For 531 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Nashville (2012): Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Zero Hour: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 90 out of 531
531 tv reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Ellis, particularly, gives a lead performance that is strong enough to mask some of the script’s problems.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    A powerful and unforgettably thorough HBO documentary, is not only an exploration of what happened (difficult questions linger, particularly about the response of the town’s police to the initial 911 call), it also invites a frank and remarkably even-handed discussion of what sort of punishment could ever fit the crime.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    An enjoyable dramatic movie.... [But] Because it’s a film both by and for the devoted, An Adventure in Space and Time tends to too easily revel in its own creation myth, veering quickly into a tidy, Hallmark-like ending.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Homeland is wearing a bit thin even while it nobly stays the course.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Looking feels spot-on and real; it falters only when it occasionally pauses to let one of its characters gaysplain, in dialogue, a subject that it believes a larger audience might not get.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The good news about Sonic Highways is that it doesn’t have enough time to bore us to tears.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    We have to take the good things about Boardwalk Empire (the acting, the authenticity in its exquisite details and most of the writing) along with the bad (the repetitiveness, the plodding).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Although no expense has been spared, House of Cards appears to suffer from the same ambitious but weighty seriousness that afflicted Starz's "Boss."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The first episode of Last Week Tonight (and, to be clear, it is only the first episode, with plenty of potential and room for improvement) demonstrated little in the way of innovating or improving on “The Daily Show’s” prevailing concept.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The beady-eyed Durst is a wily but generous interview subject, but where The Jinx really succeeds is in its fantastic attention to pace and detail, particularly in reenactments that are far and away better than what we usually see on “48 Hours,” et al.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It’s a lot less fun now; when watching these new episodes, I found it impossible to complete any sentence along the lines of “I hope [blank] happens to [blank],” not counting my hope that poor Adam (Hannah’s increasingly complex boyfriend, played by Adam Driver, who now provides the show’s only gravitational pull) will come to his senses and flee.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    In the Flesh skillfully navigates several genres at once, all of them heavy, none of them comic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Though not as artfully constructed as Penny Lane’s excellent documentary “Our Nixon,” which aired last year on CNN, Nixon by Nixon is similarly judicious in its use of visuals and old footage.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    [The] new episodes are no great shakes, but they do find Futurama humming along.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Hank Stuever
    It’s difficult to know whether Fortitude aims to be a “Broadchurch on Ice” or, at its most extreme, a riff on John Carpenter’s “The Thing.” In its favor, the show has an irresistible setting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    For the most part, Girls is still wickedly written and, for some viewers, the best hate-watch around. Yet it too easily runs on fumes from a hipster era (circa 2012) that is already ossifying.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The show is point-blank, but somewhat brilliantly so.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    I'm slightly more taken with Fox's sweeter absurdedy, Raising Hope, though I still mourn the original title: "Keep Hope Alive."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    What we get for most of the show’s 90 minutes, is a mostly funny, often charming and occasionally unsettling account of a man whose diet and whereabouts are under his wife Camille’s constant surveillance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It’s as if someone looked up instructions for making a period cable TV drama and followed them to the letter--and wound up with something like a “Boardwalk Empire”-style story arc set in an old-timey “E.R.,” only with a much weaker pulse.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Effortlessly smart, easy to like and exciting to follow.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Having watched the serviceable but flat opening episodes of this new season, I think now is as good a time as any to ask if it’s worth going on with The Walking Dead, when all it does is underline its message of futility over and over and over.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    I think its jokes are predictable and its '60s-era styling is tired.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    So much about Marvel’s Daredevil works exactly the way it’s intended, including the pace of the action and the extent and style of the gore. What still doesn’t work--what almost never works where the name Marvel and live-action film/TV meet--is the hammy dialogue, especially when characters express their feelings to one another.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Bessie is a thoughtful and at times stirring example of how a film can add texture to a legendary figure.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Hank Stuever
