Geoff Berkshire

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For 128 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Geoff Berkshire's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 100 Gleason
Lowest review score: 10 Septic Man
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 43 out of 128
  2. Negative: 36 out of 128
128 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Geoff Berkshire
    Tweel masterfully assembles roughly four years of footage, much of it shot by Gleason himself, and the result is painfully raw at times but undeniably rewarding.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 90 Geoff Berkshire
    Blending smart fantasy elements, broad comedy, tender romance and an atypically slow-burning apocalypse, the directorial debut of “I Heart Huckabees” co-writer Jeff Baena is charming, thoughtful and laugh-out-loud funny.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Geoff Berkshire
    The Internet’s Own Boy is a beautifully crafted film that opens a window on a world not everyone has entered yet, and exposes ways in which both the legal system and the U.S. government is lagging hopelessly behind technology.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Geoff Berkshire
    Narco Cultura is as overwhelming as it is absorbing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Geoff Berkshire
    The script is executed with enough naturalism to ward off complaints of contrivance — all the way up to a tidy, but quite satisfying, denouement.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Geoff Berkshire
    Comedian and actor Kumail Nanjiani and writer Emily V. Gordon mine their personal history for laughs, heartache, and hard-earned insight in The Big Sick, a film that’s by turns romantic, rueful, and hilarious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Geoff Berkshire
    Boasting spectacular performances from Duplass and Elisabeth Moss as a husband and wife on the brink of separation, this incredibly assured directorial debut of Charlie McDowell essentially turns the idea of a two-hander upside down and inside out.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Geoff Berkshire
    Without any fuss, Lipitz has made a film deeply rooted in intergenerational relationships between women.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    Swanberg and co-writer Megan Mercier have crafted an incredibly generous film that wears its heart on its sleeve but never feels sappy or even sentimental.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    Although limited in scope, the feature documentary debut of TV news veteran Cary Bell benefits greatly from the infectious personality of its subject, Abigail Evans.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    Writer-director Jim Strouse (“Grace Is Gone,” “The Winning Season”) places Williams at the center of a thoroughly conventional indie narrative — trusting his star’s sensibility to freshen up otherwise stale scenarios. Fortunately, Williams delivers on every count.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    Even in moments that don’t ring entirely true, Boyega’s grounded performance keeps the film headed in the right direction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    This character-driven picture takes its time marinating in quiet conversations and Austin atmosphere, making the sudden jolts of violence all the more shocking when they land.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    Page is simply superb in a complex role that perfectly plays to her gift for balancing deadpan comedy with surprisingly deep emotional reserves.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    It’s not necessarily artful, but it’s also never less than compelling. If anything, Soechtig has only refined her skills at packaging a slick, audience-friendly documentary with a subject that feels even more urgent.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    This disarming pic navigates tricky emotional territory to emerge as an impressive feature debut for helmer Jen McGowan and scribe Amy Lowe Starbin.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Geoff Berkshire
    Rather than milking the outre premise for broad comedy, everyone involved strives to keep the characters and situations grounded and warm.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    The Book of Life is undoubtedly stuffed with more business than its fleet, kid-friendly running time can properly handle. Yet Gutierrez’s confident delivery of the material remains so buoyant and passionately felt throughout that he almost gets away with it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    An exercise in hero worship that doesn’t shy away from its subject’s least admirable traits, “Being Evel” attempts to deliver a complex portrait of a man who preferred to be seen as a self-styled myth
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    A promising and impressively self-assured debut for 23-year-old filmmaker Miles Joris-Peyrafitte, As You Are is crafted with the confidence and skill of a veteran, but also the youthful eye of someone not far removed from his protagonists.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    An unusual movie like Buster’s Mal Heart demands an unusual star, and Rami Malek proves an ideal fit for Sarah Adina Smith’s sophomore feature.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    The film’s strongest assets are undoubtedly its actors.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Part teen romance, part awkward love triangle, part generational-clash portrait, and almost all powered by nostalgia, this warmly conceived dramedy will likely resonate strongest with audiences who have a direct connection to the story’s place and time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Beyond the Lights is a strange beast, a music-industry romance that alternates freely between wisdom and mawkishness, caustic entertainment-biz critique and naive wish fulfillment, heartfelt flourishes and soap-opera shenanigans.