For 123 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Guy Lodge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Lobster
Lowest review score: 10 Plastic
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 56 out of 123
  2. Negative: 12 out of 123
123 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    An altogether smashing sequel to 2011′s better-than-expected “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” this vivid, violent extension of humanoid ape Caesar’s troubled quest for independence bests its predecessor in nearly every technical and conceptual department.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    Not merely a story of interspecies hierarchy, then, White God also puts forward a simple but elegant metaphor for racial and class oppression, as the outcast (or even outcaste) masses, sidelined in favor of the elite few, band together to assert their collective strength.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    Fearsomely visceral and impeccably performed, it’s a brisk, bracing update, even as it remains exquisitely in period.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    A wickedly funny protest against societal preference for nuclear coupledom that escalates, by its own sly logic, into a love story of profound tenderness and originality.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    So involving is the raw content of The Look of Silence that some might view its formal elegance as mere luxury, yet the film reveals Oppenheimer to be a documentary stylist of evolving grace and sophistication.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    The film’s turn toward the tragic is hardly untelegraphed, but its emotional blows still land with crushing precision.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Though the film comprehensively details the political and economic subtleties of what it declares “the crime of the century,” its narrative remains primarily a human-focused one, highlighting the stories of selected steadfast victims, as well as the heroic movers and shakers in the struggle.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    '71
    A vivid, shivery survival thriller that turns the red-brick residential streets of Belfast into a war zone of unconscionable peril.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    It’s the rare film about adolescence that doesn’t seem exclusively targeted either to teens or to adults. Rarer still, it’s one that takes an interest in the nourishing qualities of female friendship.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    This complex, compassionate film finds both wicked humor and, less expectedly, transcendent hope in America’s gaudy fixation with Christmas spirit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Icily disquieting rather than scary, the film is less an exercise in narrative than in tonal mastery.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Simply relating the narrative of Andrew Dosunmu’s seductive immigrant drama Mother of George would do little to convey the film’s stark, poetic power, much less its extraordinary visual and sonic acumen.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Conventionally constructed but remarkable for the honest, intimate rapport it achieves with highly vulnerable human subjects.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Robert Greene's extraordinary collaboration with actress Brandy Burre is a playful, provocative examination of self-performance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Audiences may come down from the high a little sooner than the film does, with the characters’ increasingly ill-considered actions testing our faith and engagements to the breaking point, but the sheer centripetal force of the film’s vigorous technique never loses its hold.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Assisted by the superb performances of his two young, refreshingly unaffected leads, Carbone has a profound understanding of the close but conflicted bond that exists between brothers on either side of the puberty divide.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    It’s a film that purists might insist isn’t horror in the strictest sense, though this slow-burning investigation of unseemly goings-on at a rural Christian commune is frightening in any genre language.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    It etches a sweet, sad and solemnly fatalistic love story between feeding times.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    The Guest is not new, exactly, but Wingard knows just which buttons to push, and he pushes them with gusto. Stevens, meanwhile, has never been better.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Bjork’s charm has always hinged on her ability to be guileless and unknowable at once; “Biophilia Live” is no exception.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Kay Cannon’s script is even lighter on narrative than its predecessor, but fills any resulting void with a concentrated supply of riotous gags, and a renewed emphasis on the virtues of female collaboration and independence.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Just as Niccol’s narrative structure is at once fraught and immaculate in its escalation of ideas and character friction, so his arguments remain ever-so-slightly oblique despite the tidiness of their presentation.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    The alternately playful and elegiac Stories We Tell is wholly of a piece with her fiction work, and just as rewarding.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Though realized on a more modest scale than other Aardman features, the film is still an absolute delight in terms of set and character design, with sophisticated blink-and-you’ll-miss-it detailing to counterbalance the franchise’s cruder visual trademarks.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Amy
    Hardly innovative in form, but boasting the same depth of feeling and breadth of archival material that made Kapadia’s “Senna” so rewarding, this lengthy but immersive portrait will hit hard with viewers who regard Winehouse among the great lost voices not just of a generation, but of an entire musical genre.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    It’s an improbably exciting match of knife-edge storytelling and a florid vintage aesthetic best represented by Gabriel Yared’s glorious orchestral score.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Hostage thrillers are all-too-often shrill affairs, with clock-watching screenwriters wringing maximum melodrama from spiraling disorder. Not so Tobias Lindholm’s superb A Hijacking, which actually grows more chillingly subdued as its nightmare scenario unfolds.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Ex Machina turns out to be far wittier and more sensual than its coolly unblemished exterior implies; it’s a trick that mirrors Ava’s own apparent Turing-test-defying evolution.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Ultimately story is secondary to Russell’s delicious detailing of character and milieu.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    A measured, moving account of a brief period in the later life of the troubled sculptress, could hardly be the work of anyone else, with its sparseness of technique and persistent spiritual curiosity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Distinguished by exquisite performances from Emmanuelle Devos and Mathieu Amalric as a bourgeois couple unsure when to call time on their marriage, the pic initially follows the dry, droll template set by so many tasteful French relationship dramedies, before venturing into less comforting emotional territory for its final act.