    Fresh Off the Boat wants to be both “Black-ish” and “The Goldbergs”--and it works fairly okay as a companion piece to either--but it’s a lot better show when it occasionally stops going for just the easy jokes and aims for a subtler, sharper line of comment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Luck is suffused with brilliant acting and amazing scenes, but in a few unfortunate ways, it remains impenetrable almost until its last hour.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Public Speaking often seems to be trying to relaunch the Fran Lebowitz brand, 25 years past its expiration date. It feels like the kind of movie that old friends would make about an old friend. Which is precisely what it is.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    A brisk and pleasingly outrageous hour-long set taped before a crowd of 39 people in a very small Los Angeles venue, she shows off her ability to segue from naif to sharp-tongued devil in a split-second.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Downton Abbey doesn’t meet any objective criteria for brilliant television except for one: escapism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Foster makes for an energetic and engaging lead, never missing a beat; the rest of the cast is equally snappy-snippy, thanks to scripts and story lines that keep everyone prancing along like trained poodles.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Though I do not begrudge Ray Donovan its sense of momentum or tension, I was immediately struck by a desire to simply see more of Ray doing his job for a few episodes rather than seeing him deal with his brothers’ various problems.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    There’s not a lackluster performance among the superb cast members of Bloodline; Chandler and Cardellini, especially, are in top form. Nevertheless, it’s Mendelsohn, as Danny, who makes the best of a script that at times seems overly opaque.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    As lovingly written and organized as it is, the viewer must divide his or her time picking up on different scenarios and moods, caught between rather ho-hum murder cases and this other, more beguiling attempt to craft a show that is about the nature of loss and grief.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Guest has assembled a worthy and adept ensemble of oddballs. But it remains to be seen if the story itself will catch on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    For its epic investment, Living in the Material World still feels like only part of the story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Hank Stuever
    It's a beautiful downer of a show that becomes more revealing and absorbing as it moves along.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Hank Stuever
    If you haven’t been reading Marvel Comics lately... then the show can feel somewhat exclusionary and, frankly, a little too cornball and cutesy about its own geekiness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Gosh, that's a lot of derivative teen-movie influences for a half-hour show. Yet the swift pacing and simplicity of Awkward remind us that awkwardness can still be freshly painful and funny material, so long as there are still teenagers and high schools.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The pilot episode is stylish and swiftly paced, but that’s all it is, and despite some intriguing plot twists, there’s not a lot of motivation to keep coming back.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The show feels new again, but that doesn’t mean it feels fully refreshed, nor is it immune to painting itself into the same sort of corners it got stuck in before.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Hank Stuever
    It's an adrenalin-doused premise that is handsomely executed, but it feels like we get to Defcon 2 way too fast.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    This new, more mild Upstairs Downstairs, which makes its American premiere on PBS on Sunday night, is a three-part epilogue that feels more like an unfinished afterthought.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    The new episodes push the saga in a few initially intriguing directions, but the cast keeps expanding into an overpopulated mishmash of disparate story threads that no longer weave together as a whole.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    'Klondike' is not going to win awards for its lackluster screenplay and penchant for melodrama, but it does have some of the plucky energy you’d enjoy at one of those faux-saloon dinner theaters, where the gradations between good and bad hardly exist. It comes across almost like a musical without any songs, and before long, you’re swept up in its crisp visuals and steady pace.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    While it's not perfect, Bunheads is a happy find, a ray of authenticity on a summer TV schedule filled with so much artificial light.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Most of History of the Eagles is rich in detail and bemused reflection, perhaps because sobriety has worked wonders on some of the band members’ sense of recall. Frey, Walsh and Don Henley are wonderful storytellers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    An intriguing but often clumsy new movie about the making of the TV show.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Tiny flaws come close to undermining the success of Game Change as a mere film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Humans does have that pleasingly antiseptic feeling of euro-cool about it (think of how the Benedict Cumberbatch “Sherlock” series looks, or BBC America’s “Orphan Black”), which can sometimes lure viewers into the belief that they’re watching something classy and sophisticated, when really they’re just snacking on the TV equivalent of rice cakes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Hank Stuever
