Farran Smith Nehme
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For 222 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 More Than Honey
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 222
222 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    All great films have imagination; this one also has the sense of experience.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Petzold raises questions of honor and builds the romance with an absolutely rigorous lack of sentiment, moving Barbara to a sweeping finish as emotionally satisfying as any this year.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Making a movie this warm, funny, and rigorously truthful about lovers trying to remain partners is even harder.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Such is literature’s power that the cast is more at ease portraying ancient Romans than speaking as versions of themselves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves is the purest, boldest re-imagining of silent cinema yet.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    The cumulative impact is devastating, and very far from a simple Western condemnation of another country’s brutality. In forcing viewers to hear the boasts of genocide’s perpetrators, The Act of Killing puts a harsh spotlight on all celebrations of bloodshed, from Hollywood to the op-ed pages.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    A Hijacking is Lindholm’s second feature as director; he’s also worked with such austere Danes as Thomas Vinterberg of Dogme 95 fame. What he’s learned, it seems, is how to strip away distractions, and let character become suspense, as well as destiny.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    Without any preachiness, this magically beautiful film urges us to take better care of the bees, and honor the irreplaceable things that they do for us.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    The surreal images, offbeat jokes and pointed human-rights allegory make this an altogether different experience from most American animation. It’s dreamy, poetic and not to be missed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    More likely to play well with older children, due to its split-up story line, Ocelot's creation is like nothing else they are likely to see animating the multiplex.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Much of the plot stretches credulity, but the way it's constructed keeps tension high.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Showing the personal toll that produces a star in any field could be a soggy, predictable drag, but the documentary A Man's Story never slides into easy sentiment or bromides.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Law in These Parts more than accomplishes its goal of provoking a discussion about imposing laws on people who have no say in making them.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The filmmaker doesn't speculate about why these men are talking, but he leaves you with an excellent guess.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    If Like Someone in Love frustrates, it also has ineffable grace in the framing of Kiarostami’s long, languid shots, the changes he captures in the light, and the way the actors’ smallest movements become fascinating. This enigmatic study of identities built on social deceit offers more than easy answers ever could.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The story is ornate but easy to follow. It's the dreamy look and sound of Tabu - half old, half modern - that give the film its haunting strangeness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    When Uprising shows masses of Arabs marching for freedom, and using Muslim prayer as a form of peaceful protest, that in itself is a bit revolutionary.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    What this means is that at times the pace of Beyond the Hills is nerve-wrackingly slow. But Mungiu has his own way of creating suspense, and he has a gift for making a known outcome as shocking as a twist.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Morales’ spin on the old ransom plot is fresher and more gripping than most big-budget Hollywood products.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    At age 76, Loach also decided to offer his characters, and audience, some hope — at the bottom of a glass.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Bhalla’s advocacy gets its force above all from the oddly similar personalities of the two main subjects — Wallace and Sumell — zealous reformers possessed of astonishing optimism, even as Bhalla closes by noting that there are 80,000 prisoners in solitary in the US.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The friction between a couple of still-struggling artists sounds rather depressing, but in fact the film is often funny; it shows that love is present in even the couple’s harshest exchanges.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Lenny Abrahamson’s latest film has its roots in the notorious death of a teenager outside a Dublin nightclub, later detailed in Kevin Power’s novel “Bad Day in Blackrock.” The pensive, gray-tinged What Richard Did unfolds this downbeat tale in long scenes, but seldom feels slow.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Philippe Béziat’s documentary focuses on how Sivadier and his Violetta, the French soprano Natalie Dessay, fuse acting with the music. It’s an incredible view of artists at work.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Like Father, Like Son has earned its right to reduce a person to a sobbing wreck.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    If The Past doesn’t equal the masterpiece that preceded it, it’s still an exceptional film from a man who is clearly one of the best working directors.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    There is something both mischievous and moving about a world-famous director who, closing on his 10th decade, designs a movie that celebrates his actors: their varying ages, their versatility, their heart.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    What makes the movie so delightful is that Wadjda isn’t trying to make trouble; she’s just being herself. A shot of the system of wire hangers attached to her radio so she can pick up Western music stations sums up her can-do attitude.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Panh’s technique achieves things a conventional documentary could not, as when he pans across dozens of the clay figures jumbled in a box, in a shot that calls up both the toys of childhood, and graves.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    It only seems plotless. Momentous things happen, one of them tele­graphed in a single heartbreaking shot. The sense of time and place is so intense that Jules’ way of life seems to be disappearing even as we watch him.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Nuclear Nation is likely to attract those who already oppose such power plants. But supporters should see it, too, if only to hear the opposition’s arguments. The film raises issues that aren’t going away.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Ida
