Howard Rosenberg
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For 146 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Howard Rosenberg's Scores

Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Twin Peaks: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 America's Funniest Home Videos: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 75 out of 146
  2. Negative: 38 out of 146
146 tv reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    A cops-and-crime hour reeking of atmosphere, wit and intelligence, an invigorating, essentially nonviolent series about homicide detectives that could be the "Hill Street Blues" of the '90s. [29 Jan 1993, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    This is just the kind of amusingly off-center comedy now missing from NBC's lineup, one of those rare, delightful meshings of concept, cast and execution, with producer Tom Cherones providing inspired direction. Nothing is forced. [31 May 1990, p.F9]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Easily the the best, cleverest and nuttiest arrival of the 1989-90 season is The Simpsons...It's very small-scale, but perfectly conceived and executed. What we have here from creator Matt Groening is a rare confluence -- delightful writing, pictures and voices fitting like a Matisse. [12 Jan 1990, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    It's high-pitched, unforgettable, knockout, electrifying TV...There should be a law requiring more series like NBC's new L.A. Law. [15 Sept 1986, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    The globe's smartest, funniest, greatest comedy series. [19 Jul 1995]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    "The Larry Sanders Show" opens its fifth season tonight by reminding viewers just how extraordinary it is, not only as one of the funniest, smartest comedies ever, but also in sometimes having celebrity guests depict themselves in ways almost as curious as stories on "The X-Files," the otherworldly Fox series that made [guest David] Duchovny famous.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    The wittiest, smartest, sharpest-written, most original comedy of the season.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Gandolfini and Falco are excellent, as is the supporting work of Imperioli and others. And that grande dame of troupers, Marchand, is so coldbloodedly plausible as Livia that her eyes are ice and you can almost hear her heart freezing over. [8 Jan 1999, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Arguably the best reason to own a TV set.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    "The Sopranos" remains the elitist of the elite. ... Competing against its shimmery self, and the lofty expectations it creates, "The Sopranos" resurfaces once more as a superbly written and executed hybrid of popular entertainment and high art, offering up its own Golden Age of TV.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Twin Peaks teeters on the very edge of exquisite absurdity. Its genius is that it plays both on the level of subtly ludicrous melodrama and on the level of a baffling whodunit, as most lines of dialogue appear to contain a hidden meaning, most faces a dark secret.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    May be the best-ever film depiction of war in the trenches, large screen or small, and TV's loftiest miniseries since the Brits sent over "The Jewel in the Crown" in 1984. Give Band of Brothers a medal. [7 Sept 2001, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    Sunday's premiere delivers spectacular fun with great style edged in melancholy, its balance of breathless action and tenderness providing still more evidence of this fall's crop of new shows being the best in years. [29 Sept 2001, p.16]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    A genius series the equal of ABC's "NYPD Blue" at its best, and one that delivers more boom for the buck than either NBC's admired crime tome "Boomtown" or the irritating coppers of FX's "The Shield."
