For 801 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Americans: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Almost Human: Season 1
Score distribution:
801 tv reviews
    • 23 Metascore
    • 0 Hank Stuever
    The show specializes in the easiest forms of scripted cruelty and snark. The fat-shaming, such that it even exists, is brief and nowhere nearly as harmful as the middling idiocy of the entire effort. That’s my review and also a scolding: If you’re watching this, you really need better things to do.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Where’s the hit man? The crime boss? The heist? That’s where most shows take their weirdness; we’ve been trained to expect a bigger hook. Lodge 49, on the other hand, remains utterly human in scope and ambition--funny and meandering.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The Sinner deserves more than a passing glance, if for no other reason than to admire its balance: The core mystery is complicated but not overly so; the ambiguities are presented in terms of human flaws rather than philosophy tracts; the gore is politely measured out in necessary doses; the twists are plausible enough to pass muster; and, above all else, The Sinner’s pace and writing lure you in and resist the urge to drift, promising a conclusive wrap-up.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Making It, a crafting competition show premiering Tuesday on NBC, is so genuinely good-hearted and adorably inventive that it’s darn near impossible to criticize. ... For all its mutual happiness, Making It could pay a little more attention to the actual work that goes into the crafting and the wide range of personal styles shown by the contestants.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Hank Stuever
    If it’s meant to frighten, it’s not very good at that. If it’s meant to ruminate on the nature of evil, then that message never gets through. If it’s meant to creep you out, then it barely registers. ... The first three episodes, which premiere in one chunk Wednesday (a new episode will be released each week), spend too much time laying groundwork, meting out clues and references at such a sluggish pace that they’re not worth noting, unless the show considers its mission to act as a Stephen King book club.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    To giggle at and delight in Cohen’s pranks is to believe that you can have it both ways: that you can be horrified at the collapse of truth and democracy, and then laugh at a guy who seeks to undermine whatever remains of trust. As watchably galling as Cohen’s techniques may be, America in 2018 doesn’t really seem like the right time or place for it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    A mostly uninspired new season.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Aside from some slightly hammy subplots and the predictable snack of a red herring or two, those are my criticisms. In the same breath, I can’t deny that I charged through seven hours of Sharp Objects with an obsessive appreciation for the overall effort, propelled mostly by Adams’s effectively morose and complicated portrayal of Camille.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    It’s a show that works on a few different levels, but it’s never better than when it goes to giddy workout montages and thrilling ringside action.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    For all its honesty, something feels slightly off throughout the film; as if we’re seeing only a fraction of the personal turmoil. Reynolds’s anguish is a bit polished and his answers are all easy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Yellowstone’s weaknesses is its failure to teach viewers why (or why not) we should root for his independence; his Western entitlement alone won’t cut it, and the character Costner plays is unfortunately averse to explanatory monologues. ... Sheridan mostly resists the temptation to turn the series into a soap opera, relying on his knowledge of what today’s West actually looks and feels like, which gives the series its authentic air. The Montana and Utah locations help, too, supplying plenty of high-def beauty.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Season 4 turns out to be an unexpected treat. The new episodes capably reignite the show’s original allure, discarding some unnecessary bloat and focusing once more on The Affair’s basic premise, which is that no two people will ever view the same occurrences and facts the same way.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Pose makes no bones about its intent to school us on a litany of issues. A few of these lectures are memorably and even poignantly written and performed (I could listen to Jackson’s Elektra tell people what’s what all the way to 1989, at least), but most of them strain with effort. It’s always been hard to convince Murphy that a little goes a long way, and viewers will have to admit that most of Pose’s weaknesses tend to vanish during the fantasitcally entertaining ballroom scenes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Underwhelming in both execution and intent. ... Its occasional attempts at wryness result in a choking dryness, with the only levity coming from the arrival of a green and gullible cousin, Greg (Nicholas Braun), who attempts to ingratiate his way into this inner circle of snakes. The overall tone of cruelty is difficult to overcome.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    An honest if highly spit-shined effort.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Although it is filled with sort of pulse-quickening journalistic jujitsu one expects--the deadlines, the doggedness, the scoops, the backlash--it is also refreshingly human in scope, stopping more than once to observe the emotional toll on these journalists who are working themselves to the bone.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    A new two-part series, premiering Sunday on PBS’s “Masterpiece,” feels a little weak at the outset, with the story streamlined by “Call the Midwife” creator Heidi Thomas’s screenplay and arranged by director Vanessa Caswill in such a prettified way that it looks more like a “Little Women” Instagram feed than a timely interpretation. ... The performances, however, rise to the novel’s reputation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Suffice to say that Patrick Melrose is the Cumberbatch-iest thing the world has yet seen, which many will receive as wonderful news, while a few others (nonfans) might heed as a warning flare. ... Still, Cumberbatch’s all-in performance is a worthy reason to see it through--as are the performances from the supporting cast. Casual viewers, I suspect, might be surprised at how deeply they become invested in Patrick’s fate, hoping he can find some kind of the happiness that money cannot buy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    A confident yet dawdling new dramedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Hank Stuever
    Sweetbitter is an insultingly shallow riff on some of the usual sweltering-kitchen tropes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    Elvis Presley: The Searcher, is a fine demonstration of how the passage of time can help place even the biggest and most overloved superstars into a blessed relief. The film is a calm and deeply empathetic recounting of Presley’s life, split in two. ... A careful mélange of archival film and sonic clarity, The Searcher is a fine reassessment of Presley’s origins and impact.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Rather than reflect the panicky, competitive rush that results in all these half-thought, half-finished, fairly expensive and certainly mediocre series, Westworld demonstrates the proper way to spend a lot of time and money in a meticulous fashion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The new Lost in Space (all 10 episodes premiere Friday) is visually adequate but substantially thin, a stack of matzoh crackers where one hoped for frosted Pop-Tarts.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    With barely any deviation from the old format (the new spending limit has been raised from $1,000 to $2,000), the show offers a quick reminder of what made it so addictively watchable back in the day.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    When the film feels needlessly vague or remote, Pacino brings it back in with just a look or a sigh.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    As far as it goes, The Last O.G. is a mildly enjoyable half-hour. Its first six episodes are packed too heavily with plot and too easily move past the real attraction, which is watching Tray wander around Brooklyn in a state of cultural bewilderment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Redeeming itself from an overblown first half and having its energy continually sapped by frequent commercial breaks, NBC’s Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert was saved Sunday night by its emotional climax, as Brandon Victor Dixon (as Judas Iscariot) delivered an unforgettably raucous take on the show’s title number and John Legend (as Jesus) floated away on a cross into an impressively ethereal light display.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    Fans of the show’s intrigue will immediately notice an uptick in tension and momentum from last season that feels like a comeback. And fans of the complex love story between the show’s married pretenders, Philip and Elizabeth Jennings, will pick up on a new layer of iciness that may never thaw.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Hank Stuever
    Let me just declare how far over the moon I am about Barry, a funny, violent, gripping and masterfully melancholy half-hour show created by Hader and “Silicon Valley” producer Alec Berg. ... From start to finish, it’s just one hell of a show.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Three episodes shown to critics (there are nine in this new season) certainly do an entertaining job of updating the characters. ... Still, once Jackie and Roseanne bury the hatchet, there’s a sinking feeling of lost promise. Roseanne needs to do more than acknowledge that a Trump-voting grandmother can get along with her liberal-leaning sister and adore her sparkle-riffic grandson. It should courageously allow the Conner family to more tumultuously grapple with the idea that America is coming apart and changing profoundly.

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