    Elementary exhibits enough stylish wit in its mood and look to quickly distinguish itself from the latest British "Sherlock" series.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Hank Stuever
    Barry takes off so fast that a viewer hardly gets a chance to know him--or care much about where he’s headed.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Where the original series had a clear through line and a strong sense of the grief that surrounds murder, the new Broadchurch unsuccessfully juggles several more plots and characters, grafting an older case onto the (surprisingly still ongoing) Latimer case.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The show seems markedly improved from its earlier efforts and somehow more confident in its writing and sense of nuance. It's also funnier.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The meandering approach does manage to excavate some fascinating tales and memories.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The show makes an admirable effort at transcending gayness without compromising it. Groff is fine but not fascinating as the naive yet manipulative Patrick, and Alvarez gives Agustin a certain bohemian flair. The real standout--and best-realized character so far--is Bartlett’s Dom. Actually, the more I think about it, the show’s real standout is San Francisco itself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The show is also refreshingly entertaining, even when it relies on familiar cliches of the singing-competition genre.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Hank Stuever
    There is absolutely nothing new about anything seen here and yet Arrow has nice aim.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Snail-paced and difficult to relate to, Parade’s End feels twice as long as its total running time. And yet it’s an exquisite and thoughtful sort of slog, with sound British pedigree and bone structure.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Orphan Black has the same plain club soda flavor you get in most cable action dramas now, but I have to say that I’m enjoying some of its fizz.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Hank Stuever
    Judging only the pilot episode, the banter between them (Dean Winters and Josh Duhamel) can be fun and Gilligan’s influence lends a nice, creepy sheen to the notion that menace lurks anywhere, even (or especially?) in the upper Midwest.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    There’s something instantly likable about Outlander’s commitment to its themes and sensibilities.... Not having read the book, I find the show sort of charming and sufficiently thrilling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Weirdly enough, Getting On (adapted from the original BBC series) is a witheringly efficient work of satire, easily confident about the humanity and absurdity it’s trying to portray.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    There's exactly one hour left for a fall TV show that tells its tale in a deliberate, well-written and subtly acted way. That one hour belongs to Fox's Lone Star.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Paradise Lost 3 is perhaps the most interesting and well-made film of the trilogy
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    This plot sounds laughably bizarre, but Hit & Miss has a strikingly strong sense of pace and character.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Except for a dismally protracted story line, there’s more than enough pure Downton-ness to enjoy this time around.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Hank Stuever
    Thanks to Louis-Dreyfus, and the show's remarkable knack for dialogue and timing, Veep is instantly engaging and outrageously fun.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s refreshing to see NBC bring out a comedy that values subtlety over slapstick, but the situations and dialogue here are just a little too subtle to draw viewers in.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    If it’s even partly a put-on, Seduced and Abandoned is nevertheless a fun, larky travel essay and commentary on the film biz, an exquisite wallow in the most rarefied sort of first-world problems.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    An engaging, hour-long documentary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    A charming and intelligent sendup of pop culture’s obsession with the end of everything.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Under the Dome does have an air of King’s more sinister tendencies, but not enough of them in the first hour to suggest the sort of horror that’s worth sticking around for.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    The better parts of The Strain will unsettle viewers with this new species of monster.... The first couple of episodes seem as if they’ve been assembled from a kit that’s missing a few nuts and bolts; by the third and fourth episodes, however, a viewer gets a much better sense of The Strain’s style and bite.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    What makes Teach: Tony Danza worth watching are the teenagers themselves and the glimpses of other teachers who make the place work. Danza, meanwhile, becomes an irritating, whirling, self-aggrandizing bundle of nerves.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Even with the cross-pond cultural differences, young adults who are perennially baffled by their aging boomer parents will feel right at home here.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Hank Stuever
