For 664 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Kenny's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Breakfast on Pluto
Lowest review score: 0 I Know Who Killed Me
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 97 out of 664
664 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The moviemakers are accomplished enough to make something coherent out of this tonal mishmash, but I was left with a "was this trip really necessary" feeling for all that.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    By the jaw-dropping climax (an argument over a family portrait), and the film’s not-entirely unpredictable denouement, you aren’t sure whether you are witnessing an investigative family chronicle or an act of revenge.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Despite its best efforts, Tanna drifts into a mode of exoticism that renders it an ultimately frustrating experience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Ramshackle one minute, pointlessly deliberate the next.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    This sentimental, nearly genteel movie demonstrates there’s a world of difference between invoking magic and conjuring it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The issues presented in When Two Worlds Collide are so crucial that it feels churlish to characterize it as a dutiful, and ultimately pedestrian, documentary. There is something evasive about it as well.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    I wonder if there was a point in the making of this film at which Hickenlooper might have realized he picked the wrong subject. [May 2004, p. 18]
    • Premiere
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Too-laborious meditation on life and death.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Good-hearted stuff, to be sure, but mainly of interest to lovers of cinematic comfort food.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    It's too bad that the movie induces eyeball-rolling almost as much as it does armrest-clutching.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    A more finely focused treatment would have made a much better summation of, or introduction to, Mr. Naharin’s work.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie becomes less fizzy once DeCillo decides to make A Statement (a rather incoherent one at that).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The information here is compelling and frightening, but the movie is ham-handed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The reason I’m rating this movie higher than I would otherwise, is Christopher Walken. His commitment to making Caleb as thoroughly unlikable as humanly possible yields a character who’s kind of terrifyingly off-putting even when his words and actions are ineffectual. A piece of acting alchemy of which only few are capable. I can’t imagine how powerful it might have been in a better movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie has some pleasures, but can be heartily recommended only to those who like their entertainments equally inoffensive and inconsequential.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s prime mover, Rogen, is a doge of stoner humor, and he shows incredible discipline in this film by saving the first weed joke for twenty minutes in. I commend him for that.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Instead of maintaining an effervescent fizzle, Phantom Boy too frequently sputters piffle.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    Ms. Olson’s images are often captivating, but too often undercut by the aforementioned aspiring-to-the-dialectical voice-over, which is awkwardly written, and delivered with a lack of affect that grows tedious over the course of an hour.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Throughout, the filmmakers live up to the movie’s title. But as the story comes to a close, they opt to wrap it in comforting cliché, and they turn a miserable but credible viewing experience into a confounding one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    One thing’s for sure: In Staying Vertical, every character has sex on the brain, all the time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    In my cut of the film, it ends after Jones opens the parcel from his son that's been sitting on his kitchen table since shortly after he left. I recommend viewers leave the theater at that point. You won't be sorry that you did.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Tharlo instead opts for fleeting charm and shaggy humanism, until the narrative takes a grim turn that’s both trite and sexist. The bottom drops out of the movie, leaving its interest almost exclusively ethnographic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    The performances are conscientious and earnest.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    The movie makes no attempt to engage any current situation, basking instead in a one-dimensional nostalgia.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The storyline is so rote that the idiosyncrasies of the scene don’t register with any power.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s grave commitment to its own quirkiness is admirable, I suppose. But that doesn’t mean I’m going to recommend it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    A figure as unusual and distinctive as Fields certainly deserves a commemoration. The bad news here is that he deserves better than what Danny Says serves up.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    A consistent—almost catalog-like, you might say—array of pictorial wonders, Medeas, the debut feature from the Italian-born director Andrea Pallaoro is also a work of considerable daring. This plain, almost minimalist narrative presents itself from a position that neither talks down to nor attempts to cozy up to its audience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The image of Gwyneth Paltrow looking anguish-stricken has become such a cinematic meme that it hardly bodes well for Proof that it opens with this sight.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    There’s some intriguing social commentary in the Chinese comedic melodrama I Am Not Madame Bovary.... But appreciating it, and the other points of interest in the movie, requires a perhaps unusual amount of patience, or even indulgence.

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