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    If its premiere epitomizes what's ahead, Steven Bochco's intense legal drama Murder One will be the best new series of the fall season. Period. Case closed. Jury dismissed with thanks...With "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law" and "NYPD Blue" already heading his resume, Murder One is quintessential Bochco, a well-acted, smartly written, meticulously presented hour that turns the law inside out while telling a good story that makes you feel like you're spying on these people through a peephole. Created by Bochco, Charles H. Eglee and Channing Gibson, it has that irresistible thing that identifies a series as a creative success: You can't wait for it to return.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    A striking six-week miniseries delivering one of the rawest, truest, most provocative and involving dramas ever beamed to Americans. And one of the most important, defining a seedy, destructive junkie subculture in vivid, aching detail in the tradition of such theatrical films as "Panic in Needle Park," "Drugstore Cowboy" and "Trainspotting." [14 Apr 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Howard Rosenberg
    None of Undeclared feels forced, and it helps enormously that the cast looks like it belongs, the actors fitting their environment perfectly. [25 Sept 2001, p.C6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Deliciously funny satirical gore. [10 Mar 1997, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Great stuff. Not a perfect strike, but close. [7 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    This familiar package notwithstanding, the premiere of Gideon's Crossing delivers a complex and challenging main story of moral ambiguity as well as stunning performances by Andre Braugher as Gideon, Bruce McGill as a despotic patient with seemingly untreatable cancer and Russell Hornsby as chief resident Aaron Boies. [10 Oct 2000, p.F10]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    The sexy, urbane Friends -- from Marta Kauffman, David Crane and Kevin Bright, the people responsible for the HBO super-comedy "Dream On" -- starts fairly strongly tonight, improves next Thursday and in week three gets on a grand, hilarious, rip-roaring roll. It's the perfect series to bridge "Mad About You" and "Seinfeld." [22 Sept 1994, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Not only does The Golden Girls offer meaningful portrayals of women in their post-middle-age years, but, as a bonus, it's one of those TV rarities, a comedy that's funny. Very funny. [13 Sept 1985, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Real talk shows should be as acutely funny.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    As always, the acting is so artfully straight-faced and the scripts so full of in-the-know nuance that "The Larry Sanders Show" seems to reek of behind-the-scenes television reality.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Spin City just happens to be very funny. [17 Sept 1996, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Among the most gratifying and promising new series of the fall season. [29 Sept 1998, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Yet another of fall's superior new dramas. Devoid of caricatures, this one is by far the best-ever TV depiction of the big fellow, framing him nicely as part of a coming-of-age story and treatise on little town America, before he moves to Metropolis and becomes Christopher Reeve. [16 Oct 2001, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Although the characters' coarseness is matched only by the somehow appropriate crudeness of Judge's rudimentary animation, Beavis and Butt-head are simply too exquisitely absurd and vacuous to be resisted.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Although the humor begins broadly, it grows on you as you adjust to its rhythms, and ultimately you hear yourself laughing out loud. This is easily NBC's best new series. It's also one of those distinctive comedies in which everything meshes. [2 Oct 2001, p.C2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    The lingering concussion of Sept. 11 does nothing to undermine Fox's new thriller focusing on terrorism. Instead, it adds to its credibility and makes it all the more gripping. [6 Nov 2001]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    A scorching look at the drug trade in a Baltimore housing project through the eyes of mid-level dealers and police. [31 May 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    In a more refreshing fantasy, Boomtown's L.A. appears to be almost a one-medium town. In early episodes, at least, there are no local TV pests to harass Little and her publication, who have the news all to themselves. Which is one more reason why some of us think so highly of this series. [28 Sept 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    Highly arresting. [20 Sept 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    This is a rare TV union where cast, writers and directors appear to be of a single comedic mind; the humorous results speak for themselves. [7 July 1990, p.F11]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Howard Rosenberg
