For 203 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Act of Killing
Lowest review score: 0 Sirius
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 203
203 movie reviews
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The results are too predictable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gorgeous surroundings don't make up for sulky, feuding travel companions.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Coming Up Roses swerves into a third-act twist that's both an indie cliché and dramatically unnecessary.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The performances are so uniformly good that it's a shame the characters are stuck with such a listless plot.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The stalker-enabling menace of Facebook is largely abandoned by midpoint, and Brief Reunion won't even prompt most people to change their privacy settings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film keeps its focus small, but the trouble is, the characters' emotions stay that way, too.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    At its best, Shanghai Calling is mildly diverting.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The next time Siddig plays a man of intrigue, let’s hope he’s chasing something more interesting than a clueless kid.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    By the movie’s end, the party guests may be ready to dance the hora — or they may find themselves sitting this one out. “Hava” will have its revenge, however: It’s still stuck in my head.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Most of the humor, though, is wan, exemplified by letters like “Dear General Lee: Sounds great! Please proceed with your plan.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Baran bo Odar puts all this in the service of ghastly clichés. The rape of children has long since grown nauseatingly familiar, in books, in films, in each season of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Toward the end, despite the wintry script and chilly acting, some emotion begins to break through. But it’s never a good sign when the art direction offers more fascination than the sex.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gould’s lugubrious presence is always welcome, and Rue plays her lovelorn part with verve.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Detour does a fine job of giving drivers yet another reason to stress out, but that anxiety doesn’t extend to its hero’s fate.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a good cinephile heart beating under this fluffy story. But Lellouche, in making her homage to Allen, left out one of his essential qualities: bite. Paris-Manhattan drifts by and never leaves a single toothmark.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The debut film of Brandon Cronenberg deals out shivers and flinches in little hypodermic jabs.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    If anyone in the store’s history ever had a bad experience there, you won’t find it in this movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The main problem is the criminal subplot, full of Aussie villains snarling “mate” at one another and landing bloodless punches on Dean. 33 Postcards is what happens when someone grafts a prison angle onto “Pollyanna” — the tough guys just get in the way.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Trouble is, while the social milieu is nicely realized, other parts of the drama are not. Too often Burshtein cuts off a scene prematurely, darting away just as the crucial moment of emotion or confrontation appears.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Despite a remarkable performance by Suliman, who’s almost never off-camera, events become increasingly pat and implausible, with one explanatory scene played like a shadowy variation on Kevin Spacey’s monologue in “Se7en.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winter hits his stride detailing how the music bigwigs hung Napster out to dry, but couldn’t do a thing about their industry’s permanently altered business model. This exercise in recent nostalgia (the original Napster went bust in 2002) might have been better if the tart cynicism of that section had shown up earlier.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The two leads spend a lot of their time doing static interviews, in a format familiar from TV shows like “The Office.” This glorified narration gets old, fast.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are a handful of moments to entrance a non-fan. When the musicians and singers assemble to sing “Proserpina,” the last song McGarrigle ever wrote, with its haunting refrain (“Come home to Mama”), the effect is transcendent.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Lifetime movies have their pleasures, and so does this film. Chief among them is the cast, a group of over-45 actresses who really are better than ever; in the cases of Brooke Shields and Daryl Hannah, remarkably better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Ultimately, this film reveals the Israeli self-image, but not much more. The people with the cameras pass by Arab neighbors, and what the Palestinians’ home movies might look like remains unexplored.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a compelling story, and Minac has told it before, notably in 2002’s “The Power of Good: Nicholas Winton.” This new documentary seems aimed at a classroom audience.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie was largely improvised, which lends itself more to scenes than a feature-length film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beck expressed dismay that “Pimp” was taken as a glamorization of his life, and not a warning. By omitting the experiences of the women who worked for him, the filmmakers risk the same thing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Cardinale’s few brief scenes are the ones with the most depth; her facial lines really did come along with some wisdom.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Farahani determinedly underplays her character, and is often very touching. But while there is a satisfying final scene, The Patience Stone is essentially a monologue, and Atiq Rahimi (directing the adaptation of his own novel) doesn’t have what it takes to make the story more dynamic.