For 944 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J. Hoberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Cowards Bend the Knee or The Blue Hands
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 74 out of 944
944 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Cronenberg's movie manages to have its cake and eat it--impersonating an action flick in its staccato mayhem while questioning these violent attractions every step of the way.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    One of the best titles in movie history and a cast to match.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    More concentrated and svelte than its precursor, Once Upon a Time II also has the benefit of fights staged by Master Yuen Wo-Ping that show Jet Li -- another camera-age hero -- to even greater advantage.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Genuinely unnerving movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    An impressively coordinated enterprise that lasts three hours, manages a large cast, and covers a period of 30-odd years while successfully unfolding as a series of scenes from the life of a single character.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    A sustained immersion in gorgeously austere street photography and casual portraiture, the images punctuated by bits of black leader and gnomic intertitles, the action propelled by sweetly pulverized music and an effortlessly layered soundtrack of enigmatic conversations. Poetry is really the only word for it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Indeed, the man who invented Borat is a masterful improviser, brilliant comedian, courageous political satirist, and genuinely experimental film artist. Borat makes you laugh but Baron Cohen forces you to think.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 J. Hoberman
    Serbis may be a raunch-fest, but it's also a mind-trip--a raunch-fest with ideas.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Meta-documentary to the end, Empathy takes its leave by pretending to spy on one patient with his ear to the closed door, eavesdropping on another patient. How did watching the movie make me feel? Interested, amused, and um, empathetic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Filled with purposeful, if absurd, activity rendered gravely hilarious through Tsai's deadpan, distanced representation of extreme behavior.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Gently persistent in its ironies, "Funny Ha Ha" managed to be both charmingly lackadaisical and annoyingly smug; Mutual Appreciation, which Bujalski shot in grainy black-and-white in hipster Brooklyn (and is self-distributing), is even more so.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    If the carefully planted romantic intrigue is serenely slow to ripen, the process is never less than intriguing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Projects a confessional frankness about human relationships that has the messy feel of truth.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Unpretentiously poetic and casually stylish, yet perversely precise. Reconstructing the past, Carri seems to suggest, is akin to grabbing the water in a flowing stream.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    A small-screen aesthetic is evident in the abundant close-ups and tight framing, but Holland makes it work for her.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Black Book, which takes its title from a secret list of Dutch collaborators, is an impressively old-fashioned yet fashionably embittered movie.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Remains Chaplin's most sustained burlesque of authority.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    It is an essay in film form with near-universal interest and a remarkable degree of synthesis.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    It's at once brilliant and inept.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Kosashvili's camera is restrained, the better to render Late Marriage superbly brash, raunchy, and confrontational.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Accurate enough as history to provide a potent reminder that black independent cinema did not end with Oscar Micheaux or begin with Spike Lee.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Like many cult films, it is also less than the sum of its parts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    A 157-minute police procedural at once sensuous and cerebral, profane and metaphysical, "empty" and abundant, Once Upon a Time in Anatolia is closer to the Antonioni of "L'Avventura," and it elevates the 52-year-old director to a new level of achievement.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Jia Zhangke is one of the world's preeminent filmmakers, an essentially contemplative director whose considerable talent is further amplified by the significance of his material--namely, everyday life in the most dynamic economy on earth.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Spare yet tactile, a mysterious mixture of lightness and gravity, Alexander Sokurov's Alexandra is founded on contradiction. Musing on war in general and the Russian occupation of Chechnya in particular, this is a movie in which combat is never shown.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Increasingly violent (although always distanced), The Outskirts is at once appalling and bleakly humorous.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Exquisitely understated.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    An austere and fascinating documentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Not only a nifty late noir but a model of economical filmmaking--well-sketched atmosphere, deft characterizations, and a 78-minute running time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J. Hoberman
    Forget "Irreversible," this is the season's most piercingly feel-bad movie.

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