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    [An] engaging, elegiac portrait of a legend in the making.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Its visual and sonic verve more than compensate for some overworked symbolism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    The film keeps its good-evil borders compellingly supple, at least until a wobbly finale that requires Sarah to act like the Hollywood heroine she has so strenuously avoided becoming. It’s a minor blot on a film otherwise propulsively alive with prickly politics.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Though Henry Hobson’s hugely promising debut feature is generating buzz from the casting of a fine, low-key Arnold Schwarzenegger as the anguished father of a semi-zombified teen, it’s Abigail Breslin’s gutsy, nuanced turn as the reluctantly undead title character — at once a heroine to be protected and a mutant threat to be destroyed — that makes the film unique within its grisly canon.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    This wilfully unpleasant midnight special further demonstrates its helmer’s machete-sharp sense of craft, and puts an interestingly matched ensemble — including an outstanding Imogen Poots — gleefully through the wringer.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    That We Are What We Are steers just shy of silliness even at its most outrageous is in large part thanks to a committed cast of non-disposable character actors.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Winocour hurtles into a violent, heart-in-mouth third act rife with look-behind-you peril. It’s a silly but robustly effective escalation of the latent suspense already conjured in the impressive, snakily extended party sequence.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Neither as striking nor as fundamentally scary as its predecessor, this pumped-up, robustly crafted pic is still quite a ride.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    A straightforward account of the show’s journey from conception to rehearsal to Great White Way triumph, it effectively doubles as a traditional let’s-put-on-a-show musical in its own right, albeit one with heavier guitars.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    A sly, insidious and intermittently hilarious domestic thriller.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Alluring if not especially illuminating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Soul music’s alleged redemptive powers are fully at work in this jumbled, sketchily written but vastly appealing true-life musical comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Redundancy remains a problem, but this overlong superhero sequel gets by on sound, fury and star chemistry.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    It’s a less playful enterprise than the original, but meets the era’s darker demands for action reboots with machine-tooled efficiency and a hint of soul.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Affectionately honoring the everyday quirks of Bond’s stories, while subtly updating their middle-class London milieu, King’s film may divide loyal Paddingtophiles with its high-stakes caper plot, but their enraptured kids won’t care a whit.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    [A] good, middlebrow adaptation — which, despite being scripted by Banville himself, sacrifices much of the novel’s structural intricacy for Masterpiece-style emotional accessibility.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Unexpectedly but effectively cast in a role that plays to his sullen strengths, Pitt has a palpable, playful rapport with Arianda, a Tony-winning Broadway ingenue whose warm, expressive features and tinderbox comic timing recalls the young Marisa Tomei.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    This dynamically acted, unapologetically contrived pic reps the filmmaker’s best chance to date of connecting with a wider audience — one likely to share the helmer’s bristling anger over corruptly maintained class divides in modern-day America.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    The upshot of this loopy masquerade is more predictable than it is progressive, but considerably pleasurable thanks to Morris’s generous supply of pithy one-liners and the resourceful, ribald skills of Bell, as engaging and elastic a comic everywoman here as she was in her impressive directorial debut “In a World … ”
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Avranas’ film employs an irony-free meter that certainly distinguishes his work from that of Lanthimos or Athina Rachel Tsangari, and lends the film’s most explicitly severe sequences of domestic and sexual abuse a kind of cumulative numbing power.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Michael Polish’s Big Sur offers an elegantly muted take on the midlife ennui of Kerouac’s autobiographical 1962 novel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Clumsy storytelling decisions, however, can’t entirely get in the way of a good story, and it’s when Suite francaise focuses on the simplest human dynamics of its yarn that it forges a sincere emotional connection.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    As appealingly humanized by Collins and Claflin, Rosie and Alex are sufficiently flawed, three-dimensional beings for their continued attachment to each other to convince.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Campillo’s original screenplay demands any number of trusting leaps from its audience and characters alike, yet maintains credibility thanks to the studied assurance of its most elaborate setpieces, and the wealth of socioeconomic detail in its portrayal of both Daniel’s aging-yuppie lifestyle and the nervous group dynamic of the immigrants.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Powered by a vigorous, image-shedding lead turn from James McAvoy as a coked-up Edinburgh detective on the fast track to either promotion or self-implosion, this descent into Scotch-marinated madness begins as ugly comedy, segues almost imperceptibly into farcical tragedy, and inevitably — perhaps intentionally — loses control in the process.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Seemingly caught between a daring impressionistic approach and a pedantic recital of dates and locations, this three-hour endurance test is marked by sincere adoration of its subject.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Mud