    Both actresses are extraordinary, but Kulesza — bitter, sarcastic and tragic — carries the movie’s soul.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is the sort of movie that gets called “hallucinatory,” but it is strongly grounded in the New York in which 99 percent of us live. Fleischner gets his uncanny effects simply by showing what this city looks like to a child who has a different filter.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film fragments into an emotionally devastating parable about what enforced silence does to an artist.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Halle Berry’s latest vehicle is old-fashioned as a leisure suit, but better-looking and a lot more fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Meier's tight focus on her primary characters pays off: Seydoux brings a strong array of emotions to a highly unsympathetic part. And Klein, whether plugging his ears with cigarette filters or suddenly embracing a woman he barely knows, is heartbreaking.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    LUV
    Candis gets some wonderful performances from his impressive cast.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The evidence Jarecki amasses against the drug wars in The House I Live In is more than strong enough to withstand any excess rhetorical zeal.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Brooklyn Castle is an engaging tale, and the principal is wrong: These kids are much more lovable than the Yankees.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    These elisions give an odd feeling to a film so long in the making. Crewdson's work ultimately begins to seem less enigmatic than he is himself.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It's never dull though, and the familiar characters and stock motivations are convincingly put across. And there's always Xu, who's turned to acupuncture to suppress his empathy, as you wait for the inevitable moment when suppressing it won't be enough.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The conceit is slight, but Hong's playful structure conceals sharp observations about fantasies, communication, and how foreigners and natives interact.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    A groundbreaking, highly influential film, A Man Vanishes is a fiercely brilliant piece of work, but it's more intellectual challenge than pleasure.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The young, novice actors are charming, but they haven’t completely mastered the art of natural-sounding dialogue.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film thwarts any pat expectations you might glean from the town's bad economy and these checkered backgrounds. The teenagers are refreshingly gentle and clean-living; they don't drink, they don't swear and they certainly aren't having sex. All three are religious, a fact that is neither emphasized nor underplayed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In addition to the magnificent music, the movie takes its rumpled charm from Fry's unfeigned fanboy manner.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Not everyone will be in tune with the movie's sick sense of humor, although it's sometimes hilarious.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is both elegiac and amazingly retro, like the nature specials that baby boomers were weaned on - although it's not for animal lovers, unless you have a specific grudge against sables. "Happy People" is the title, but it's virtually all men.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In the poignant, symmetrical end, Touré leaves the idea that the real yearning of these people is for a fair shake in their own home.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Lore is the sort of movie you’d already expect to rip your heart out, but that doesn’t diminish the tragedy when it does arrive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The adventurous souls who stick with it, however, will find head-spinning images and a cumulative impact that does, in fact, amount to a story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is built from moving, frank interviews with survivors from two families who hid, speaking over and around extensive re-enactments. Passages from the memoir of one family matriarch, Esther Stermer, in many ways the heroine of the tale, also are used as narration.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a film heavily dependent on tone and atmosphere for its charm, the budding relationship shown through things like a lovely twilight bike ride down a hill to the shops below.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The bright palette of Reality is an obvious way to underline the hero’s unraveling, but it looks good, and it works.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    For a long while, director Benjamin Epps goes for breakneck farce; at its best, this is a batty mixture of family-values editorial and teen spoof.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Wall winds up as a captivating fable, an end-times scenario that’s more about the survival of the spirit than the body.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a sympathetic portrait of an artist whose heart lay more with new work than old glories, right up to the end.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    For those willing to lock into Reygadas’ mad wavelength, the beauty is worth the puzzlement.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s an entertaining melodrama of the old school that plays out with the clockwork inevitability of a “Columbo” episode.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    As pure comedy, it’s a hoot.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    A Touch of Sin is by no means subtle, but it is composed with a passion and sinuous grace that makes it far more effective than many other sincere message movies.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a truly interesting slasher fest; in this one, the heroine gets to be both beauty and beast.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film shows how quiet exteriors can mask deep interior lives, and how art feeds those lives. The view of art is richly intellectual, sometimes enthralling. But I confess, I liked Museum Hours best for answering a question I’ve always had: What is that guard thinking?