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    A thoughtful, detailed chronicle of the Fed’s origins, responsibilities and shifting monetary policies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    [A] fascinating but only intermittently insightful film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    The non-pro cast received their scenes one week at a time, and the choice lends their performances a compelling blend of discovery and authenticity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Silver offers up a generally assured and compelling film here.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    The Overnight invites the audience to keep guessing exactly who is seducing whom, and exactly where the temptations will lead, right up to its final few beats. Barely hitting 70 minutes before the credit crawl, this comedy successfully achieves a climax of its own that is equal parts exciting and frustrating.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Filmmakers Josh Kriegman (a former Weiner aide) and Elyse Steinberg utilize their seemingly unfettered access to deliver a rollicking and never-dull insider’s view of a political campaign in crisis mode, but the most fascinating questions surrounding Weiner’s epic fall remain unanswered.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    A formulaic and functional documentary that nevertheless proves effective at getting the message out about America’s addiction to unhealthy food.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Blissfully swimming against the hyperactive kidpic tide, Dolphin Tale 2 gently peddles inspirational life lessons while respecting both its characters and its audience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    First-time writer-director (and also star) Michelle Morgan brings just enough specificity, and a surprisingly sharp eye, to make the film an interesting calling card for future work.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    A trek across the Himalayas to raise climate-change awareness is respectfully packaged as inspirational comfort food in Pad Yatra: A Green Odyssey.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    After an hour or so spent establishing characters worth caring about, the narrative starts to devolve, and the more the film circles back to the mythology of “Ouija,” the sillier it gets. Much like the characters at its center, this prequel can’t outrun the ghosts of its past.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Grim, gritty and ultra-violent, Dredd reinstates the somber brutality missing from the U.K. comicbook icon's previous screen outing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Veteran filmmaker Greg MacGillivray (“Everest”) seizes the opportunity with striking imagery, which goes a long way toward compensating for his frequently over-earnest messaging.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    The directorial debut of visual artist Corin Hardy is never less than arresting to the eye, but thin characters and a familiar story hold this Irish chiller back from entering the top tier of recent horror entries.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Eschews hysteria, preachiness and self-importance in favor of calm, persuasive scientific arguments.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    The breezily likable pic benefits from an underexposed topic and solid execution.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    Siegel’s likable perf keeps the audience on her side and highlights Maddie’s knack for thinking on her feet. Gallagher is even better as the mysteriously motivated antagonist.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    This is neither an indictment nor an endorsement but simply a refreshing departure from the combative tone of contemporary politics and political coverage.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Geoff Berkshire
    American Promise succeeds in touching on a wealth of subjects without overreaching.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Geoff Berkshire
    Take Me to the River compensates for a lack of originality and depth with no shortage of joyful celebration.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Geoff Berkshire
    Brightest Star, has all the trappings of a contemporary romantic comedy, but also the good sense to strive for a deeper examination of a young man’s search for his place in the universe.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Geoff Berkshire
    Although Captive largely succeeds as a two-hander, it stumbles in the minimal attempts to broaden the scope beyond Smith and Nichols’ time together.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Geoff Berkshire
    Headland demonstrated little interest in playing it safe with her previous film... But here she reins in that impulse almost too much, and Sleeping With Other People winds up both looking (with its adequate but unremarkable tech package) and often feeling like a run-of-the-mill studio comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Geoff Berkshire
    Even as some of the supporting players and subplots veer toward caricature, the family dynamics at the film’s center remain entirely relatable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Geoff Berkshire
    The film’s haphazard focus muddies the waters without doing anything to clarify the overall stakes. Fortunately, the continual visual splendors make a rather striking argument of their own.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Geoff Berkshire