    It’s a broader, starrier project than either of Nichols’s previous films, and he handles the transition to the major league with relative confidence.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    It’s a thin premise that cues much cheery knockabout comedy, with ample scope for impressively whooshy 3D tracking shots.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    There’s enjoyably smutty comedy to spare... but the film’s bleakest segments are actually its strongest.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    An enthusiastic but low-fizz romantic farce that gets by principally on the charms of a cast speckled with gifted funnymen (and, more particularly, funnywomen).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    While this appropriately brief film unravels its enigma at a tidy clip, it gathers neither enough heat, nor quite enough of a chill, to linger in the bones.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    [An] appealingly absurd thriller.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    An arrestingly nihilistic Depression melodrama, marked by courageous performances and exquisite production values... The result is both problematic and fascinating, an unsympathetic spiral of human tragedy that plays a little like a hand-me-down folk ballad put to film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    The thrills and the effects are cheap, but this is in hard-driving, good-humoured command of its own silliness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    A tasteful grieving-family weepie, it's conceived and performed with utmost sincerity, yet lacks the intemperate human authenticity, the sense of profound strangeness in the everyday, that made Trier's ‘Reprise’ and ‘Oslo, August 31st’ so hard to shake.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    What Hyena lacks in invention, however, it makes up for in technical bravado and geographical specificity.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    An amusing, extravagantly implausible farce that nonetheless makes a pointed argument about the perceived marginalization of childless women in modern society.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Don’t tell Liam Neeson, but someone had the gall to make a violent Euro-thriller about a rampaging American dad without him. And not a bad one either.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    A proficient but personality-free policer that demands little of either its audience or its enviable best-of-British cast, this simplistic urban morality tale miscasts the appealing James McAvoy as one good cop whose dogged pursuit of Mark Strong’s alpha criminal only uncovers the rot within police ranks.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Tsai here seems to be stripping his ornately eccentric style down to formal fundamentals. A certain pictorial grace remains; his sense of humor, sadly, appears to have been largely tossed out with the bathwater.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Mellow, digestibly sweet and embellished with lovely folk tunes, this modest bit of Americana reveals pleasing new sides of both leads.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Earnest issue drama and pulpy B-thriller mechanics make awkward but not uncompelling bedfellows in Honour.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    It’s as handsomely shot as any film about an ace shutterbug ought to be, and Binoche infuses familiar internal crises with palpable pain and urgency.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    The rare prestige pic that could actually stand to be longer.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Its repetitive qualities are beyond reproach. Every bit as amiable and disposable as its predecessor, it recycles everything from slapstick gags to its own voice cast.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    The consistently celebratory stance of “Kink” is commendable, but also feels somewhat limiting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    The film is easier to admire than it is to invest in emotionally, though its pulse quickens with a dramatic, and boldly untelegraphed, feminist twist in the rural-set final reel.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    There’s typical grace and good humour in Kore-eda’s handling of this all-but-impossible situation. But the film’s critical lack of dramatic nuance undercuts its emotional resonance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    The narrative’s time-travel element allows for plenty of fluffy, fleet-footed action.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Attention is retained by the commendably unhistrionic leads, who convincingly etch the pair’s enduring devotion even when passions run dry.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    It’s all extravagantly daft, moves at a fair clip and is over before you expect it to be.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    As ruggedly crafted as you’d expect from director Kevin Macdonald, with a sturdy ensemble led by Jude Law as a submarine captain of formidable sangfroid, the film nonetheless never quite sparks to life.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    It’s an opportunity only half seized: Haphazard both as biography and historical survey, the film asks more salient questions than it can answer in a rushed 76 minutes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    A wry, oh-so-gentle dual character study saved from sleepiness by the unexpected star pairing of Catherine Deneuve and Gustave Kervern.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    At least three entertaining films are jostling for position in Australian writer-director Julius Avery’s messily propulsive debut feature, Son of a Gun — and if none ultimately emerges dominant, the red-blooded tussle between them is never dull to watch.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    The upside for Saint Laurent’s admirers is that Bonello’s film reflects more of the designer’s tortured creative drive in its dark onyx surfaces; it’s the slightly deranged auteur portrait that a fellow artist and iconoclast deserves.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    [An] amiable but flat-footed debut feature.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    The film milks some brisk comedy from its upstairs-downstairs peekaboo, but is too breezy to convince in its depiction of obsessive erotic fixation — making for a “Diary” that oddly feels less exposing as it goes along.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    Salaciously watchable but finally hokey.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    It’s a rare pleasure to see Tomei in a lead role, and she fills out the short cuts in Lawrence’s characterization with wry warmth and a hint of swallowed disappointment.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    This admirable, watercolor-delicate tale of individual feminist emancipation never quite blooms into living color, hampered by spotty casting and Richard Laxton’s overly deliberate direction.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    The ensemble labors sincerely to bring Nelson’s dense, frequently didactic writing to life, though it can be a hard task.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    Well-meaning but dated and frequently risible issue-drama.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    Airless visual treatment and mannered performances compound the impression that LaBute might have been better off saving this material for the stage, though it’d be a pretty tame trifle in either context.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    The voice ensemble is game, if not especially well matched.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    Correctly ascertaining that auds will be less interested in the outcome than in the obstacles along the way, Levasseur plants and executes the pic’s exclamation-point scares with grinning, squelching gusto.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    Both stars are in agreeable if uncharacteristically muted form, doing little to distinguish Genz’s pic from any amount of formula-following filler in the same B-movie ballpark.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Guy Lodge
    It’s a testament to the duo’s jazzy comic chemistry that they wring some laughs from this dated, frankly sinister premise.

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