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a wispy movie that does not end so much as peter out, and it could have benefited from a little more humor and a little less heinous male behavior. Miller and Farahani, though — both sometimes used previously as decoration — give strong performances as women bonding over their delight in both movement and their own beauty.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie's most exciting when the precision and jaw-dropping nerve of the gang holds center stage.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Breakup at a Wedding works, because Quinaz has come up with a concept that lets him skewer directorial pretension alongside wedding hysteria.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Given that the opening shot shows the heroine on the toilet, what a nice surprise to find that this is a pure love story, told with elegance and simplicity on a low budget.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Darci Picoult’s script renders all of these characters, if not always sympathetically, humanly and fully.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In short, the crows are pests, but the movie shows them great affection, as do the humans who discuss the ways they must accommodate the crows. After a while it is impossible not to admire the birds’ intelligence and resilience, and see that perhaps it’s the other way around: The crows are the ones putting up with us.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The closing subtitle says that no one was ever prosecuted for this madness. The pure-archive approach leaves a taste of despair; civic governance, it seems, can’t even promise not to kill you.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Lanzmann, for his part, begins the interview with a sharp, probing manner; by the end, the filmmaker’s questions and body language are conveying something altogether different.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Hoogendijk ends the movie just before the museum reopens; but her last, soaring image is a stirring vision of what made all the agita worthwhile.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The way the tightrope works is vague, but what the exercise shows is straightforward and marvelous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Omar eventually becomes a sun-scorched neo-noir — and the fade-out is an unforgettable jolter.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are so many echoes of “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” that it starts to feel like a barely disguised sequel. But those reminders, and the rather trite journey-of-self plot, are just decoration. This tender film works to remind us of how much we still love Deneuve, and succeeds in scene after scene.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    John Maloof’s documentary has an opening both apt and witty: Talking heads, one after the other, struck dumb by the mystery at hand.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The results are remarkably intelligent and entertaining, even for someone who (like this writer) finds Cave’s music rather dirge-like.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film’s reckoning, when it comes, is fully as heartbreaking as it should be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    A remarkable attempt to portray what might turn soccer-playing boys into fanatical murderers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Directors Matthew Pond and Kirk Marcolina wisely keep this unrepentant charmer, in her 80s during filming, on-camera, save for when they’re interviewing fascinated writers and fed-up prosecutors.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Less tiring than a three-hour tramp through the halls, and considerably less expensive than a plane ticket, National Gallery gives the feeling of having seen everything there is to see.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Swift and often compelling, it’s also blessedly unbiased.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In Devos’ hard-charging performance, she’s also fascinating, and that’s all a film requires.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie reveals some of the most stunning landscape cinematography imaginable, while everyone on the isolated ship waxes philosophical — as who would not?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Terry’s talent is so magical that you may wish there were longer snippets of his playing. Still, this is a wonderful portrait of two artists strengthened by friendship.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Soviet era is more interesting than the NHL years, but still, the film is entertaining even for ardent nonfans.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Eerie and utterly riveting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    We know Paris never went anywhere, and the film’s a little too flashy and theatrical, with too-neat ironies. As a duel between acting talents, though, this is first-rate.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    In a way, this marvelous movie does show that the Mekons have declined, because they’ve become the one thing punk rockers never ever want to be: lovable.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s endearing how this glorified haunted-house movie tries to reclaim all the old tools, and do so with a straight face and a PG-13 level of violence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Ava DuVernay, in showing Ruby's life in waiting, occasionally lets the pace slip into tedium.