    It’s ridiculous, it’s sumptuous, it’s perfect summer sorbet.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Hank Stuever
    There’s a lack of conviction to Almost Royal’s premise that means the funniest parts are only just mildly funny.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Our Nixon is mainly a collage of images and sounds that tell a familiar story in an entirely new and mesmerizing way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    A slow but steady 10-episode drama from Amazon that begins streaming Friday.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    Tennant is once again terrific at juggling a lot of emotions from one moment to the next. The supporting cast is also sufficiently fine, including a steely performance from Sophie Okonedo.... Plodding on too far, The Escape Artist becomes a revenge story. And yet, for the ineffably eurocentric reasons I was describing earlier, you keep watching and waiting for the surprise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Hank Stuever
    Gotham respectfully riffs on the DC canon, but it’s a whole lot better when it experiments with--and even subverts--the oft-trod territory of Batworld.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    Coven is the first time American Horror Story gets started with the unmistakable feeling of timecards being punched, as an ensemble of big-name stars dutifully carry forward the show’s trademark fixation on style over substance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    The first and second episodes drag a bit, taking a little too long to get to what The Comeback’s fans are here for--it’s more waiting on top of the nine years we’ve already waited. Soon enough, the show recaptures its old rhythm and we are rewarded.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Hank Stuever
    This trope--an actor playing a surlier, fictional version of himself--has been done to death already, and Don't Trust the B---- leans too heavily on the actor's state of celebrity limbo, filling in late-'90s jokes and references where the real laughs ought to be.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    One girds oneself for some serious hammer time when an opening fight scene of History’s compelling and robust new drama series, Vikings, delivers all the expected gore and blood spatter.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Hank Stuever
    The acrimony between the two men [Marc Maron and his father] doesn’t register as funny or entertaining. Louis C.K. has shown us, on “Louie,” what sort of deeper meaning can be mined in such deep contempt, but on Maron it just feels ugly and dull.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Review is one of Comedy Central’s most effortless and truly funny new shows in a while.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Hank Stuever
    Suburgatory displays a polished sense of humor and a better cast than it deserves, which makes it worth a look.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Hank Stuever
    As documentary subjects, the boys are in many ways impenetrable. Getting them to ignore the camera and just be themselves is next to impossible, but there are revealing, achingly honest moments that make the film worth watching.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Hank Stuever
    No one will accuse 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' of too much authenticity, but it does have a confident breeziness in its banter that almost immediately locates a ['Barney Miller']-esque balance in the more absurd aspects of law enforcement.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Hank Stuever
    [An] ambivalent but mildly engrossing new docu-series.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s rare to see a show get its style so right and its story so backwards.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Yet another dystopian vision with Steven Spielberg's brand name affixed to it (as executive producer), this time as a cheap-looking but occasionally intriguing sci-fi social study called Falling Skies.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    There's perhaps the coppiest cop show of the century so far, the soppy and self-satirizing CBS melodrama Blue Bloods, about an entire family--"the Reagans" yet!--involved in the crime biz.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    By the second hour (both of Monday’s episodes adhere to the minute-by-minute chronology; the fast-forwarding will happen later), it’s clear that Live Another Day is not much interested in broadening the show’s scope, feeling or characters. It does, however, have an abiding interest in the latest news about spying, vis-a-vis its own version of notorious document-leaker Edward Snowden: Chloe O’Brian.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    For a while you can sense Hannibal’s noble urge to stick to a long story arc--why does there have to be a new case every episode?--but eventually it gives in to a proven formula.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It's strange how a show meant to generate excitement and promote thriftiness can leave one with a sense of remorse and shame.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Hank Stuever
    Louie intelligently harnesses the dark cloud that follows a truly funny man everywhere he goes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Hank Stuever
    Virgin Territory isn’t lurid or easily embarrassed. That’s (sometimes) the wonderful thing about this social-network generation: They’ll talk openly about anything, everything.

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