For 166 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Guy Lodge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Selfish Giant
Lowest review score: 10 Plastic
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 81 out of 166
  2. Negative: 17 out of 166
166 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Redundancy remains a problem, but this overlong superhero sequel gets by on sound, fury and star chemistry.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Grabby and grubby in equal measure, this meticulously composed trawl through the contents of several middle-class Austrians’ cellars (a space, according to Seidl, that his countrymen traditionally give over to their most personal hobbies) yields more than a few startling discoveries.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    It’s a less playful enterprise than the original, but meets the era’s darker demands for action reboots with machine-tooled efficiency and a hint of soul.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Utilitarian in construction but personally invested, it’s a duly humble career overview that doesn’t risk much individual interpretation of such rich, essential films as “Black Girl,” “Xala” and “Moolaade” — though it should leave viewers eager to make (or regain) their acquaintance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Affectionately honoring the everyday quirks of Bond’s stories, while subtly updating their middle-class London milieu, King’s film may divide loyal Paddingtophiles with its high-stakes caper plot, but their enraptured kids won’t care a whit.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Whether scenes tilt toward very mordant farce or gut-stabbing trauma, there’s a compelling sense — crafted or otherwise — that the actors are driving the tone from scene to scene, with Silver and his incisive editor Stephen Gurewitz determining the emotional transitions between them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    [A] good, middlebrow adaptation — which, despite being scripted by Banville himself, sacrifices much of the novel’s structural intricacy for Masterpiece-style emotional accessibility.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Unexpectedly but effectively cast in a role that plays to his sullen strengths, Pitt has a palpable, playful rapport with Arianda, a Tony-winning Broadway ingenue whose warm, expressive features and tinderbox comic timing recalls the young Marisa Tomei.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    It’s the high-gloss realization of that world that affords many of the pic’s most delicious pleasures: “Bombay Velvet” is an extravagant canvas for both production designer Sonal Sawant and costume designer Niharika Bhasin Khan, one on which even apparent anachronisms look calculated.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    This elegantly wrought oddity appears at the halfway mark to be heading into uncharacteristically hopeful territory for Solondz — until a toe-tapping intermission marks a reassuring plunge into abject despair.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    This dynamically acted, unapologetically contrived pic reps the filmmaker’s best chance to date of connecting with a wider audience — one likely to share the helmer’s bristling anger over corruptly maintained class divides in modern-day America.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    The upshot of this loopy masquerade is more predictable than it is progressive, but considerably pleasurable thanks to Morris’s generous supply of pithy one-liners and the resourceful, ribald skills of Bell, as engaging and elastic a comic everywoman here as she was in her impressive directorial debut “In a World … ”
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Avranas’ film employs an irony-free meter that certainly distinguishes his work from that of Lanthimos or Athina Rachel Tsangari, and lends the film’s most explicitly severe sequences of domestic and sexual abuse a kind of cumulative numbing power.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Michael Polish’s Big Sur offers an elegantly muted take on the midlife ennui of Kerouac’s autobiographical 1962 novel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Oakes’ film may not share its subject’s hard-headed journalistic drive, but as an articulation of grief — directed by a childhood friend, with significant participation from the Foley family — it’s undeniably moving.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Thompson and his appealing young cast enliven the material with authentic, ingenuous feeling; there’s a palpable understanding here of the substantial difficulties involved in growing up under any circumstances, and Thompson’s script never condescends to its teen subjects with dewy-eyed nostalgia for youth.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    What’s missing is the unexpected emotional urgency of “Skyfall,” as the film sustains its predecessor’s nostalgia kick with a less sentimental bent.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Clumsy storytelling decisions, however, can’t entirely get in the way of a good story, and it’s when Suite francaise focuses on the simplest human dynamics of its yarn that it forges a sincere emotional connection.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    As appealingly humanized by Collins and Claflin, Rosie and Alex are sufficiently flawed, three-dimensional beings for their continued attachment to each other to convince.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Campillo’s original screenplay demands any number of trusting leaps from its audience and characters alike, yet maintains credibility thanks to the studied assurance of its most elaborate setpieces, and the wealth of socioeconomic detail in its portrayal of both Daniel’s aging-yuppie lifestyle and the nervous group dynamic of the immigrants.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Powered by a vigorous, image-shedding lead turn from James McAvoy as a coked-up Edinburgh detective on the fast track to either promotion or self-implosion, this descent into Scotch-marinated madness begins as ugly comedy, segues almost imperceptibly into farcical tragedy, and inevitably — perhaps intentionally — loses control in the process.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Seemingly caught between a daring impressionistic approach and a pedantic recital of dates and locations, this three-hour endurance test is marked by sincere adoration of its subject.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Mud
    It’s a broader, starrier project than either of Nichols’s previous films, and he handles the transition to the major league with relative confidence.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    It’s a thin premise that cues much cheery knockabout comedy, with ample scope for impressively whooshy 3D tracking shots.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    There’s enjoyably smutty comedy to spare... but the film’s bleakest segments are actually its strongest.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    An enthusiastic but low-fizz romantic farce that gets by principally on the charms of a cast speckled with gifted funnymen (and, more particularly, funnywomen).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    While this appropriately brief film unravels its enigma at a tidy clip, it gathers neither enough heat, nor quite enough of a chill, to linger in the bones.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    [An] appealingly absurd thriller.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    An arrestingly nihilistic Depression melodrama, marked by courageous performances and exquisite production values... The result is both problematic and fascinating, an unsympathetic spiral of human tragedy that plays a little like a hand-me-down folk ballad put to film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    The thrills and the effects are cheap, but this is in hard-driving, good-humoured command of its own silliness.

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