    Solid performances and some genuinely sharp humor elevate writer-director Rob Burnett’s second feature.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    The sophomore effort from Jake Paltrow (“The Good Night”) gets so bogged down in its primal tale of murder and revenge that the most intriguing elements become little more than futuristic window dressing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    Exceedingly stylish and ultimately quite silly, The Signal is a sci-fi head trip better appreciated for the journey than the destination.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    Even if first-time writer-director Wayne Roberts is sympathetic to the plight he’s chosen for the protagonist, his film never burrows deep enough under her skin to make the string of miserable scenarios connect in a meaningful way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    +1
    Carefully repeated imagery, in-camera tricks and well-executed fx combine to create a tantalizing visual puzzle that demands full attention, even as the flavorless characters and largely so-so performances risk audience indifference.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    A ho-hum exorcism chiller that tries to spice up a formulaic screenplay by converting a predominantly Catholic-fixated horror subgenre to Judaism.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    A bittersweet ending offers both victory and defeat, but closes on a note of hard-won optimism.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    This is the kind of movie where a major development in a character’s personal life instantly telegraphs his ultimate fate in the trenches.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    The intense focus on the two lead characters emerges as both a strength and a weakness. There’s a lot of walking and talking, and what begins as rather charming ultimately turns tedious, even with a fleet 80-minute running time before closing credits factor in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    Even if every word of Coogler’s account of the last day in Grant’s life held up under close scrutiny, the film would still ring false in its relentlessly positive portrayal of its subject.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    Even with a bona fide icon at its center, The Comedian doesn’t dig deep enough to add anything substantial to the subgenre.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    Unfortunately, Drunktown’s Finest too often suffers from stilted performances and scripting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    For much of the running time, The Midnight Swim is effectively ambiguous, but Smith’s decision to play coy with the sisters’ backstories eventually frustrates.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    While the filmed stage performances are among the pic’s most galvanizing sequences, their inclusion underscores how flat Gibney’s combination of archival footage and talking-head interviews otherwise plays.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    The lovingly crafted documentary Why We Ride ultimately chokes on the fumes of bombastic self-seriousness.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    The ensemble’s crack comic timing can only go so far to compensate for uneven scripting.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    The Land feels a few drafts away from succeeding on its own terms. Still, there’s enough on screen, beyond Lendeborg’s confident star turn, to label Caple as a filmmaker to watch.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    Joshy offers a strange mix of elements that never quite add up.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    An alternately enchanting and exhausting anime adventure in which cutesy characters and peppy vocal turns belie a darker, angst-ridden narrative.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Geoff Berkshire
    Watching an estimable quintet of character actors do their thing is the chief pleasure of Cut Bank.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    The part may be tailor-made for Simmons’ no-nonsense persona, and his performance reliably rock solid, but the bland execution of director Gavin Wiesen and the uninspired scripting of Seth Owen have no comic zing.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Tawdry but cripplingly self-serious, the second feature from Mora Stephens (a full decade after her little-seen, also politically themed debut “Conventioneers”) benefits from Patrick Wilson’s committed star turn.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Against all odds, “Nashville” series regular Peeples keeps the film watchable, delivering a capable star turn with enough flashes of soul to belie the script’s artifice and credible pop vocals to boot.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    The goofiness is redeemed somewhat by a wickedly violent climax — the exclamation point at the end of a rather simple sentence.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    The performers are mostly out to sea without a paddle trying to make sense of hateful characters, but Trimbur at least shows some comic spark and strikes a few sympathetic notes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    In a welcome gender reversal from the father-son dynamic of “Heaven Is for Real,” Garner and Rogers deliver fully committed performances that credibly convey the physical and mental anguish endured by sick children and their caregivers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Lapses in the screenplay are mitigated only slightly by the natural chemistry between Long and Rossum.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    As violent as its predecessor yet noticeably duller and less outrageous, Machete Kills is dragged to the finish line entirely by its director’s madcap energy and an absurd cast of major stars in strange cameos.