    [A] rip-roaring, hilarious half-hour show... It ranks with HBO's "The Larry Sanders Show" as the creamy class of the new season's comedy series.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    An amusing, highly promising light drama from the WB about mother-daughter bonding that is tender, warm and loving in a natural way without heaping on the schmaltz. [4 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    An endearingly weird and bent new ABC comedy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    If the premiere of Frasier does not manufacture laughs as consistently as one might expect from a "Cheers" offspring, it's still a cleverly written show with a quality cast that bodes well for the future. Mahoney is superb as the father, who reveals his inner feelings grudgingly, and Grammer is a master of the witty response. [16 Sept 1993, p.F11]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    This is that rare series about kids that is written by people you can envision actually having been kids. [11 Oct 1990]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Be assured, "NewsRadio" is no "Larry Sanders." Yet just like that HBO series, Simms' new one plays better than it reads. That's because the characters are imbued with amusingly quirky affectations that aren't necessarily visible in a script.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Unforgettable and not to be missed ... At times it overreaches, overdraws, oversentimentalizes. Yet among its excesses are troves of dark brilliance that mark "China Beach" as a potentially significant series.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    A rather bent sense of humor -- woven into a nice little whodunit -- is what lifts the flawed-but-engaging premiere of Picket Fences above the ordinary, raising expectations for the future. [18 Sept 1992, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Despite a bizarre courtroom sequence that strains credibility early in the episode, this is a very good start for Special Victims Unit, which promises to be a solid cop drama capable of occasionally stretching toward greatness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    The scripts are one-line oriented and sometimes an ugly howl, and the central characters are perfectly cast. The growly O'Neill and Sagal -- who has a terrific mincing walk that she may have picked up from her days as one of Bette Midler's Harlettes -- were born to insult and perform bowling-ball humor. [4 Apr 1987, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    As shamelessly superficial as the crowd it memorializes, but so sophisticated in its approach to shallowness that it's also great fun. [5 June 1998, p.F28]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Nourished by clever writing, the comic delivery of Allen and the earthy freshness of Richardson, "Home Improvement" is funny enough in spots to make you laugh out loud.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    The only major kink in Northern Exposure is its tendency to have Fleischman and the others expose their flaws only to finish each episode by doing the good and right thing, as if guided by some invisible magic wand. Otherwise, this is magical stuff that deserves a permanent spot on the CBS schedule. [12 July 1990, p.10]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Goldberg may be letting idealism infringe on Alan here in a way that detracts from reality. Moreover, Alan's sophisticated sense of humor seems terribly refined for his age. In many other ways, however, "Brooklyn Bridge" rings acutely true, from the production's natural lighting to the charming interplay among its characters.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Funny and wickedly weird.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    As twisty and spellbinding as ever. [28 Oct 2002]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    On the one hand, it's absolutely captivating, raw and unpredictable, a bubbling boiler of excitement rendered in the style of CBS' "48 Hours" and unrivaled by conventional cop dramas in prime time...On the other hand, the camera assumes the disgusting role of hanging judge by prematurely filling the screen with the faces of numerous suspects swept up in drug busts, some of whom may turn out to be innocent or may even go uncharged, for all we know. [7 Jan 1989, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    This is at once a chucklingly good satire of political infighters and dishonest press barons... and a grim thriller whose scheming protagonist makes Richard Nixon look like a guileless wimp. ... Its flaws are not in the acting or in Paul Seed's directing, but in the writing ... Otherwise, "House of Cards" is no less than evil at its grandest, bolstered by one sterling performance after another as it moves smoothly toward its jolting conclusion.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Although Maria self-consciously identifies her family as "Spanish," the series displays its Mexicana proudly, and is just witty and offbeat enough to stand out from the crowd. [20 Sept 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    It's not only the episode's sharp writing but also its eroticism and its balance between the naivete and predictability of Neil and the spontaneity and instability of Alicia that give 'Flying Blind' its uniqueness. What a nice beginning.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    The opening plot has some cracks, but none that can't be stepped over in an hour that is often transfixing and has you looking forward to the next episode. [9 Oct 1996, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Although most of the premiere is forgettable, the second episode is wheezingly funny and the third is also a kick. [7 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    Using film instead of videotape gives Baby Boom an elegant, cinematic texture that visually separates it from most TV comedies. But it's the smart, amusing script by the co-executive producers, Shyer's direction (the pilot is so fast-paced that you get the feeling he used a bullwhip) and Jackson's appealing mix of ambition and vulnerability as J.C. Wiattthat give this early sampling of Baby Boom its main charm.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Howard Rosenberg
