For 762 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Orange is the New Black: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Saint George: Season 1
Score distribution:
762 tv reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The title tells you all you need to know.... The rest is pretty much gumbo from a can.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    A conceptually smart but only moderately funny comedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Robust but repetitive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    A watered-down and considerably less meaningful iteration of the 2002 Steven Spielberg science-fiction movie
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    As a moody and essentially faithful adaptation of Carr’s novel, the series gets off to a chilly yet satisfying start, an adequate entry to a particular genre that features dim lighting, resourceful urchins, a class-conscious tone and the sort of arftul staging of corpses that signifies brilliant derangement on the part of the killer. ... Peppered with cliches and predictable banter, The Alienist relies mostly on its atmospheric details to draw viewers in.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Whatever hopes "Arrested Development" fans may have held for a new Will Arnett series begin to dissipate by Episode 2--even with another "Development" funnyman, David Cross, on board as Emily's annoying eco-terrorist boyfriend. This tiny horsey has no giddyap, but there's still a chuckle or two.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    You'll blow a gasket if you watch this show with any trace of superiority or outrage. Instead, bafflement is a good resting spot; a guilty-pleasure glee works even better.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Halt and Catch Fire suffers from a common case of style over substance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Both shows [Storage Wars and Discovery's "Gold Rush: Alaska"] also have their moments of absorbing drama and distasteful levels of bullheadedness, set against an American backdrop that once again seems mere steps away from the full-on, Cormac McCarthy-style apocalypse.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The first three episodes are all hints and shadows and squandered time, while the show’s most intriguing context and premise--life in a forgotten and neglected tribe--gets lost in all the meandering.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Preacher struggles to depict the challenges of ministry, relying mainly on cliche--which is disappointing, given the show’s title and central idea. Much of the first four episodes are spent untangling a convoluted premise (Preacher is in no apparent hurry to explain its basic mythology or connect some major dots) and offers only the barest glimpse at some essential back­stories that would help viewers follow along.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Produced and directed by Sheila Canavan and Michael Chandler, Compared to What? spends too much of its 1 1/2 hours cementing Frank’s legacy as one of the last lawmakers on the Hill who understood the art of compromise.... The film is too admiring of its subject. Compared to What? is more entertaining (and revealing) in a present tense, capturing Frank as an inveterate schlub septuagenarian.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Selfie’s addiction to topical techie satire tends to get in the way of Gillan and Cho’s attempts to convey an unlikely chemistry that might help the show rise above a concept that already feels like yesterday’s clicks.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Downton Abbey lacks surprise and is stretched precariously thin, a house full of fascinating people with not nearly enough to do, all caught in a loop of weak storylines that circle round but never fully propel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The special isn’t as funny or inventive as one might hope. The set-up is cheesily self-aware.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Red Oaks is no better or worse than its peers in this genre; certainly it will trigger fond and awkward memories for those who lived it or something like it, but the pilot episode released earlier this year doesn’t make a case that these feelings have much thematic potential beyond the usual cliches.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    By the second hour (both of Monday’s episodes adhere to the minute-by-minute chronology; the fast-forwarding will happen later), it’s clear that Live Another Day is not much interested in broadening the show’s scope, feeling or characters. It does, however, have an abiding interest in the latest news about spying, vis-a-vis its own version of notorious document-leaker Edward Snowden: Chloe O’Brian.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Sometimes it’s fun to get utterly lost in a drama like this; sometimes it’s better to turn around and keep driving.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s refreshing to see NBC bring out a comedy that values subtlety over slapstick, but the situations and dialogue here are just a little too subtle to draw viewers in.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    A sometimes sharp but painfully predictable Constantine premieres Friday night.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    There are moments in which the acting and the dialogue in A.D. achieve a quiet and entirely believable beauty, suitable for devout and secular audiences. But as soon as I say that, here comes the “Constantine”-esque angel riding the blazing meteor down to the tomb in the middle of the night for the rolling away of the big, round stone. The flashiness is reminiscent of cheesy megachurch passion plays.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Despite some initial problems with pace and a bland idea of suspense, The Last Ship is at least a break from all the detective and lawyer shows that characterize cable TV’s long summers.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    9-1-1, an engaging but surprisingly rote drama from hitmaker Murphy and co-creators Brad Falchuk and Tim Minear.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    As smart and topical as this show could be, the plot begins to sputter and wheeze way too soon; in trying to come up with the scariest thing it can think of, Cult is oddly low on the sort of chills that would keep a viewer up at night.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Formulaic but fashionable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Becoming Chaz is one thing--and it's occasionally fascinating to watch--but being Chaz gets old pretty fast.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Tveit is kind of an underwhelming Officer Opie here, while Sunjata brings a menacingly ambivalent character to life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    So far, several story lines of small-town secrets and drama have fanned out and fizzled, making it hard to tell if “Bates Motel” wants to be compellingly chilling or just tediously unnerving.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    I Am Cait is, on some level, the most respectful melding of television’s notion of cinema verite and Hollywood’s highest form of top-notch, controlled publicity. Rarely could a show be so completely about the management of reactions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The Wizard of Lies is determined to play things straight and footnoted, which would be fine if viewers had tuned in for a documentary. When what we’re really here for is De Niro, Pfeiffer and some drama. Things don’t really get good until a flashback to a company dinner Madoff threw for his employees the summer before everything came tumbling down.

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