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Loitering With Intent is essentially a 75-minute hangout movie, which would work better if the characters were worth hanging out with.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Every bit as sitcom-ish and saccharine as its predecessor, but considerably less distinctive.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    The ADD overload combined with an understandably kid-friendly approach to horror (no one’s ever in real danger, and the monsters are never too scary) results in a disposable product intended to appeal to everyone but likely to resonate with no one.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    A terminally quirky indie dramedy, Bottled Up risks trivializing prescription drug abuse in service of a trite middle-age romance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Although the X-Men ensembles are usually large, there are simply too many characters for the action-heavy “Apocalypse” to properly juggle.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Earth to Echo reaches for the stars with its gentle sci-fi shenanigans, but the rote result remains decidedly earthbound.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Shyamalan has long been criticized for serving up borderline (or downright) silly premises with a straight face and overtly pretentious atmosphere, but he basically abandons that approach here in favor of a looser, more playful dynamic between his fresh-faced leads.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Despite a game lead performance from smallscreen star Katie Cassidy (“Arrow”) as a young woman with multiple personality disorder and an incorrigible punk attitude, this latest low-budget outing from helmer John Suits simply doesn’t have the imagination or resources necessary to pull off its clumsy stabs at visual pizzazz.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Its compassion and careful sidestepping of exploitation tropes can’t make up for a fundamental lack of depth and urgency in the storytelling.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    "Spark” remains a lovingly made and shot tease, designed to ensure that what really happens at Burning Man stays at Burning Man.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Max
    It’s too bad the film doesn’t provide a better sense of what makes the Belgian Malinois so uniquely suited to the battlefield, or find a way to pay more than lip service to the deep bonds developed between military men and animals.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    The sudsy quality of the production ensures all the performers look terrific, but aren’t given particularly impressive material to work with.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Despite an impressive global scope and admirable ethnic diversity among the interview subjects, the central thesis that women are leading the charge on green issues receives nothing but anecdotal support.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    The graceful camerawork, precise editing and high-quality animation still can’t disguise the lack of imagination that went into the overall conception and the repetitive sameness that creeps into every bind the penguins find themselves in.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Geoff Berkshire
    Less reliant on slow-burn suspense and larded with fake-out jump scares, this is the first sequel in the series that fails to advance the overall mythology in any meaningful way.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    With plot elements cobbled together from recent animated hits, the blandly executed pic might as well be titled “Happy Minions of Madagascar’s Ice Age.”
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Exploiting Lawrence's newfound fame is the only hope this ill-conceived, poorly executed venture has of connecting with audiences before poisonous word of mouth sends potential buyers in search of a more attractive address.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Daddy’s Home isn’t so much a lump of coal as an empty box.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Cheerfully exhorting imagination, creativity and bravery in children while demonstrating none of those virtues itself, The Hero of Color City proves to be a dispiritingly colorless feature-length babysitter.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    The film’s haphazard structure and freewheeling arguments only serve to reinforce tired pothead cliches — it’s paranoid, prone to starry-eyed dorm-room philosophizing, and it doesn’t know when to quit.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Overlong film quickly becomes tedious whenever the camera strays from the lions, who don’t have much personality but prove more compelling than the humans.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    The timidly plotted proceedings never veer from romantic-comedy formula. There’s a whole lot of talk and very little action here, and not just because the squeaky-clean pic wears its PG rating like a badge of honor.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Character actor Michael Cudlitz’s first leading role is the sole selling point of Dark Tourist, a well-acted but rote and ultimately repellent character study of a psychologically disturbed loner.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    The type of sporadically silly and patently predictable horror pic that would look like filler on Syfy’s weekend lineup, The Other Side of the Door brings virtually nothing new to the supernatural genre.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    The low-budget production feels chintzy and impossibly square, even by tyke standards.