    A funny gala of fresh, cleverly bent whimsy and endearing lightness that brings out the burlesque best in Christine Taylor, allowing her to far exceed her campy neo-Marcia in two movie revivals of "The Brady Bunch."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    As marred and derivative as "ER" is, however, there's something quite seductive about this series.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Whether [Carey] can stretch beyond his stand-up work and move to another level, as have such comics-turned-sitcom-stars as Jerry Seinfeld, Brett Butler and Roseanne, remains to be seen.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    There's something not quite right about this show's approach to homosexuality.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    At least initially, don't expect balance in other areas, either, for one of the religious right characters showing up tonight is a ruthless fanatic, the other a toady. That's politics, in Hollywood as well as Washington, D.C. [22 Sept 1999, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Breezy, smart-alecky fun.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    The cast is good, the stories arresting and the characters compelling. ... "The Practice" is a good series stopped mostly by its predictability from being very, very good.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Demonstrates how funny writing and good execution can supersede a hackneyed series concept. [21 Sept 1998, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Love, maybe not. But there's much to like, starting with Romano himself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    The premiere has the wonderfully distinctive geekiness but not the toothy bite of "The Simpsons," which was something spectacular to behold from the moment Homer uttered his first "Dohhhhhh!" There are some nice bits of amusement here, however, and surely the potential for growth.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Speaks with a more authentic teen voice than other series in this genre, becoming an antidote for WB's "Dawson's Creek," whose articulate, sophisticated high schoolers are adults in youthful bodies...The downside is that situations and characters here are so overdrawn, little space remains for subtlety or nuance. [25 Sept 1999, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    There is something highly appealing about this atmospheric CBS series.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Tender and sometimes humorously bent. Yes, some very nice moments in initial installments of its 13-episode commitment from HBO, but nothing shooting you to the moon. [1 June 2001, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Each episode is supposed to represent 22 minutes in Ellie's life. That's nice, but an ever-present clock on the side of the screen is a gimmick that should be dropped. Otherwise, this show has a very nice comfort level. Best of all, it feels fresh.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    This is nothing to build a night around. Yet the cast is good, action is crisp, flashbacks are seamlessly interwoven and dialogue is terse and effective.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Step by step, it's all very fascinating and as well-produced as television gets.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Mainly it's sort of gentle and nice...Do viewers want gentle and nice? That's to be determined. In any case, call "Madigan Men" promising. [6 Oct 2000, p.F28]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Howard Rosenberg
    Even though his relentless boyishness and flight from adult reality at times wears thin, Dave is a comfortable character, as well as being a nice fit for Anderson, who performs here with confidence and ease.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    Moderate achievement. [6 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    Its uniqueness and arresting style don't earn it an unqualified endorsement here, for its first two Fontana-written episodes are absolute downers--there's no light at the end of a tunnel, nor even a tunnel--that offer no central characters to like or pull for...Be forewarned, too, that Oz is flat-out the most violent and graphically sexual series on TV. By contrast, it makes ABC's "NYPD Blue" look and sound like dancing Barney. [12 July 1997, p.F2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    Laughs rarely equal the sum of the gimmickry in "3rd Rock." ... Yet the first three episodes do have their amusing moments. [9 Jan 1996]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    It totes a few smiles, but little to bowl you over, and it takes a spell getting used to.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    "Murphy Brown" doesn't exactly sizzle in its debut. ... It is a show you'd like to see again, however, which is more than you can say for much of the TV genre it caricatures.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    It's pleasant enough, but unremarkable. Although from the same production team, it doesn't approach the warmth, tenderness, charm and seamlessness of the 1997 film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    This is one of those broadly played comedies that needs reining in and writing sharper than having Ritter play super dad in what, essentially, is a single-parent comedy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    Although the characters are too inconsistent to be entirely believable and often act too inanely to be respected, there are enough nice moments here to lift "The Outsiders" above the ordinary and give it promise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    Potts has some nice moments. Even an actress as able as she, though, ultimately buckles under the tonnage of this character's supremacy, and strong supporting work from Greg Serano, Tamala Jones and Vicellous Reon Shannon as the students she takes under her wing is not enough to shore her up. [30 Sept 1996, p.F10]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Howard Rosenberg
