For 644 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Kenny's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Million Dollar Baby
Lowest review score: 0 I Know Who Killed Me
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 93 out of 644
644 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    For my money, if I'm in the mood for the kind of aesthetic and emotional experience Saints is selling, I'll just blast Jim Carroll's more concise (and rocking!) "People Who Died" out of my iPod.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Haupt’s film moves along agreeably enough for a while, and the intercutting between the film’s real-life subjects, now at an advanced age, and their dramatized adventures almost 60 years ago, convincingly creates a rooting interest.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    The dumbness doesn't kill Death at a Funeral, but it certainly weakens it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Glenn Kenny
    A picture that certain Brits and connoisseurs of British colloquial English might call "a grower" … more moving and funny the more I think about it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    In spite of its abundant action — and for all the interspecies mashups, this is as much an action-adventure animated movie as it is a funny-animal animated movie — is a pretty relaxing experience for the adult viewer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie has some pleasures, but can be heartily recommended only to those who like their entertainments equally inoffensive and inconsequential.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s prime mover, Rogen, is a doge of stoner humor, and he shows incredible discipline in this film by saving the first weed joke for twenty minutes in. I commend him for that.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Glenn Kenny
    A giddy kick-out-the-jams entertainment. Diary takes a tack that's not exactly new, but is new to Romero, and as one might expect, the director brings a sharp and uncompromising new perspective to it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Instead of maintaining an effervescent fizzle, Phantom Boy too frequently sputters piffle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Glenn Kenny
    Terrifically charming and energetic film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    An efficient and pleasurable bad-man-tries-to-go-good exposition that gives Gibson ample opportunity to flex his now-somewhat-grizzled movie-star muscle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Stardust is an eye-poppingly elaborate fantasy that's shot through with action-movie adrenaline and attitude.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    I suppose the fact that I was affected as I was by Wedding Doll is testimony to its emotional effectiveness. But while Hagit is able to crack a smile at the movie’s end, I feel a pall wrapping around me every time I contemplate her predicament, or the predicament of her real-life models.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Glenn Kenny
    Margot is a fleet, strangely enjoyable film, animated by the acuity of Baumbach's perceptions and -- this helps a lot -- the frequent laugh-out-loud wit of his dialogue.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    The betrayal of Native Americans by larger forces looms over this powerful movie without ever being explicitly discussed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    A very nearly epic romance, one that approaches the idea of a ménage-a-trois as emblematic of a particular idealism on the part of its participants rather than a hotsy-totsy taboo-busting arrangement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    One of Cruise's most deeply cherished ambitions is to be a great actor, and this movie goes to great lengths to let him do that--sort of. You'll understand what I mean during the sequence in which there is more than one Philip Seymour Hoffman on the screen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Glenn Kenny
    By the end the movie has pretty much ceased taking itself at all seriously, devolving into a nonchalant giggliness of the stoned variety that's completely apropos.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    A low-key and intelligent character study, Miss Stevens doesn’t escape from its indie-film commonplaces often enough to become really distinctive, but it has enough conscientiousness about its people that it doesn’t let the commonplaces fester into movie-sinking clichés.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    The movie tells an incomplete version of the band’s story...but provides a comprehensive and sometimes harrowing portrayal of the grind a working bar band in the 1970s had to endure to get by.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    Ms. Olson’s images are often captivating, but too often undercut by the aforementioned aspiring-to-the-dialectical voice-over, which is awkwardly written, and delivered with a lack of affect that grows tedious over the course of an hour.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Throughout, the filmmakers live up to the movie’s title. But as the story comes to a close, they opt to wrap it in comforting cliché, and they turn a miserable but credible viewing experience into a confounding one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    A picture about tragedy in one American family's life, and it's a convincing and humane one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    One thing’s for sure: In Staying Vertical, every character has sex on the brain, all the time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Most of the dialogue is pretty fresh, and it’s delivered with great brio, particularly by Owen. Roberts, alas, is not at her best here, but she has almost nothing to work with.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    In my cut of the film, it ends after Jones opens the parcel from his son that's been sitting on his kitchen table since shortly after he left. I recommend viewers leave the theater at that point. You won't be sorry that you did.

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