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    A Royal Affair is basically a good-looking set of historical Cliffs Notes. There, is however, one excellent reason to see it: Folsgaard, who by the end has made his betrayed and bereft Christian into a figure of genuine tragedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The Other Son is played with warmth and conviction by its cast. But it's also a little pat and toothless, set in an Israel where not even the notorious border crossings seem that difficult.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Things go awry in the last act, as the movie stops dead for more songs and a tragic coda that seems forced and trite, rather than the three-hankie finale we've all earned. Still, Cumming is wonderful.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Some of the film's flourishes are ill-judged.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Somehow, mostly through the impassioned performances of its young actors, the film finds its footing in the third act, as the narration goes quiet and tragedy unfolds with precision, even elegance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This enigma-delivery system from a sharp mind has enthralling moments but becomes a bit enervating in its self-seriousness. By the end, the whole thing feels more academic than mind-bending.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Oddly, though, for a film so dedicated to celebrating what he can still accomplish, his early performing career gets a lot more emphasis than the music still being composed. And that's a pity, because what little we hear is entrancing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    When The Last Gladiators treats brawls like greatest-hits clips for more than half the movie, then suggests fighting is behind Nilan's decline, it feels like trying to have it both ways.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    11 Flowers boils down to a coming-of-age tale merged with a why-dunit — not unlike “To Kill a Mockingbird” — but the plot is molasses-slow, as threads are dropped, picked up and dropped again.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sex is the main thing that makes Kiss of the Damned worthwhile.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a brief movie, and perhaps all that preamble is meant to justify the ticket price. The best advice is to walk in about 25 minutes after the lights go down. You’ll still get all the laughs, and you won’t have to hear about Hart’s YouTube hits.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The biographical bits soon feel like a distraction from the music, performed by Gavilán. It’s heard often, but not often enough. Judging by the movie, Parra’s songs are fiery and haunting, sometimes sensuous, sometimes bleak. When Parra sings, the movie becomes worthwhile.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot doesn’t entirely escape formula, and the ending is jagged and forced, unable to commit to either hope or gloom. But for at least part of its length, My Brother the Devil brings refreshing changes to a genre badly in need of them.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is no masterpiece, but neither is it a disaster. In its steady great-books way, the film is often truthful and moving.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    At nearly three hours, it’s entirely too long, needlessly padded out with an intrusive interview-framing device.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Time has robbed Blume’s subjects of shock value, but her perceptiveness hasn’t dimmed. The movie’s sincerity carries it along, and makes this story endearing despite its filmmaking clichés.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winocour skillfully films Augustine being exhibited for other doctors in several disturbingly erotic scenes, but elsewhere Soko’s stolid, one-note demeanor takes a toll. The script, which gives Augustine no background and mostly shows her either being “treated” or having an episode, doesn’t help.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s involving, as biopics go, but the shattering debates that still swirl around Arendt’s view of the Holocaust are relegated to walk-ons.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    If the movie has a star, it may be cinematographer Oleg Mutu, the Romanian who lensed “The Death of Mr. Lazarescu” and “4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days.” Even when the pace wanes, the images are still gripping.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sincerity and simplicity of the film, however, lift it somewhat above the ordinary run.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This film is best when arguing that drugs should be treated as a multibillion-dollar commodity business in need of regulation, and not as a moral failing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Europe’s immigration dilemma was also the focus of Aki Kaurismaki’s winsome “Le Havre,” and the Africans themselves were front and center in Moussa Touré’s “La Pirogue.” This film is somewhat less effective; Crialese’s message seems to take priority over a deeper sense of individuals.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The final scenes, when Mancini meets Kim’s son, have the awkward feel of an “Oprah” episode, with the editing and music suggesting a catharsis that isn’t always backed up by what’s on-screen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a baggy movie, with some things (such as whether Idris taking Ritalin in high school improved his performance) unexplained, and it may appeal most to those raising kids themselves.