For 240 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Gene Siskel's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back
Lowest review score: 0 Friday the 13th
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 31 out of 240
240 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Gene Siskel
    The crosscultural action picture might have worked if the filmmakers had come up with a script in which Douglas' character had been rendered weak and confused by being a fish trying to swim in strange waters. But instead he is presented as a traditional action hero dominating everyone in sight. The cultural imperialism of that decision makes for a routine and frequently offensive story full of Asian stereotypes. Director Scott (Blade Runner, Alien) certainly knows how to photograph arresting architecture, but the high-gloss look of Black Rain only intensifies the shortcomings of the pedestrian story.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Gene Siskel
    What's so funny about Down and Out In Beverly Hills is not its moral imperative to appreciate life's simple, enduring pleasures. True, we get that message, and we appreciate it, but we already know that motto even if we don't live by it. No, what's funny is director Mazursky's extraordinarily fine eye and ear for capturing the way the wealthy residents of Beverly Hills walk, talk, dress and think.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Gene Siskel
    A joy to behold, a complex film that never loses either its sense of purpose or sense of humor. [7 February 1986, Friday, p.33]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Gene Siskel
    Gary Busey, Robbie Robertson, and Jodi Foster star in a romantic triangle about some carnival sharpies and a runaway girl. A beautiful portrait of the carnival as an American institution. [18 July 1980, p.8]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Gene Siskel
    Bruce Willis' film debut should prove to be a disappointment for Moonlighting fans, because the script he has been given here does not compare to the elaborate material he has worked with on some episodes of the TV show. Willis plays a business man who winds up falling in love with a woman (Kim Basinger) who goes crazy every time she has a drink. Director Blake Edwards (10) does not distinguish himself with this exercise in nonstop slapstick, and the performances of both Willis and Basinger are lost amid the rubble. [08 May 1987, p.C7]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Gene Siskel
    Raiders of the Lost Ark is, in fact, about as entertaining as a commercial movie can be. What is it? An adventure film that plays like an old-time 12-part serial that you see all at once, instead of Saturday-to-Saturday. It's a modern "Thief of Baghdad." It's the kind of movie that first got you excited about movies when you were a kid.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    A problem with Schrader's script is that he too slavishly follows the Taxi Driver outline, needlessly giving a violent conclusion to Light Sleeper. We sit there noting the resemblance to the 1975 movie more than being absorbed into the drama. Nonetheless, Light Sleeper is emblematic of an era, and is recommended on that basis and on the excellent quality of it acting. We remember the character more than we believe the machinations they've run through.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Gene Siskel
    Silverado is a completely successful physical attempt at reviving the western, but its script would need a complete rewrite for it to become more than just a small step in a full-scale western revival. [10 Jul 1985, p.5]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Gene Siskel
    Individual scenes work, but the movie seems overstuffed-why is the Harris character necessary-and halting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Gene Siskel
    It's a superb, thoughtful drama that doesn't claim to be a documentary and shouldn't be judged as such. [22 Dec 1995, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    F/X
    F/X turns into a dazzling series of deceptions that border on being so topsy-turvy that one almost becomes frustrated with being fooled. But the script of Robert T. Megginson and Gregory Fleeman managed to stay on the right side of credibility and good humor enough of the time so that some rather obvious plot holes can be forgiven.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Gene Siskel
    The Money Pit, a miserable ripoff of the old Cary Grant comedy Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, has nothing to do with such nuances of the human experience. Instead, it is an action comedy that regularly throws its actors around and through pieces of plywood, into and out of windows.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    As entertaining as The Goonies finally becomes--and its last hour is mostly one pleasure after another--it's a shame that Spielberg, writer Chris Columbus and director Richard Donner felt the need to take the low road in terms of language. [7 Jun 1985, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    What no plot summary of Darkman can provide is how much director Raimi ("The Evil Dead") brings to the party. In addition to giving us a conflicted hero - more disturbed than Batman - Raimi fills every action sequence and even routine plot scenes with fresh images that reflect his Darkman's rage. [24 Aug. 1990]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    My only major criticism of Cocoon is the ending, which needlessly places the film in familiar extraterrestrial movie territory. Without giving too much away, either most of the characters should have made a different decision or the film should have had courage to jump off into a completely different direction. Special visual effects are wonderful, but the human being is still the greatest special effect of all.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Gene Siskel
    As much as I admire the work of both (Roman) Polanski and (Jack) Nicholson, I found Chinatown tedious from beginning to just before the end. [15 July 1974]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Gene Siskel
    An upbeat, thoroughly entertaining street film about an entertainment revolution in the depressed South Bronx, featuring break dancing, graffiti art and record mixing. A black and Puerto Rican version of Saturday Night Fever. [08 June 1984, p.12]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Gene Siskel
    One of those rare films that communicates the exquisite joy of the moviemaking process. [7 October 1994, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Gene Siskel
    Sarandon delivers one of her very best performances; her shock at encountering the wrath of the victim's family is registered beautifully. And Sean Penn, who for too long has suffered with the label of being a "bad boy," gives an Oscar-caliber performance.[12 January 1996, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    What this movie is about, and where it succeeds best, is the primordial level of fear. The characters, for the most part, and the non-fish elements in the story, are comparatively weak and not believable. [20 June 1975]
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    A pleasing but overlong version of the Rocky story told through the character of a put-upon young high school student who learns karate from an old Japanese master to vanquish the local school bullies. There is no reason this simple story should run 2 hours and 10 minutes. Such a running time strains the good will generated by a cast full of likable performances. [22 June 1984, p.12]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    Chuck Norris takes a big leap in his film career with Code of Silence, a solid cops 'n' drug dealers picture filmed last year in Chicago. Norris' big step is that this time he stars in a much more realistic action film, one with a credibility only slightly undone by a few of his martial arts maneuvers at the end.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    Part III has the more adult emotions of the original, and with the presence of Steenburgen it recalls the quality of her other fine time-travel romance, "Time After Time." [25 May 1990, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Gene Siskel
    The stunt work and special effects are top flight; Schwarzenegger and the kid are just fine, but we can't help but want this film to stop kidding around and thrill us. [18 Jun 1993, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Gene Siskel
    A truly stupid film based on what should have been a surefire hit - a cross-country car race. Too many stars spoil the action, including Burt Reynolds, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. [19 June 1981, p.2-8]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Gene Siskel
    Griffith gives the fullest performance of her career; Weaver, the most likable, even though she's the villain of the piece. Michael Nichols directs his best film in years. [23 Dec 1988, Friday, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Gene Siskel
    Yet another disappointing summer sequel, Lethal Weapon 2, with Danny Glover and Mel Gibson reprising their cop-buddy roles in pursuit of South African drug lords. [7 Jul 1989, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Gene Siskel
    Greenaway is a unique filmmaker in that he layers images upon one another in a single frame and doesn't require dialogue to make his films arresting. [18 Jul 1997]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Gene Siskel
    With Sean Connery as Agent 007, James Bond was a human-scale figure, an exceedingly cool guy to be sure, but a guy nonetheless. With Roger Moore as Bond, we are simply watching a lightweight actor stroll through a role.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Gene Siskel
    Richard Pryor is a scream as a wrongly accused bank robber. Gene Wilder is just so-so as his partner. [19 June 1981]
    • Chicago Tribune

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