    Although it's suspenseful, and Gedrick performs ably in the role that Johnny Depp played on the big screen, this latest series about an FBI agent's perilous double life isn't even in the same galaxy as "The Sopranos."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    The premiere has a nice look, and its "Rashomon"-style flashbacks are very well shot. It also features a socko ending and one ingenious bit of plotting involving thieving hookers. Yet the storytelling is often muddy, and sorting out characters and determining who does what is more of a challenge than the episode is worth. [6 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    It's an enigma, at the very least uneven.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    Watchable but disappointing. [21 Sept 1993, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    This split-personality series that speaks with two voices: one thoughtful and intelligent, the louder one glib and derivative. [29 Sept 1999, p.F6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    Glimmers of good acting peep through this maze of melodrama. Yet "St. Elsewhere" practiced more interesting medicine, and Kelley's Emmy-laden "Picket Fences" is bolder and more likable. More significant, so is "ER."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    Oft-funny but problematic. ... {The] humor ranges from inspired to cheap and sophomoric. [29 Jan 1999]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    The best thing Criminal Intent did was dump its low-brow, lower-IQ pilot. What remains, though, is routine at best, the violent master criminal planning a million-dollar diamond heist in the premiere naturally proving no match for the brilliant, X-ray-sighted Goren.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    What it all adds up to tonight, unfortunately, is something akin to a very slow camel or burro ride across long stretches of arid desert. There's dialogue galore, but comparatively little action and virtually no suspense.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    More often than not, however, most of the laughs are junior too.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    Early Firefly lacks majesty, and also that its laborious pace is hardly Star Warsian. [20 Sept 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    Everwood has much going against it, most notably an absence of subtlety that undermines Brown and others. He is so arrogant and smug (with a bedside manner bordering on the smarmy) that he's likable only compared with his conveniently snotty and mean-spirited rival. It's a stretch, by the way, that Abbott would be the only doctor in this rather cosmopolitan hamlet of 9,000 prior to Brown's arrival. [16 Sept 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Howard Rosenberg
    The Guardian, despite having some promise, wears prominently on its forehead the scarlet "P" of predictability. You can be fairly certain that not only will Fallin make this difficult situation work, but that he'll be a better man for it. [25 Sept 2001, p.C2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    The new cast is fine (Stewart is a very interesting actor) and the story, although not very deep, inspired or mind-melding, has a nice payoff. But getting there takes much too long. ... Although handsome, this is a slow, thudding two hours badly in need of energizing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    The bickering of the brothers -- who spend most of the half hour trying run down an anticipated inheritance from their deceased father -- quickly flattens into a tedious monotone. Loosen your seat belts. [19 Apr 1990, p.F10]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    Quantum Leap for the most part is so excruciatingly slow and laborious that you wonder if director David Hemmings was trapped in his own time warp. Yet Bakula does nicely, and the story ultimately accelerates and even yields some very affecting moments as Beckett intrudes on his own past. [25 Mar 1989, p.C6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    The premiere has a nice look, but not nice enough to compensate for a plot that lacks suspense and features a mystery whose culprit should be so obvious that you may suspect a red herring. [22 Sep 1995]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    Initially sleek and stylish but empty. [23 Sep 1992]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    Fresh Prince of Bel Air is being touted as a sure hit. If it becomes one, it will be because of the raw likability of its star, rapper Will Smith, not because of his acting skills or even anything that's been written for him in this NBC comedy. [10 Sept 1990, p.F9]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    The premiere of Designing Women...provides fewer answers than indications. And the indications are that even good performers in an appealing setting won't make Designing Woman funny without better-designed scripts. Snappy, yes. Laughs, no.