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    By refusing to consider that Dickens and Ternan ever brought each other any happiness, the movie is more Victorian in its attitudes than even some Victorians were.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The firefights and chase scenes, no matter how much they adhere to genre, seem more real than the people trapped in the corruption.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is a handsome movie, rich in period detail, but the stately pace slows to a crawl in the second half.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is, by some distance, the best movie of the three, and it showcases the impeccable symmetry of his compositions, while retaining his compulsion to wag a finger in your face.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Technically, the film isn’t terribly exciting: talking heads interspersed with shots of young people making their symbolic “leap of faith” from the walls. But the directors have chosen eloquent interviewees, and the passionate attachment they feel for their city gives the film heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The story is something of a trap: Both irresistibly poignant and an invitation to wallow.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    In terms of its outlook for young girls in Georgia, the movie title might as well be “Buried Alive.”
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Though the filmmaking is not terribly exciting, Fela’s life and music are.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Mumblecore founding father Joe Swanberg is back with this amiable off-season tale of Chicago millennials and their dissatisfactions. It offers his characteristic you-are-there visuals, rackety sound and meandering dialogue, often with appealing results.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Saint Laurent was known for an almost monk-like focus on his work. And so this film springs to life — the actors, the camera, the editing — when we see his creations the way they were meant to be seen: in motion, and worn by beautiful women.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a simplicity and directness in Chaplin of the Mountains that keeps it aloft; its wholehearted sincerity feels much fresher than any number of slicker, more cynical films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The conclusion feels too good-natured after nearly two hours of a minister who would need typed instructions to butter a baguette.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a swift, vivid movie, but 10 years past the scandal, not much is new.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Its sentiment is appealing, though, and its sincerity doesn’t cloy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is passionate, but not exactly revelatory.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    An explosion of images, mixing seedy, hand-held reality with groovy grindhouse imitations. Most of the shots are vivid, some are even thrilling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Jealousy has a quiet melancholy that’s very pleasing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Brief and timely, this documentary directed by Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia is also frustrating.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Filmed on abstract sets, it’s full of playful touches, such as lines delivered in front of a screen that looks like a comic-strip panel, and glimpses of a mole puppet popping out from a fake lawn.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Played with enormous charm by Samuel Lange Zambrano, Junior is a handsome kid.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gorgeous surroundings don't make up for sulky, feuding travel companions.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    These characters, especially the uninteresting primary couple, can't sustain almost two hours of movie. Overall, BearCity 2 deals in mild amusement, not wit.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The results are too predictable.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Coming Up Roses swerves into a third-act twist that's both an indie cliché and dramatically unnecessary.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The performances are so uniformly good that it's a shame the characters are stuck with such a listless plot.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The stalker-enabling menace of Facebook is largely abandoned by midpoint, and Brief Reunion won't even prompt most people to change their privacy settings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film keeps its focus small, but the trouble is, the characters' emotions stay that way, too.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The next time Siddig plays a man of intrigue, let’s hope he’s chasing something more interesting than a clueless kid.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    By the movie’s end, the party guests may be ready to dance the hora — or they may find themselves sitting this one out. “Hava” will have its revenge, however: It’s still stuck in my head.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    At its best, Shanghai Calling is mildly diverting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Baran bo Odar puts all this in the service of ghastly clichés. The rape of children has long since grown nauseatingly familiar, in books, in films, in each season of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Most of the humor, though, is wan, exemplified by letters like “Dear General Lee: Sounds great! Please proceed with your plan.”
