For 785 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 FEUD: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Mob Doctor: Season 1
Score distribution:
785 tv reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    A new two-part series, premiering Sunday on PBS’s “Masterpiece,” feels a little weak at the outset, with the story streamlined by “Call the Midwife” creator Heidi Thomas’s screenplay and arranged by director Vanessa Caswill in such a prettified way that it looks more like a “Little Women” Instagram feed than a timely interpretation. ... The performances, however, rise to the novel’s reputation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Suffice to say that Patrick Melrose is the Cumberbatch-iest thing the world has yet seen, which many will receive as wonderful news, while a few others (nonfans) might heed as a warning flare. ... Still, Cumberbatch’s all-in performance is a worthy reason to see it through--as are the performances from the supporting cast. Casual viewers, I suspect, might be surprised at how deeply they become invested in Patrick’s fate, hoping he can find some kind of the happiness that money cannot buy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    A confident yet dawdling new dramedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Hank Stuever
    Sweetbitter is an insultingly shallow riff on some of the usual sweltering-kitchen tropes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    Elvis Presley: The Searcher, is a fine demonstration of how the passage of time can help place even the biggest and most overloved superstars into a blessed relief. The film is a calm and deeply empathetic recounting of Presley’s life, split in two. ... A careful mélange of archival film and sonic clarity, The Searcher is a fine reassessment of Presley’s origins and impact.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Rather than reflect the panicky, competitive rush that results in all these half-thought, half-finished, fairly expensive and certainly mediocre series, Westworld demonstrates the proper way to spend a lot of time and money in a meticulous fashion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The new Lost in Space (all 10 episodes premiere Friday) is visually adequate but substantially thin, a stack of matzoh crackers where one hoped for frosted Pop-Tarts.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    With barely any deviation from the old format (the new spending limit has been raised from $1,000 to $2,000), the show offers a quick reminder of what made it so addictively watchable back in the day.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    When the film feels needlessly vague or remote, Pacino brings it back in with just a look or a sigh.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    As far as it goes, The Last O.G. is a mildly enjoyable half-hour. Its first six episodes are packed too heavily with plot and too easily move past the real attraction, which is watching Tray wander around Brooklyn in a state of cultural bewilderment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Redeeming itself from an overblown first half and having its energy continually sapped by frequent commercial breaks, NBC’s Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert was saved Sunday night by its emotional climax, as Brandon Victor Dixon (as Judas Iscariot) delivered an unforgettably raucous take on the show’s title number and John Legend (as Jesus) floated away on a cross into an impressively ethereal light display.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    Fans of the show’s intrigue will immediately notice an uptick in tension and momentum from last season that feels like a comeback. And fans of the complex love story between the show’s married pretenders, Philip and Elizabeth Jennings, will pick up on a new layer of iciness that may never thaw.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Hank Stuever
    Let me just declare how far over the moon I am about Barry, a funny, violent, gripping and masterfully melancholy half-hour show created by Hader and “Silicon Valley” producer Alec Berg. ... From start to finish, it’s just one hell of a show.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Three episodes shown to critics (there are nine in this new season) certainly do an entertaining job of updating the characters. ... Still, once Jackie and Roseanne bury the hatchet, there’s a sinking feeling of lost promise. Roseanne needs to do more than acknowledge that a Trump-voting grandmother can get along with her liberal-leaning sister and adore her sparkle-riffic grandson. It should courageously allow the Conner family to more tumultuously grapple with the idea that America is coming apart and changing profoundly.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Viewers should feel much more comfortable on this saucier side of Shondaland, where workplace sex and relationships continue unabated by either human-resources departments or social-awareness movements. The strongest feeling from these shows is a stultifying sense of been-there, done-that.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    What’s mildly intriguing, at least in the first few episodes, is the chance to see a Shondaland series in its nascent moments of restraint, when the dialogue and plot still have a chance of resonating with reality.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It’s unabashedly rote. ... Attempts to mask Instinct’s shortcomings with Cumming’s dapper, devilish manner don’t help all that much.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The results in the first few episodes are mixed, with LOLs spaced a little too far apart.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Hank Stuever
    It’s an excellent and deceptively precise show about the human condition.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The show’s disclaimer about fudging some facts to smooth the story out makes it difficult to decide if you should Google along with it (or thumb through Wright’s book) trying to nail down its accuracy. Maybe it’s more watchable if you let yourself get lost in it and pay closer attention to its themes rather than its footnotes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Free of fact-checking chores, Unsolved does fine by luring viewers along as a decently written and well-acted crime procedural, as Kading and his crew chase new and old leads that both affirm and contradict the work that Poole and others did a decade earlier.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Hendricks, Retta and Whitman give believably strong and collaborative performances as three people stuck in a dangerous mess. The supporting cast (especially Lillard) also provides a sound base from which the show can broaden its perspectives and subplots. While the show nimbly mixes action with you-go-girl snark, it occasionally stumbles in its fleeting and nominal nods to a feminist subtext, which should be self-evident and not needing an extra coat of empowerment to make it shine.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    With each episode, Sud and her writers demonstrate a sharpened skill for pace and revelation, along with gracefully subtle ruminations on corruption, racial profiling and--more profoundly--the very nature of morality. ... Mostly what you’ll feel at the end is exhausted, regarding the clock with some bewilderment: Did I really just lose myself in 10-plus hours of gripping television?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Everything Sucks! can only sit by and envy “Freaks and Geeks’s” deft touch with memory, momentum, characters and dialogue. It’s difficult to portray teen awkwardness when the show itself is this clumsily conceived and executed.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Hank Stuever
    A dreadful misfire ... [Checking off boxes] is all the show does, with no indication that further episodes will get better or worse. It just kind of sits there, surrounded in snide dialogue and hollow gestures of concern.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    As a moody and essentially faithful adaptation of Carr’s novel, the series gets off to a chilly yet satisfying start, an adequate entry to a particular genre that features dim lighting, resourceful urchins, a class-conscious tone and the sort of arftul staging of corpses that signifies brilliant derangement on the part of the killer. ... Peppered with cliches and predictable banter, The Alienist relies mostly on its atmospheric details to draw viewers in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    High Maintenance is hardly an advertisement for pot; once in a while it even seems to suggest that the drug keeps the Guy and his customers in a slightly numbed state of response to the world around them. These are not the stereotypical stoners of yore. Like so many Americans, they’re just looking for a break from all this. That they do and don’t find relief is part of what makes the show so believably, wistfully good.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Fascinating yet repellent. ... Is it about beauty? Is it about psychosis? Is it about gay rights? Yes to all that, but never effectively.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The show is a fine example of what television might look like once we move past the more ceremonial aspects of diversity. This is a black show on a network filled with white superheroes, and it displays no insecurity or self-consciousness about that. It feels strong and confident, at least in the first two episodes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    [David Letterman] seems only half-engaged here and far too much in the thrall of his first guest, who left office a year ago and has avoided the talk-show circuit until now. Both men seem rusty at the art of banter. They’re off their game. The interview doesn’t produce any surprising or newsworthy statements from Obama. ... The discussion meanders along the surface, touching on Russian interference in U.S. elections and the state of discourse in American society--though never deeply.

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