Farran Smith Nehme

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For 290 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Caesar Must Die
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 290
290 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Its tactile feel for the dirt and labor of a farm, and tender regard for the young protagonist, are immensely endearing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    There isn’t a lot here about her films, or great performances, but this is two hours of Ingrid Bergman, much of it rarely seen before. I’m not about to complain.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie doesn’t rise above its music-doc formula of photo, clip, talking head. But for fans — like me — it’s a heartfelt, engrossing tribute.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    This sounds like a comedy, and in its slow, deadpan way, that’s what The Treasure is; the film is an unusual mixture of joy and cynicism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Garrel’s ideas on both are pretty old-fashioned. But he wraps it up with a pleasurable O. Henry-like twist, and a moment of what feels suspiciously like true love.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Nees lean toward the rat-a-tat comedy of “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” presumably knowing they can’t match the profundity of “Huckleberry Finn.” (Who could?)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The overall film is a mix of “The Thin Blue Line” and Costa-Gavras’ “Z.” At times overemphatic (no one will ever accuse Gitai of holding too much back), this docu-thriller is also agonizingly suspenseful, despite the foreordained conclusion.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Despite a too-tidy wrap-up, it’s a humane film, one that sees the war as a tragedy for the Afghans, not just Western soldiers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Ava DuVernay, in showing Ruby's life in waiting, occasionally lets the pace slip into tedium.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Other Son is played with warmth and conviction by its cast. But it's also a little pat and toothless, set in an Israel where not even the notorious border crossings seem that difficult.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    A Royal Affair is basically a good-looking set of historical Cliffs Notes. There, is however, one excellent reason to see it: Folsgaard, who by the end has made his betrayed and bereft Christian into a figure of genuine tragedy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Some of the film's flourishes are ill-judged.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Somehow, mostly through the impassioned performances of its young actors, the film finds its footing in the third act, as the narration goes quiet and tragedy unfolds with precision, even elegance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Oddly, though, for a film so dedicated to celebrating what he can still accomplish, his early performing career gets a lot more emphasis than the music still being composed. And that's a pity, because what little we hear is entrancing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Things go awry in the last act, as the movie stops dead for more songs and a tragic coda that seems forced and trite, rather than the three-hankie finale we've all earned. Still, Cumming is wonderful.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    When The Last Gladiators treats brawls like greatest-hits clips for more than half the movie, then suggests fighting is behind Nilan's decline, it feels like trying to have it both ways.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    11 Flowers boils down to a coming-of-age tale merged with a why-dunit — not unlike “To Kill a Mockingbird” — but the plot is molasses-slow, as threads are dropped, picked up and dropped again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot doesn’t entirely escape formula, and the ending is jagged and forced, unable to commit to either hope or gloom. But for at least part of its length, My Brother the Devil brings refreshing changes to a genre badly in need of them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The biographical bits soon feel like a distraction from the music, performed by Gavilán. It’s heard often, but not often enough. Judging by the movie, Parra’s songs are fiery and haunting, sometimes sensuous, sometimes bleak. When Parra sings, the movie becomes worthwhile.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This enigma-delivery system from a sharp mind has enthralling moments but becomes a bit enervating in its self-seriousness. By the end, the whole thing feels more academic than mind-bending.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is no masterpiece, but neither is it a disaster. In its steady great-books way, the film is often truthful and moving.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sex is the main thing that makes Kiss of the Damned worthwhile.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winocour skillfully films Augustine being exhibited for other doctors in several disturbingly erotic scenes, but elsewhere Soko’s stolid, one-note demeanor takes a toll. The script, which gives Augustine no background and mostly shows her either being “treated” or having an episode, doesn’t help.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s involving, as biopics go, but the shattering debates that still swirl around Arendt’s view of the Holocaust are relegated to walk-ons.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Time has robbed Blume’s subjects of shock value, but her perceptiveness hasn’t dimmed. The movie’s sincerity carries it along, and makes this story endearing despite its filmmaking clichés.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    If the movie has a star, it may be cinematographer Oleg Mutu, the Romanian who lensed “The Death of Mr. Lazarescu” and “4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days.” Even when the pace wanes, the images are still gripping.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This film is best when arguing that drugs should be treated as a multibillion-dollar commodity business in need of regulation, and not as a moral failing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    At nearly three hours, it’s entirely too long, needlessly padded out with an intrusive interview-framing device.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a brief movie, and perhaps all that preamble is meant to justify the ticket price. The best advice is to walk in about 25 minutes after the lights go down. You’ll still get all the laughs, and you won’t have to hear about Hart’s YouTube hits.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Europe’s immigration dilemma was also the focus of Aki Kaurismaki’s winsome “Le Havre,” and the Africans themselves were front and center in Moussa Touré’s “La Pirogue.” This film is somewhat less effective; Crialese’s message seems to take priority over a deeper sense of individuals.

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