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Toward the end, despite the wintry script and chilly acting, some emotion begins to break through. But it’s never a good sign when the art direction offers more fascination than the sex.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gould’s lugubrious presence is always welcome, and Rue plays her lovelorn part with verve.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a good cinephile heart beating under this fluffy story. But Lellouche, in making her homage to Allen, left out one of his essential qualities: bite. Paris-Manhattan drifts by and never leaves a single toothmark.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Detour does a fine job of giving drivers yet another reason to stress out, but that anxiety doesn’t extend to its hero’s fate.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a compelling story, and Minac has told it before, notably in 2002’s “The Power of Good: Nicholas Winton.” This new documentary seems aimed at a classroom audience.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The debut film of Brandon Cronenberg deals out shivers and flinches in little hypodermic jabs.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Despite a remarkable performance by Suliman, who’s almost never off-camera, events become increasingly pat and implausible, with one explanatory scene played like a shadowy variation on Kevin Spacey’s monologue in “Se7en.”
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Farahani determinedly underplays her character, and is often very touching. But while there is a satisfying final scene, The Patience Stone is essentially a monologue, and Atiq Rahimi (directing the adaptation of his own novel) doesn’t have what it takes to make the story more dynamic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    If anyone in the store’s history ever had a bad experience there, you won’t find it in this movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Trouble is, while the social milieu is nicely realized, other parts of the drama are not. Too often Burshtein cuts off a scene prematurely, darting away just as the crucial moment of emotion or confrontation appears.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Lifetime movies have their pleasures, and so does this film. Chief among them is the cast, a group of over-45 actresses who really are better than ever; in the cases of Brooke Shields and Daryl Hannah, remarkably better.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The main problem is the criminal subplot, full of Aussie villains snarling “mate” at one another and landing bloodless punches on Dean. 33 Postcards is what happens when someone grafts a prison angle onto “Pollyanna” — the tough guys just get in the way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are a handful of moments to entrance a non-fan. When the musicians and singers assemble to sing “Proserpina,” the last song McGarrigle ever wrote, with its haunting refrain (“Come home to Mama”), the effect is transcendent.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Ultimately, this film reveals the Israeli self-image, but not much more. The people with the cameras pass by Arab neighbors, and what the Palestinians’ home movies might look like remains unexplored.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    As reactions to budding sexuality go, it’s a little extreme. And it’s also contrived; Isabelle’s decision never makes any emotional, let alone logical, sense.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Winter hits his stride detailing how the music bigwigs hung Napster out to dry, but couldn’t do a thing about their industry’s permanently altered business model. This exercise in recent nostalgia (the original Napster went bust in 2002) might have been better if the tart cynicism of that section had shown up earlier.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The two leads spend a lot of their time doing static interviews, in a format familiar from TV shows like “The Office.” This glorified narration gets old, fast.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie was largely improvised, which lends itself more to scenes than a feature-length film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beck expressed dismay that “Pimp” was taken as a glamorization of his life, and not a warning. By omitting the experiences of the women who worked for him, the filmmakers risk the same thing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Cardinale’s few brief scenes are the ones with the most depth; her facial lines really did come along with some wisdom.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Una Noche is intriguing enough, however, to make you hope that both Mulloy and her actors are heard from again, sooner rather than later.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The tone teeters between delicate and affected, and there’s only so much flitting around and soulful stares a movie can sustain before an audience starts wanting something more earthbound.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The second half is therefore much more interesting than the first; even so, the whole movie suffers from a lack of narrative momentum and a surfeit of wordless shots of men exchanging deep, meaningful glances.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The New Black often feels like a polished but uninspired op-ed.