Farran Smith Nehme
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For 249 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 About Elly
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 249
249 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    11 Flowers boils down to a coming-of-age tale merged with a why-dunit — not unlike “To Kill a Mockingbird” — but the plot is molasses-slow, as threads are dropped, picked up and dropped again.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is no masterpiece, but neither is it a disaster. In its steady great-books way, the film is often truthful and moving.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a brief movie, and perhaps all that preamble is meant to justify the ticket price. The best advice is to walk in about 25 minutes after the lights go down. You’ll still get all the laughs, and you won’t have to hear about Hart’s YouTube hits.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    A Royal Affair is basically a good-looking set of historical Cliffs Notes. There, is however, one excellent reason to see it: Folsgaard, who by the end has made his betrayed and bereft Christian into a figure of genuine tragedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The conclusion feels too good-natured after nearly two hours of a minister who would need typed instructions to butter a baguette.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Mumblecore founding father Joe Swanberg is back with this amiable off-season tale of Chicago millennials and their dissatisfactions. It offers his characteristic you-are-there visuals, rackety sound and meandering dialogue, often with appealing results.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This film is best when arguing that drugs should be treated as a multibillion-dollar commodity business in need of regulation, and not as a moral failing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Intrigue doesn’t begin until the last third of the movie, which is by far the best part. The Victorian melodrama in Effie Gray works better than the Victorian suffering.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The main problem is the criminal subplot, full of Aussie villains snarling “mate” at one another and landing bloodless punches on Dean. 33 Postcards is what happens when someone grafts a prison angle onto “Pollyanna” — the tough guys just get in the way.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Agreeable this film certainly is, but the shagginess never seems to take shape.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The tone teeters between delicate and affected, and there’s only so much flitting around and soulful stares a movie can sustain before an audience starts wanting something more earthbound.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The stalker-enabling menace of Facebook is largely abandoned by midpoint, and Brief Reunion won't even prompt most people to change their privacy settings.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    By the movie’s end, the party guests may be ready to dance the hora — or they may find themselves sitting this one out. “Hava” will have its revenge, however: It’s still stuck in my head.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Trouble is, while the social milieu is nicely realized, other parts of the drama are not. Too often Burshtein cuts off a scene prematurely, darting away just as the crucial moment of emotion or confrontation appears.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    At its best, Shanghai Calling is mildly diverting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Una Noche is intriguing enough, however, to make you hope that both Mulloy and her actors are heard from again, sooner rather than later.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Most of the humor, though, is wan, exemplified by letters like “Dear General Lee: Sounds great! Please proceed with your plan.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a compelling story, and Minac has told it before, notably in 2002’s “The Power of Good: Nicholas Winton.” This new documentary seems aimed at a classroom audience.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The cast, so packed with talent that Jean Reno and Cherry Jones barely register, is stuck with stagey dialogue. Juliet Rylance, in the Nina part, has a particularly hard time. But there are good points, including Janney’s obvious pleasure in her part.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie was largely improvised, which lends itself more to scenes than a feature-length film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Farahani determinedly underplays her character, and is often very touching. But while there is a satisfying final scene, The Patience Stone is essentially a monologue, and Atiq Rahimi (directing the adaptation of his own novel) doesn’t have what it takes to make the story more dynamic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The photographs on view are dazzling; the way they are shown here is somewhat less so.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beck expressed dismay that “Pimp” was taken as a glamorization of his life, and not a warning. By omitting the experiences of the women who worked for him, the filmmakers risk the same thing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Eva
    In the last half-hour, themes start to gel. The final scenes are so good, even moving, that they make the earlier stuff look better. But a film concerned with the nature of emotion needs human engagement throughout.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Directors Aron Gaudet and Gita Pullapilly overload their too-long film with subplots. Yet the actors — including a terrific Aiden Gillen (“Game of Thrones”) as Casper’s no-good father — perform as though unaware that any of this is a cliché.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    These characters, especially the uninteresting primary couple, can't sustain almost two hours of movie. Overall, BearCity 2 deals in mild amusement, not wit.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are a handful of moments to entrance a non-fan. When the musicians and singers assemble to sing “Proserpina,” the last song McGarrigle ever wrote, with its haunting refrain (“Come home to Mama”), the effect is transcendent.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gould’s lugubrious presence is always welcome, and Rue plays her lovelorn part with verve.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The second half is therefore much more interesting than the first; even so, the whole movie suffers from a lack of narrative momentum and a surfeit of wordless shots of men exchanging deep, meaningful glances.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    More a tribute to youth and its discontents than a fresh exploration.

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