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    "I'll Fly Away" makes it easy for us, relegating racism to a time and region that we can confront comfortably, steeping ourselves in self-righteousness as the series steeps itself in self-importance. ... Waterston and especially Harper give performances in these early episodes that bode well for whatever future "I'll Fly Away" has in its perilous time slot. But by the time the premiere has ended and Waterston gives his final pensive pause, you'll be the one wanting to fly away.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    Now and then you hear yourself laughing out loud. More often, though, this plays like a one-joke series that keeps repeating the same punch line. [6 Oct 2000, p.F28]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    It tops out at mildly funny and is infrequently even that, suffering from clashing tones and from too much Wuhl. [10 Aug 1996, p.F6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Howard Rosenberg
    Although its inconsistencies begin to spread gratingly as it heads into its second half hour, "Against the Grain" is fairly pleasant viewing until it impales itself on its artificial, unrealistically giddy ending.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    This is superficiality and pseudo-hipness gussied up in gloss.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Spenser is played by Robert Urich, a capable actor who you always feel should be doing something better than he's doing, but he never does. The show is shot in Boston and has a nice cinematic look. But the writing is so bad and the role so camp that you could substitute Bill Murray for Urich and not miss a beat.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    The evening's funniest show on CBS, though, is a drama, The Equalizer. [18 Sept 1985, p.6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    [They] don't begin to capture the period beyond its thin patina, and even worse, they are simply not funny...Some arresting visual techniques here, but the writing is heavy-handed, the humor broad and labored, and some of the acting way over the top. [22 Aug 1998, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    A ZIP code for stereotypes and stock characters, Beverly Hills, 92010 is nothing if not predictable, with the twins each facing moral choices and ultimately doing the right thing, presumably because they're from Minneapolis. [4 Oct 1990, p.F11]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    This remake of many remakes features a rerecording of the original Elmer Bernstein score, but no one in the cast has the magnetism to live up to that famous music, which comes with a set of expectations that asks a lot of the actors as well as of the script.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    So way unfunny and charmless...A big reason is that Blanchard hasn't nearly the glow or acting skill of Silverstone, whose spark--that aura of huggable sweet innocence shining through the superficiality--isn't transferred to the small screen. Blanchard blends with her pastels instead of standing out.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Alien Nation is covered with ooze. For one thing, it's about as subtle as an AK-47. For another, its aliens lack interest because -- except for looking a little different and humming like tuning forks when engaged in sexual foreplay -- they're almost human clones.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    No Boy Scout leaders in this bathhouse of a crowd, just relentless cruising and graphically simulated sex, at the expense of character depth, in an assembly line of orgasms ultimately as tedious as it would be if the humpers and thumpers were straight instead of gay.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    As always with these shows, skepticism is advised about the "reality" of "Amazing Race," from camera positioning to participants hamming it up for the lens while embarking on what Keoghan, in an upchuck of host hype, calls "the most daring competition ever attempted." [5 Sep 2001]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Insipid. [20 Sept 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Winfrey ... displays some of the appealing humanity that also characterizes her work on her syndicated talk show. ... But "Brewster Place" is so saccharine and enervating and [Winfrey's] Mattie so sorrowful and subdued that you feel weary just watching. Not too weary to change channels, however. [1 May 1990]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    As a concept, "Woops!" has satirical possibilities. But they aren't realized in the premiere.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Olin is fine as undercover cop Cameron Quinn, as is Jason Gedrick... as recent parolee Danny Rooney... But everything else in this two-hour opener falls hard, from the artificial conflicts that serve the script, but not logic, to the merciless bloating during which nothing happens but mood music, to the needless violence and softening of homicide with clumsy humor. These cadences don't come close to harmonizing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    The notion that a two-bit pug with Geraldo Rivera's swagger could work his way into the highest echelons of organized crime is absurd, but consistent with the rest of the story. It's a tossup which has more holes, the plot or the bodies that pile up here in one of those all-purpose, everyone-gets-blown-away-who-deserves-to-get-blown-away endings...With any luck, this show is history.