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a mildly interesting thriller — Paris through the eyes of a director who doesn’t know how to make its beauty menacing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a slickly plotted ticking-time-bomb thriller with a crisp look and one standout debut performance, by Hitham Omari as a ruthless leader of a terrorist cell.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The filmmaking style is practically nonexistent: interviews and static shots of the performers onstage. They are thoughtful and often funny, especially Mat Fraser, a British man whose arms were damaged by Thalidomide, and Julia Atlas Muz, the off-stage partner with whom he often performs.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The densely plotted Generation War sweeps past implausibilities and offers the can’t-put-it-down qualities of a superior airport novel; its last third is affecting. But a bold confrontation with the past? Not so much.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Pretty and pleasing, but no more. A bon-bon, not a meal.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Directors Aron Gaudet and Gita Pullapilly overload their too-long film with subplots. Yet the actors — including a terrific Aiden Gillen (“Game of Thrones”) as Casper’s no-good father — perform as though unaware that any of this is a cliché.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    More a tribute to youth and its discontents than a fresh exploration.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The photographs on view are dazzling; the way they are shown here is somewhat less so.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The cast, so packed with talent that Jean Reno and Cherry Jones barely register, is stuck with stagey dialogue. Juliet Rylance, in the Nina part, has a particularly hard time. But there are good points, including Janney’s obvious pleasure in her part.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The single theme is “Isn’t this cool?” And if your response is, “Well, it’s certainly loud,” then On Any Sunday probably isn’t for you.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    It's deeply frustrating to discover that this 2012 movie has precisely the same concerns as the ["The Women"] - appearance and men - with raunchy frankness about sex added and every trace of real wit siphoned out.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Aside from an additional 30 minutes or so of plot, Trade of Innocents offers no more than a middling episode of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot, however, comes with twists you can spot as far off as a Himalayan peak. The dialogue is heavily expository, and the actors are not up to the task of breathing life into characters meant to symbolize the Spirit of the Afghan People or the Nature of Evil.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The plot is predictable, as complications line up like jets awaiting takeoff. Even the camera work is predictable: The attractive-girl's-scary-boyfriend-suddenly-pops-up shot; the morning-after, face-in-the-pillow shot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    What you get instead of soccer is almost two hours of late-stage syphilis.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Allegiance works better as a way of reminding us who does the fighting in this age of outsourcing than it does as a human drama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The director has cited "Inglourious Basterds" as paving the way for his own movie; but for all his boldness, Quentin Tarantino avoided the camps altogether. My Best Enemy shows the camps only briefly, but once it does, it becomes both too much, and not enough. Once you see even a long shot of such a place, the impulse to find humor in much of anything is gone.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is like an hour and a half listening to someone bellyache about her landlord.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Part of the limp-rag ambience is due to Talt, who seems to be channeling Sarah Jessica Parker — which, unsurprisingly, does not work. Mostly it’s due to the script, which fails to meet the major romantic-comedy requirement of being clever about keeping lovers apart. All by itself, “The hero is kind of a drip” doesn’t cut it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The last topic is the hook for audience members not related to Gregory or Kleine, but just as insight appears, back we go to Kleine's tediously selfreferential narration.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Copperhead has a more accurate period look, but dramatically it’s inert.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Give director Paul Borghese credit for daring in giving his movie a title that evokes Sergio Leone’s two most famous epics. The trouble with doing that, of course, is that you better be prepared to deliver a movie on the same level.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The real unflinching truth is that an average newspaper reporter can do a more artful, compassionate job with a drug-war story than this movie does.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Big Star’s fans are so passionate that this film may well please some of them, but as for myself, I already knew their music was genius. By the end, I was muttering at every critic and musician and record producer, “Guys, tell me something I don’t know.”
