For 381 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hank Stuever's Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Broadchurch: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Malibu Country: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 73 out of 381
381 tv reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s all done with a cold efficiency and a gloomy, disinterested tone.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The show has a sincerity about its silliness and light spookiness; for a moment there, it’s almost as if 'True Blood' tried to conceive a demon baby with 'Bunheads.'
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It fixates on the familiar, sullen murkiness similar to recent procedurals (“The Killing” and “Broadchurch,” for example) and adds several more layers of its own artistic yet unfulfilling murk.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    It’s difficult to escape the show’s plasticky veneer and misplaced exuberance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    An ambitious--yet disappointingly stiff--staging of the original musical.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    So far, several story lines of small-town secrets and drama have fanned out and fizzled, making it hard to tell if “Bates Motel” wants to be compellingly chilling or just tediously unnerving.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    The first three episodes are all hints and shadows and squandered time, while the show’s most intriguing context and premise--life in a forgotten and neglected tribe--gets lost in all the meandering.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    Although Sevigny brings some of her flair for playing stubbornly outré characters to this role, Those Who Kill fails to distinguish itself from “Hannibal,” “The Following” and so much else in TV’s corpse-strewn imagination.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Hank Stuever
    No one can survive Surviving Jack’s hollow and formulaic dialogue, which is bursting with jokes that are half-funny at best.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    An ambitious but ultimately weak attempt to set an ensemble drama inside Hugh Hefner's hallowed, smoke-filled nightclub of early 1960s Chicago.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    The show vacillates between hokey and clever as it mines the Brothers Grimm for contemporary analogues.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    A new but forgettable TV treatment for an old story, with results that look very "CW."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    Nothing about Sean Saves the World is off-putting, but not much about it is welcoming either.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Hank Stuever
    At times Black Sails feels like it wants to be taken seriously as a complicated, premium cable drama (a la “Game of Thrones”). At other times, it feels more like cheesier, more niche material (a la “Spartacus”).
    • 87 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Try as I might, Mad Men fails to resonate, settle in, tell me something. It can no longer get out of its own way so as to allow its multiple story lines to experience actual forward momentum. (Only the calendar does that.)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Every setback endured by Vince and his entourage (box-office bombs; girl trouble) is smoothed over by the arrival of six-figure paychecks and the bromantic ideal. It's pretty to look at, but stagnant all the same.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The network has brought back Hart and Lawrence, who are both 34 (whoa!), in a sitcom called Melissa & Joey, premiering Tuesday night, which isn't half-bad. You could do worse--say, "Hot in Cleveland."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    There's something blandly nutrition-less and sugary about Mike & Molly, CBS's new Hostess Twinkie of a Monday night sitcom.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Every scene in School Pride feels like the seventh or 10th take and too contrived, even by the low standards of reality TV....I will say that School Pride seems less manipulative and showy than its forebears.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    The always-appreciable Dana Delany does her level best to lift Body of Proof, a paint-by-numbers morgue drama premiering Tuesday night on ABC, from its stale premise and up to the level of a beautifully-flawed-character study, something more akin to Julianna Margulies's legal procedural, "The Good Wife."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    It's still pretty blah and rarely rises above a relative's chatty slide show of vacation pictures.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Even when the pacing and writing and performances seem to line up, some intangible quality fails to quite hit the spot.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Yet another dystopian vision with Steven Spielberg's brand name affixed to it (as executive producer), this time as a cheap-looking but occasionally intriguing sci-fi social study called Falling Skies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Skins is so determined to relate to hardened kids--without sermon, theme or context--that it accidentally discovers a new frontier in phoniness and filth. Even if I could warp time and watch it as my teenaged self, I'm pretty sure I would have been bored by it back then, too--even with all the sex.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Morgan's first show turned out to be a fawning and completely unnecessary interview with a successful businesswoman named Oprah Winfrey.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    There's a bit of banter well-delivered and some artful action, yet Breakout Kings lacks a certain vim and chemistry required for a real breakout series.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Both Restaurant and "Millionaire" stir similar pots of self-pride, entrepreneurship and the psychic reward of sharing one's good fortune. But because the medium is television--reality television--each show collapses under the pressure of showing off its sense of nobility and higher purpose.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Both "Restaurant" and Millionaire stir similar pots of self-pride, entrepreneurship and the psychic reward of sharing one's good fortune. But because the medium is television--reality television--each show collapses under the pressure of showing off its sense of nobility and higher purpose.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    In the first four episodes, there isn't anyone or anything to root for, other than history's corrective hand.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Hank Stuever
    Although it is 90 minutes long, it feels much longer, and the truly smart laughs are few.