Farran Smith Nehme
Select another critic »
For 214 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Act of Killing
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 214
214 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    An explosion of images, mixing seedy, hand-held reality with groovy grindhouse imitations. Most of the shots are vivid, some are even thrilling.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is a handsome movie, rich in period detail, but the stately pace slows to a crawl in the second half.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Saint Laurent was known for an almost monk-like focus on his work. And so this film springs to life — the actors, the camera, the editing — when we see his creations the way they were meant to be seen: in motion, and worn by beautiful women.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Its sentiment is appealing, though, and its sincerity doesn’t cloy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Though the filmmaking is not terribly exciting, Fela’s life and music are.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Mumblecore founding father Joe Swanberg is back with this amiable off-season tale of Chicago millennials and their dissatisfactions. It offers his characteristic you-are-there visuals, rackety sound and meandering dialogue, often with appealing results.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Brief and timely, this documentary directed by Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia is also frustrating.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Jealousy has a quiet melancholy that’s very pleasing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    These characters, especially the uninteresting primary couple, can't sustain almost two hours of movie. Overall, BearCity 2 deals in mild amusement, not wit.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The results are too predictable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gorgeous surroundings don't make up for sulky, feuding travel companions.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Coming Up Roses swerves into a third-act twist that's both an indie cliché and dramatically unnecessary.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The performances are so uniformly good that it's a shame the characters are stuck with such a listless plot.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The stalker-enabling menace of Facebook is largely abandoned by midpoint, and Brief Reunion won't even prompt most people to change their privacy settings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film keeps its focus small, but the trouble is, the characters' emotions stay that way, too.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    At its best, Shanghai Calling is mildly diverting.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The next time Siddig plays a man of intrigue, let’s hope he’s chasing something more interesting than a clueless kid.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    By the movie’s end, the party guests may be ready to dance the hora — or they may find themselves sitting this one out. “Hava” will have its revenge, however: It’s still stuck in my head.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Most of the humor, though, is wan, exemplified by letters like “Dear General Lee: Sounds great! Please proceed with your plan.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Baran bo Odar puts all this in the service of ghastly clichés. The rape of children has long since grown nauseatingly familiar, in books, in films, in each season of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Toward the end, despite the wintry script and chilly acting, some emotion begins to break through. But it’s never a good sign when the art direction offers more fascination than the sex.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gould’s lugubrious presence is always welcome, and Rue plays her lovelorn part with verve.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Detour does a fine job of giving drivers yet another reason to stress out, but that anxiety doesn’t extend to its hero’s fate.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a good cinephile heart beating under this fluffy story. But Lellouche, in making her homage to Allen, left out one of his essential qualities: bite. Paris-Manhattan drifts by and never leaves a single toothmark.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The debut film of Brandon Cronenberg deals out shivers and flinches in little hypodermic jabs.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    If anyone in the store’s history ever had a bad experience there, you won’t find it in this movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The main problem is the criminal subplot, full of Aussie villains snarling “mate” at one another and landing bloodless punches on Dean. 33 Postcards is what happens when someone grafts a prison angle onto “Pollyanna” — the tough guys just get in the way.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Trouble is, while the social milieu is nicely realized, other parts of the drama are not. Too often Burshtein cuts off a scene prematurely, darting away just as the crucial moment of emotion or confrontation appears.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Despite a remarkable performance by Suliman, who’s almost never off-camera, events become increasingly pat and implausible, with one explanatory scene played like a shadowy variation on Kevin Spacey’s monologue in “Se7en.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winter hits his stride detailing how the music bigwigs hung Napster out to dry, but couldn’t do a thing about their industry’s permanently altered business model. This exercise in recent nostalgia (the original Napster went bust in 2002) might have been better if the tart cynicism of that section had shown up earlier.