For 85 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Guy Lodge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Look of Silence
Lowest review score: 10 Plastic
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 37 out of 85
  2. Negative: 8 out of 85
85 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    The film’s turn toward the tragic is hardly untelegraphed, but its emotional blows still land with crushing precision.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    Not merely a story of interspecies hierarchy, then, White God also puts forward a simple but elegant metaphor for racial and class oppression, as the outcast (or even outcaste) masses, sidelined in favor of the elite few, band together to assert their collective strength.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    An altogether smashing sequel to 2011′s better-than-expected “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” this vivid, violent extension of humanoid ape Caesar’s troubled quest for independence bests its predecessor in nearly every technical and conceptual department.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    So involving is the raw content of The Look of Silence that some might view its formal elegance as mere luxury, yet the film reveals Oppenheimer to be a documentary stylist of evolving grace and sophistication.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Icily disquieting rather than scary, the film is less an exercise in narrative than in tonal mastery.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Though the film comprehensively details the political and economic subtleties of what it declares “the crime of the century,” its narrative remains primarily a human-focused one, highlighting the stories of selected steadfast victims, as well as the heroic movers and shakers in the struggle.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Simply relating the narrative of Andrew Dosunmu’s seductive immigrant drama Mother of George would do little to convey the film’s stark, poetic power, much less its extraordinary visual and sonic acumen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    It’s the rare film about adolescence that doesn’t seem exclusively targeted either to teens or to adults. Rarer still, it’s one that takes an interest in the nourishing qualities of female friendship.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    This complex, compassionate film finds both wicked humor and, less expectedly, transcendent hope in America’s gaudy fixation with Christmas spirit.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    '71
    A vivid, shivery survival thriller that turns the red-brick residential streets of Belfast into a war zone of unconscionable peril.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Hostage thrillers are all-too-often shrill affairs, with clock-watching screenwriters wringing maximum melodrama from spiraling disorder. Not so Tobias Lindholm’s superb A Hijacking, which actually grows more chillingly subdued as its nightmare scenario unfolds.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    The alternately playful and elegiac Stories We Tell is wholly of a piece with her fiction work, and just as rewarding.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    A measured, moving account of a brief period in the later life of the troubled sculptress, could hardly be the work of anyone else, with its sparseness of technique and persistent spiritual curiosity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    It’s a film that purists might insist isn’t horror in the strictest sense, though this slow-burning investigation of unseemly goings-on at a rural Christian commune is frightening in any genre language.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    It etches a sweet, sad and solemnly fatalistic love story between feeding times.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Assisted by the superb performances of his two young, refreshingly unaffected leads, Carbone has a profound understanding of the close but conflicted bond that exists between brothers on either side of the puberty divide.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    It’s an improbably exciting match of knife-edge storytelling and a florid vintage aesthetic best represented by Gabriel Yared’s glorious orchestral score.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Just as Niccol’s narrative structure is at once fraught and immaculate in its escalation of ideas and character friction, so his arguments remain ever-so-slightly oblique despite the tidiness of their presentation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Bjork’s charm has always hinged on her ability to be guileless and unknowable at once; “Biophilia Live” is no exception.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    The film keeps its good-evil borders compellingly supple, at least until a wobbly finale that requires Sarah to act like the Hollywood heroine she has so strenuously avoided becoming. It’s a minor blot on a film otherwise propulsively alive with prickly politics.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Ultimately story is secondary to Russell’s delicious detailing of character and milieu.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    The Guest is not new, exactly, but Wingard knows just which buttons to push, and he pushes them with gusto. Stevens, meanwhile, has never been better.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Soul music’s alleged redemptive powers are fully at work in this jumbled, sketchily written but vastly appealing true-life musical comedy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    A sly, insidious and intermittently hilarious domestic thriller.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    That We Are What We Are steers just shy of silliness even at its most outrageous is in large part thanks to a committed cast of non-disposable character actors.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Avranas’ film employs an irony-free meter that certainly distinguishes his work from that of Lanthimos or Athina Rachel Tsangari, and lends the film’s most explicitly severe sequences of domestic and sexual abuse a kind of cumulative numbing power.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Michael Polish’s Big Sur offers an elegantly muted take on the midlife ennui of Kerouac’s autobiographical 1962 novel.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    A straightforward account of the show’s journey from conception to rehearsal to Great White Way triumph, it effectively doubles as a traditional let’s-put-on-a-show musical in its own right, albeit one with heavier guitars.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Powered by a vigorous, image-shedding lead turn from James McAvoy as a coked-up Edinburgh detective on the fast track to either promotion or self-implosion, this descent into Scotch-marinated madness begins as ugly comedy, segues almost imperceptibly into farcical tragedy, and inevitably — perhaps intentionally — loses control in the process.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    It’s a less playful enterprise than the original, but meets the era’s darker demands for action reboots with machine-tooled efficiency and a hint of soul.