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Even a brisk running time, barely topping 80 minutes, is too long to ask audiences to stay in the company of these characters and their terrible self-inflicted predicaments.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    So good at making the most outlandish elements of his first two films seem completely credible, Jones can’t find a way to get this cartoony spectacle to soar. His heartfelt approach to the material only underlines the silliness.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Visual spectacle still takes precedence over coherent plotting, and the human characters retain all the gravitas of generic placeholders who accidentally made it into the shooting script.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    The Gallows isn’t without a certain amount of atmosphere, it simply feels borrowed wholesale. That would matter less with a better script, but the four main characters are paper-thin even by genre norms.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    While there are a few good jokes and sight gags along the way, the main impression left by She's All That is how numbingly consistent its lack of originality is.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Neither warm and fuzzy in the best holiday movie traditions, nor edgy and irreverent a la “Bad Santa” (coincidentally also co-starring Graham, to better effect), it’s something of a mystery what audience A Merry Friggin’ Christmas intends to serve.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    The lukewarm family dynamics sit awkwardly alongside equally underwhelming action sequences.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Slack narrative and abysmal dialogue render the vague generational satire meaningless to anyone unfamiliar with Tolstoy’s work (and depressing to those in the know).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    There isn’t a pharmaceutical cocktail powerful enough to improve the dreadful comedy of Better Living Through Chemistry.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Unacceptable Levels marries folksy astonishment and alarmist speculation in a documentary far too easy to dismiss.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    Even a prickly pro like Sutherland can’t do anything to elevate a hokey self-help lecture disguised as family entertainment.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Geoff Berkshire
    “Lazarus” shamelessly steals from superior genre efforts and lacks any distinguishing traits beyond a wildly overqualified cast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    Essentially a homemovie cobbled together with bland talking-head interviews, director Yuliya Tikhonova’s film offers little to interest jazz aficionados or those simply curious about the band’s lineup of veteran sidemen from the era of classic jazz.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    The second feature from writer-director Tenney Fairchild (“The Good Humor Man”) actually attempts to be an emotionally resonant relationship tale, but lives down to its title by delivering nothing but inane comedy and insufferable drama.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    Results are simple-minded at best, contemptible at worst; most audiences would rather watch anything else.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    Eric Chaney’s debut feature, Indigo Children, doesn’t so much copy Terrence Malick as swallow the filmmaker’s stylistic tics whole and vomit them out onscreen in an ungainly if mercifully brief mess.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    An aggressively obnoxious tone undermines a decent concept and appealing cast.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    Empty cynicism isn’t a substitute for well-reasoned critique, and Roth winds up looking more clueless than the so-called “social justice warriors” he’s trying to satirize.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    Sanchez’s thoroughly conventional approach here does little to elevate a dismally generic script from frequent collaborator Jamie Nash.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    Writer-director Eli Morgan Gesner (a clothing designer and skateboarder who previously helmed the skateboarding and hip-hop doc “Concrete Jungle”) could have milked the premise for gleeful counterculture exploitation (like a 21st-century “Basket Case”) or campy John Waters-style gross-out comedy, but settles for mean-spirited banality.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    While every moment is captured with the reverence of a fawning fan, Holwerda’s star-struck approach neglects to shed new light on his subjects or even showcase their greatest hits.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Geoff Berkshire
    An utterly unevolved romantic comedy, “Cavemen” tries to split the difference between raunchy and sweet and fails miserably on all counts.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 10 Geoff Berkshire
    At least the narrative sloppiness and ineptly delivered themes in the script by Brian Bird and Lisa G. Shillingburg (freely adapted from the novel by Jim Stovall) feel of a piece with the entire production.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 10 Geoff Berkshire
    This confused and confusing pic delivers no thrills, chills or anything remotely surprising.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 10 Geoff Berkshire
    Lack of originality feels like a fairly meaningless complaint when Roth’s film was derivative enough to begin with.
    • 8 Metascore
    • 10 Geoff Berkshire
    Jack’s predicament is both revolting and claustrophobic, but he never emerges as any kind of hero or villain, just a passive victim, which makes the pic’s most off-putting quality its endless tedium.

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