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The best compensation for sitting through this silliness is Alice Taglioni as the primary cop.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Here’s a movie that will test the limits of your ability to watch other people having a good time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are some bright one-liners in the beginning, but the comedy/drama mix is an uneasy one, especially considering the shabby way the film treats McKenna, as a tart who’s just there to improve some yuppie sex lives.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Full of appealing actors mugging like crazy, it’s got amusing moments, but the overstuffed visuals suffocate real emotion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    This morbid, cruel movie seems leached of all things that might inadvertently give viewers pleasure.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Now, here’s the trilogy’s second installment, in which the jolly Austrian makes it clear that women of a certain age do not have his permission to overdo it with religion, either.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Colin Firth plays a real-life investigator whom the script renders as noble as Atticus Finch. Reese Witherspoon does haunting work as a victim’s mom. But the stately pace and the faultless art direction add to the impression that truth was not only stranger, but more dramatic.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s all terribly talky and low-energy; that wonderful noirish title, it turns out, was just a front for a history lecture.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Consistently stale but not altogether unpleasant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is full of baffling choices, like the EKG machine that beeps for the first 40 minutes, so loud and so maddening that the great words barely register. Mumblecore is not a good look for Ibsen.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Eckhart’s another matter. He’s adequate, but there is something about his raspy voice and WASPy body language that’s more in tune with being the bad guy at the board meeting than the hero racing through the train station.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Clip hurts your eyes, but if it’s supposed to hurt your heart, it misses the mark.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s not a documentary, it isn’t entertainment, and aside from Chung’s intelligent, dignified performance, this sure as heck isn’t art.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Seidl sternly rejects nuance. All the women are crude and insensitive, all the men are desperate and exploited. Despite copious full-frontal nudity, it’s an unrelievedly puritanical and didactic film.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s a scrappy, unpretentious movie, with nicely calibrated pacing, but there’s no logic, little motivation and above all, no personalities.
    • 9 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    It is a remarkably unattractive-looking movie. I don’t know when people voted that the seasick look of an iPhone video is now a desirable style.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Set in the drab suburbs of Paris, The Stroller Strategy doesn’t even offer pretty backdrops.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    First Comes Love seems punishingly long. It’s no more visually arresting than anybody else’s home movies, and the film’s creator fails to connect her subset of Manhattan privilege to anyone or anything other than herself.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    A movie about bisexuals sounds fresh and fun on paper, but a sensitive acoustic song under the opening credits shows exactly where The Happy Sad is going. Deadly earnestness and sex don’t mix well at the movies.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Director Annette Haywood-Carter films the proceedings with a sepia-tinged prettiness, but this is a Southern “Downton Abbey,” minus the loopy plot turns and wisecracks that make that series so addictive.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    The most distressing bad choice in CBGB, a movie entirely composed from them, is that those brilliant songs are repurposed studio recordings.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Juliette Binoche, as Claudel, is occasionally touching, but as soon as interest flares, the movie suffocates it via endless takes of her suffering through daily chores.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    Carl Kranz, as a possibly autistic boy enamored of Natalia, offers his scenes some heart. But Soft in the Head is drab, ramshackle stuff — up in everyone’s face, and finding very little there.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 12 Farran Smith Nehme
    Molly’s Theory of Relativity is anti-cinema. All hope for any plot atrophies as Molly and her husband discuss their possible move to Norway with the wit and passion of a representative reading a tribute to Calvin Coolidge into the Congressional Record.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 0 Farran Smith Nehme
    So unspeakably dull that it can’t even offend, save when the filmmakers have the almighty nerve to quote Alfred Hitchcock and Jonathan Demme. It would be far better to rip off a William Castle movie, and aim for a level they have a prayer of actually hitting.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 0 Farran Smith Nehme
    Sirius requires a religious faith in the notion that the same government that can barely get it together to raise the debt ceiling can suppress all evidence of aliens, via means such as engineering 9/11 as a distraction when Greer got too close to proving his case.

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