Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
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For 183 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ignatiy Vishnevetsky's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Immigrant
Lowest review score: 0 Battle of the Year
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 75 out of 183
  2. Negative: 27 out of 183
183 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    By tackling one man’s sense of right and wrong (or lack thereof), Oppenheimer is ultimately tackling human nature.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It manages to convey a desire for power in abstract terms, divorced from material gain or a need to be admired. What’s more, it manages to do it with energy and a good deal of weird humor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    If it weren’t for "The Act Of Killing," Narco Cultura would be the year’s queasiest documentary. The film — which counterposes Quintero’s day-to-day life with that of Richi Soto, a crime-scene investigator in Juarez — is both an unflinching record of Mexico’s drug war and an investigation of how violence becomes unreal and glamorized.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Michael Mann’s Thief is one of the most confident directorial debuts of its era, the product of an unprecedented amount of research and preparation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The visual and thematic palette immediately brings to mind Michael Cimino’s once-maligned "Heaven’s Gate" — except that The Immigrant accomplishes more in two hours than Heaven’s Gate did in nearly four.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Resnais’ new film, You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet, is ostensibly an adaptation of two unrelated plays by Jean Anouilh: "Eurydice" (1941) and "Dear Antoine": Or, "The Love That Failed" (1971). However, Resnais’ methods of adaptation — placing one play within the other, and then refracting its dialogue across multiple characters and layers of reality — quickly eclipse the source material.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Drug War brings to mind Soderbergh’s recent "Side Effects", a film defined by similar changes in perspective and genre. However, while "Side Effects" is best at its midpoint, before the viewer has really figured out what kind of movie it is, Drug War becomes both weightier and more playful with each transition, building to a harrowing finale.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    As a close look at Jodorowsky’s work reveals, the line between “cult artist” and “cult leader” can be blurry. The line only gets blurrier with The Dance Of Reality, Jodorowsky’s first movie in 23 years, and the best thing he’s done, film-wise, since "The Holy Mountain."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It feels as though wherever the camera might be—and however it might be moving—is exactly where it belongs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Though shocking violence and black humor run through the length of the movie, what comes through most strongly is its pessimistic political conscience; were the movie less earnest, it might seem Verhoeven-esque.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Ramon Zürcher’s miniature debut, The Strange Little Cat, is one of the most confident and unusual first features in recent memory.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It’s a credit to both Mackenzie’s talent as a director of actors and to the underlying humaneness of his vision that he argues that the right option is the more difficult and less predictable one — and that he does so without relying on sentimentality, unearned sympathy, or a happy ending.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    While the improvisatory movement of the camera helps create a sense of ambiguous tension in the scenes where the crew interacts with the pirates, it also undercuts several more overtly dramatic moments. However, this shortcoming of filmmaking imagination is largely redeemed by the pessimistic wallop of the movie’s ending.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Essentially an essay film, Museum Hours is less interested in plot than in using its characters as a way to give ideas shape and voice; however, because their performances are natural and improvisatory, the movie never seems didactic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    In an era of high-falutin’ tentpole sci-fi, there’s something to be said for a filmmaker still devoted to crafting plain old genre pleasures.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It plays less like a contemporary horror film than an increasingly gruesome drama, building to a climax — completely original to this version — where the movie’s core themes are expressed through grotesque imagery.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    For fans of wushu flicks — or action movies in general — Man Of Tai Chi presents a rare appreciation for the art of conveying movement on screen, while also serving as an impressive physical showcase for its star, stuntman Tiger Chen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The question of why Cooke’s career never materialized hangs over the movie, but is never answered. What emerges instead is a portrait of a talented teenager being readied — by coaches, basketball camps, and the media — for a future that doesn’t arrive.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Part locked-room mystery, part political allegory, Non-Stop is one of the most purely enjoyable entries in the ongoing cycle of Liam Neeson action-thrillers.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The performance, one of Hoffman’s last, is unostentatious, but sensitive. Hoffman inhabited lifelong losers better than any other actor.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    An entertaining, effects-driven black comedy, with shades of "Starship Troopers" in its depiction of warfare as a futuristic turkey shoot, the movie is distinguished more by how fluidly it handles its high-concept premise than where it takes it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It comes across, instead, as a directorial flight of fancy, an imaginatively goofy take on an already goofy idea, exaggerated by Besson’s blunt style and an uncommonly fast pace.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Fast & Furious 6 is equal parts Ocean’s movie, Road Runner cartoon, and WWE SmackDown. In other words, it’s more or less the same movie as its predecessor.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    While White House Down isn’t going to score points for originality, seriousness, or subtlety (Emmerich likes his political messages blunt and loud), it is a lot of fun; if nothing else, Emmerich is a great widescreen showman who knows how to stage mayhem on a grand scale.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Though Lafosse’s handling of the actors is pitch-perfect, his sense of structure is more problematic. The decision to start the movie at the end and then jump back several years undercuts the drama.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    This move is both redundant and counterproductive because it weakens one of the screenplay’s central conceits — the way Bettany’s guilt is shared and experienced by other characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    By continually deferring dramatic tension, the filmmaker puts more weight on the movie’s closing scenes — which are abrupt but true to life — than they can handle.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Though this movie can’t match the formal qualities that made the pair’s most iconic films work, it goes a long way toward recapturing their sense of cheesy fun.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Still, that doesn’t detract too much from what Philomena manages to accomplish: a sober consideration of how ideals relate to institutions — whether they’re religions or political parties — anchored by two well-rounded, funny lead performances.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Tangents involving government committees and the nuclear energy lobby only serve to scatter the already-diffuse narrative, as do numerous intertitles relaying facts about nuclear power in Japan or indicating the passage of seasons; they seem like leftovers from a longer film.