Ian Buckwalter
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NPR
For 117 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ian Buckwalter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 95 Tabu
Lowest review score: 0 This Means War
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 55 out of 117
  2. Negative: 13 out of 117
117 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Ian Buckwalter
    This is a movie so in love with its own supposed cleverness that it never realizes it's not all that clever.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 45 Ian Buckwalter
    It's not that Part II is bad, exactly. If "The Hangover" had never existed, this movie might feel funnier than it does, if not quite as freshly hilarious.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 55 Ian Buckwalter
    Ultimately, in a film that highlights the physical barriers - walls, roadblocks, armed guards - that keep Palestinians where the Israelis want them, the film's biggest barrier is the one Jacir erects between Soraya and the viewer.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 35 Ian Buckwalter
    With 26 films, one for each letter of the alphabet, one might expect enough gems in the mix to make up for any stinkers. That's sadly not the case.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Ian Buckwalter
    Will Tom choose the woman before him, or the maid of honor just a few feet behind? Unfortunately, given barely any idea of who these people are beyond their contrived literary inclinations and impeccable fashion sense, it's hard to muster much emotional investment in the decision.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Ian Buckwalter
    The result isn't fresh and realistic, though; it's clumsy and stilted. Improvised dialogue can work wonderfully if the actors have a solid feel for their characters, but everyone here seems rushed and uncomfortable.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Ian Buckwalter
    It's a shame that the film comes across like an awkward and ingratiating teenager, given that the two performances at its core are so winning.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 45 Ian Buckwalter
    At times, to be blunt, he (Trejo) comes off like a silent film star who's accidentally lumbered onto the set of a bloody, violent, thoroughly ridiculous talkie: reluctant to speak, sometimes a little confused by his surroundings.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Ian Buckwalter
    The Purge is mostly a genre picture trying to layer on some prestige by way of social commentary. The latter falls flat; the film is actually stronger when it just goes for our baser instincts.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 35 Ian Buckwalter
    Feels from start to finish like a throwback to the action cinema and military thrillers of decades past.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 45 Ian Buckwalter
    The entertainment value of the violence trumps most of the larger meaning, and the film exploits its characters just as they do their prisoners.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 45 Ian Buckwalter
    Renton's approach is, to its benefit, fair and never strident. But it's also gentle and cautious, often to a fault.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 46 Ian Buckwalter
    The movie's two bright spots are Cox and Dano, who perform excellently despite the dull inevitabilities the script forces on them.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 65 Ian Buckwalter
    If these experiments in shock comedy don't always work, there's a certain courageousness in the way Tim and Eric refuse to back down from them, as well as the gusto with which guest stars like Reilly, Robert Loggia, Will Ferrell, and Jeff Goldblum throw themselves into the film's gonzo aesthetic.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Ian Buckwalter
    The Change-Up's spin on the material transplants the same old house on a crumbled foundation, trying to disguise its creaky familiarity with the gaudiest coat of paint possible.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Ian Buckwalter
    Anderson's repeated hurling of flaming volcanic projectiles directly at the screen — the dominant feature of the latter third of Pompeii — is firmly in the lovably trashy spirit of the '50s drive-in.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 15 Ian Buckwalter
    Hafstrom, on the other hand, has some serious work ahead of him if he wants any kind of absolution after this wreck.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 35 Ian Buckwalter
    Without much actual character to latch on to, most of the actors seem lost and awkward, even the usually dependable Hall.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 64 Ian Buckwalter
    Aided by subtly wounded performances by Daniels and Stone, and a surprisingly affecting comic turn from Reynolds, Paper Man makes up for many of its shortcomings with an abundance of heart.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Ian Buckwalter
    Genre aficionados are likely to revel in every crunched bone, gratuitous decapitation and slow-motion iron-maiden impaling.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Ian Buckwalter
    Judging from the lack of care that went into making this one, I'm not so sure how much Schrader cares about the movies anymore either.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Ian Buckwalter
    Without the humor, the stereotypes that define these characters aren't satirical; they're just mean-spirited and dull.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 0 Ian Buckwalter
    With the material they're given, they mostly just seem foolish for showing up to the movie to begin with. Audiences would do well to avoid the same mistake.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Ian Buckwalter
    Olek never decides what his film should be, and the result takes wild stabs at slasher gore, supernatural horror, black comedy and even social commentary, thanks to a zero-hour attempt to tie things up with a morality tale about the damaging effects of organized religion.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Ian Buckwalter
    The effect eventually becomes that of about a dozen story pitches all strung together. Any one of them might have the potential for greatness in isolation. Try to mash them up into one movie, though, and much like Jack, they fall to pieces.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Ian Buckwalter
    This is a movie for those who watched Liam Neeson in "Taken" and thought, "Hey, this is fun, but can we do it without having to wait 15 minutes for the action to start?" Solomon has 90 minutes at his disposal, and doesn't want to waste time with setup.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Ian Buckwalter
    The film places a great deal of stock in the role of geography in its characters' happiness, but doesn't really address the fact that their problems don't necessarily stay in the rear-view mirror once they hit the road for that change of scenery.

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