For 142 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Howard Rosenberg's Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 L.A. Law: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 America's Funniest Home Videos: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 74 out of 142
  2. Negative: 36 out of 142
142 tv reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    A cops-and-crime hour reeking of atmosphere, wit and intelligence, an invigorating, essentially nonviolent series about homicide detectives that could be the "Hill Street Blues" of the '90s. [29 Jan 1993, p.F1]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    This is just the kind of amusingly off-center comedy now missing from NBC's lineup, one of those rare, delightful meshings of concept, cast and execution, with producer Tom Cherones providing inspired direction. Nothing is forced. [31 May 1990, p.F9]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Easily the the best, cleverest and nuttiest arrival of the 1989-90 season is The Simpsons...It's very small-scale, but perfectly conceived and executed. What we have here from creator Matt Groening is a rare confluence -- delightful writing, pictures and voices fitting like a Matisse. [12 Jan 1990, p.F1]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    It's high-pitched, unforgettable, knockout, electrifying TV...There should be a law requiring more series like NBC's new L.A. Law. [15 Sept 1986, p.C1]
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    The globe's smartest, funniest, greatest comedy series. [19 Jul 1995]
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    "The Larry Sanders Show" opens its fifth season tonight by reminding viewers just how extraordinary it is, not only as one of the funniest, smartest comedies ever, but also in sometimes having celebrity guests depict themselves in ways almost as curious as stories on "The X-Files," the otherworldly Fox series that made [guest David] Duchovny famous.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    The wittiest, smartest, sharpest-written, most original comedy of the season.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Gandolfini and Falco are excellent, as is the supporting work of Imperioli and others. And that grande dame of troupers, Marchand, is so coldbloodedly plausible as Livia that her eyes are ice and you can almost hear her heart freezing over. [8 Jan 1999, p.F1]
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Arguably the best reason to own a TV set.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    "The Sopranos" remains the elitist of the elite. ... Competing against its shimmery self, and the lofty expectations it creates, "The Sopranos" resurfaces once more as a superbly written and executed hybrid of popular entertainment and high art, offering up its own Golden Age of TV.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Twin Peaks teeters on the very edge of exquisite absurdity. Its genius is that it plays both on the level of subtly ludicrous melodrama and on the level of a baffling whodunit, as most lines of dialogue appear to contain a hidden meaning, most faces a dark secret.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    May be the best-ever film depiction of war in the trenches, large screen or small, and TV's loftiest miniseries since the Brits sent over "The Jewel in the Crown" in 1984. Give Band of Brothers a medal. [7 Sept 2001, p.C1]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Sunday's premiere delivers spectacular fun with great style edged in melancholy, its balance of breathless action and tenderness providing still more evidence of this fall's crop of new shows being the best in years. [29 Sept 2001, p.16]
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    A genius series the equal of ABC's "NYPD Blue" at its best, and one that delivers more boom for the buck than either NBC's admired crime tome "Boomtown" or the irritating coppers of FX's "The Shield."
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    If its premiere epitomizes what's ahead, Steven Bochco's intense legal drama Murder One will be the best new series of the fall season. Period. Case closed. Jury dismissed with thanks...With "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law" and "NYPD Blue" already heading his resume, Murder One is quintessential Bochco, a well-acted, smartly written, meticulously presented hour that turns the law inside out while telling a good story that makes you feel like you're spying on these people through a peephole. Created by Bochco, Charles H. Eglee and Channing Gibson, it has that irresistible thing that identifies a series as a creative success: You can't wait for it to return.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    A striking six-week miniseries delivering one of the rawest, truest, most provocative and involving dramas ever beamed to Americans. And one of the most important, defining a seedy, destructive junkie subculture in vivid, aching detail in the tradition of such theatrical films as "Panic in Needle Park," "Drugstore Cowboy" and "Trainspotting." [14 Apr 2000, p.F1]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    None of Undeclared feels forced, and it helps enormously that the cast looks like it belongs, the actors fitting their environment perfectly. [25 Sept 2001, p.C6]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Deliciously funny satirical gore. [10 Mar 1997, p.F1]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Great stuff. Not a perfect strike, but close. [7 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    The sexy, urbane Friends -- from Marta Kauffman, David Crane and Kevin Bright, the people responsible for the HBO super-comedy "Dream On" -- starts fairly strongly tonight, improves next Thursday and in week three gets on a grand, hilarious, rip-roaring roll. It's the perfect series to bridge "Mad About You" and "Seinfeld." [22 Sept 1994, p.F1]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Not only does The Golden Girls offer meaningful portrayals of women in their post-middle-age years, but, as a bonus, it's one of those TV rarities, a comedy that's funny. Very funny. [13 Sept 1985, p.C1]
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Real talk shows should be as acutely funny.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    As always, the acting is so artfully straight-faced and the scripts so full of in-the-know nuance that "The Larry Sanders Show" seems to reek of behind-the-scenes television reality.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Spin City just happens to be very funny. [17 Sept 1996, p.F1]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Among the most gratifying and promising new series of the fall season. [29 Sept 1998, p.F1]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Yet another of fall's superior new dramas. Devoid of caricatures, this one is by far the best-ever TV depiction of the big fellow, framing him nicely as part of a coming-of-age story and treatise on little town America, before he moves to Metropolis and becomes Christopher Reeve. [16 Oct 2001, p.C1]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Although the characters' coarseness is matched only by the somehow appropriate crudeness of Judge's rudimentary animation, Beavis and Butt-head are simply too exquisitely absurd and vacuous to be resisted.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Although the humor begins broadly, it grows on you as you adjust to its rhythms, and ultimately you hear yourself laughing out loud. This is easily NBC's best new series. It's also one of those distinctive comedies in which everything meshes. [2 Oct 2001, p.C2]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    The lingering concussion of Sept. 11 does nothing to undermine Fox's new thriller focusing on terrorism. Instead, it adds to its credibility and makes it all the more gripping. [6 Nov 2001]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    A scorching look at the drug trade in a Baltimore housing project through the eyes of mid-level dealers and police. [31 May 2002, p.C1]