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    It's the Mickeyspeak -- reacting to his mother and schmoozing with other adult-sounding infants -- on which the comedy mostly hinges. And except for some Shakespearean dialogue given a sniffy infant actor next week, the baby talk is strained and unfunny.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Goldberg works hard and Brenda is the kind of likable, energetic character on whom a comedy can be built. However, the awkward budding friendship between Brenda and the well-meaning, super-tidy Jasmine not only doesn't click tonight, it yields no laughs. More than merely an unlikely pairing, they're an arid one.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Although premieres are rarely the final word on TV comedies, this one felt like just another sitcom instead of stage two of Nia Vardalos' engaging froth about a 30ish Chicago travel agent whose intensely Greek family has an adverse reaction to her attachment to a "non-Greek" guy. Whereas the movie was over-the-top funny, the sitcom's opening episode was over the top minus the funny, despite lacking only one member of the big-screen cast.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Howard Rosenberg
    Has a few amusing moments, but is largely giftless ... You watch this half hour waiting for something to happen, but it never does. It needs less "gung" and more "ho."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    There's no magic, black or otherwise, in the WB's Charmed, a limp drama about three sisters who discover they are witches. [7 Oct 1998, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    A series for viewers who believe that everything sixth-graders do is funny -- is close to being as bad as sitcoms get. [24 Sept 1993, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    Hewett does about as well as possible in a half-hour that is so dull and insultingly bad that you can't tell the adults from the kids.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    One of the most forgettable [newcomers].[22 Sept 1989, p.C28]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    Play[s] like an extended shampoo commercial and lacking the edge and joyful vigor of the movie on which it is based....The premiere of the TV series is a static bore, mismanaged and miscast.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    Brother, is this a drag.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    Although the series was developed by the very same Garry Marshall who also directed the movie, it's geared mostly for cheap laughs and debuts with a gaggle of jokes that could make you gag. [2 Apr 1987, p.C-12]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    As TV's gold-hearted Reggie, the capable JoBeth Williams is undermined by a script with plot holes wide enough to drive the Atlanta Braves and their families through. The plodding, convoluted, unnavigable story has her resourceful 11-year-old client -- the court has made her his legal guardian -- gaining possession of $1 million in stolen loot, putting both of them in conflict with some murderous types.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    Unfortunately, none of this is very funny. It's unfair to compare Guzaldo and Riley with Wilder and Pryor, so let's do it. The latter were not at their best in the theatrical version of "Stir Crazy," but provided enough punch to make the movie at least watchable and occasionally amusing. And they also had chemistry. Guzaldo and Riley have no chemistry. Nor do they appear to be very funny actors. Maybe it's the material.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Howard Rosenberg
    The opening story... is thin and uncompelling. ... This is one of those series in which plot is relatively unimportant, however. What is important is the Murphy/Fannuchi relationship, which is only partially platonic, but fully unbelievable. If the relationship doesn't work, the series doesn't work. The relationship doesn't work.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 10 Howard Rosenberg
    Just about worthless, and as a bonus, also highly irritating. [6 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Howard Rosenberg
    You have the feeling that the title... refers to the number of viewers it will attract. Either that or their IQ.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 10 Howard Rosenberg
    The trouble is that although Uncle Buck is not as boorish as "Married . . . With Children," it also is not nearly as funny...In fact, Uncle Buck is not funny at all.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 10 Howard Rosenberg
    The cast doesn't seem especially in tune with the material. The script's attempted witticisms, for example, topple from King's tongue like bricks...H.G. probably would throw one at Timecop.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 10 Howard Rosenberg
    I vaguely recall experiencing waves of nausea while watching Down and Out in Beverly Hills.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 Howard Rosenberg
    This is really bad, from low-tech special effects to an opening script that could have been written by one of the show's own theropods.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 10 Howard Rosenberg
    The least bearable series of the fall.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 0 Howard Rosenberg
    Full House isn't playing with a full deck. It oozes and blubbers for a half hour, yielding no laughs or life. You need a Geiger counter to detect its pulse. [22 Sept 1987, p.C6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 37 Metascore
    • 0 Howard Rosenberg
    Downright megabominable, a half hour of mostly violent, amateur-produced slapstick whose biggest victims are inevitably its smallest participants. Children.