting, occasionally lets the pace slip into tedium.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Other Son is played with warmth and conviction by its cast. But it's also a little pat and toothless, set in an Israel where not even the notorious border crossings seem that difficult.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    A Royal Affair is basically a good-looking set of historical Cliffs Notes. There, is however, one excellent reason to see it: Folsgaard, who by the end has made his betrayed and bereft Christian into a figure of genuine tragedy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Some of the film's flourishes are ill-judged.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Somehow, mostly through the impassioned performances of its young actors, the film finds its footing in the third act, as the narration goes quiet and tragedy unfolds with precision, even elegance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Oddly, though, for a film so dedicated to celebrating what he can still accomplish, his early performing career gets a lot more emphasis than the music still being composed. And that's a pity, because what little we hear is entrancing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Things go awry in the last act, as the movie stops dead for more songs and a tragic coda that seems forced and trite, rather than the three-hankie finale we've all earned. Still, Cumming is wonderful.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    When The Last Gladiators treats brawls like greatest-hits clips for more than half the movie, then suggests fighting is behind Nilan's decline, it feels like trying to have it both ways.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    11 Flowers boils down to a coming-of-age tale merged with a why-dunit — not unlike “To Kill a Mockingbird” — but the plot is molasses-slow, as threads are dropped, picked up and dropped again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot doesn’t entirely escape formula, and the ending is jagged and forced, unable to commit to either hope or gloom. But for at least part of its length, My Brother the Devil brings refreshing changes to a genre badly in need of them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The biographical bits soon feel like a distraction from the music, performed by Gavilán. It’s heard often, but not often enough. Judging by the movie, Parra’s songs are fiery and haunting, sometimes sensuous, sometimes bleak. When Parra sings, the movie becomes worthwhile.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This enigma-delivery system from a sharp mind has enthralling moments but becomes a bit enervating in its self-seriousness. By the end, the whole thing feels more academic than mind-bending.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is no masterpiece, but neither is it a disaster. In its steady great-books way, the film is often truthful and moving.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sex is the main thing that makes Kiss of the Damned worthwhile.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winocour skillfully films Augustine being exhibited for other doctors in several disturbingly erotic scenes, but elsewhere Soko’s stolid, one-note demeanor takes a toll. The script, which gives Augustine no background and mostly shows her either being “treated” or having an episode, doesn’t help.

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